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My Maggie continues to have anal gland problems and seems to be prone to bladder infections also. Are there any members here who have had luck with special diets to prevent either or both problems?

I don't know if these problems normally go hand in hand, although it seems likely since Maggie's anals need to be expressed often, and it stands to reason that bacteria might find it's way into the urethra tube.

Just curious if anyone has any dietary advice....anything to make Miss Maggie more comfortable and to decrease the vet bills :freak:
 

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I heard that a high fiber diet helps with the anal gland problem.

Mine have to have their anal glands squeezed by the vet about every few months. So I'd be interested to hear other answers on this.
 

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Deb: It was suggested that I increase my Maggie's fiber intake when she was having anal gland problems. I did (added pumpkin & green beans) but it didn't make any difference. It was also suggested that I try to get her weight down as it was thought that being overweight contributed to the gland problems. I did that, too, with no change. Sorry not to be able to offer any helpful hints in this regard. As you know, Maggie no longer has her anal glands ... With regard to the urinary tract infections -- my Maggie had frequent ones which required treatment with antibiotics and eventually steroids. I do believe hers were related to urine leakage. I diligently wiped her (with baby wipes -- special wipes from the vet are outrageously expensive)after every urination but, since she was leaking urine on rest and I was often not around, it was impossible to wipe all urine away from her. The leaking urine also causes burning which is very uncomfortable. Curious if your Maggie has any urine leakage?
 

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Deb, I've been researching the effect of diet on bladder problems because of Traveler. Since he's a male, it might be a little different for your Maggie, but I've read that diet can help control bladder stones and problems. A website that I've found helpful is VeterinaryPartner.com. It mainly discusses bladder stones, but I'm sure the information is pertinent to bladder problems in general. :read:
 

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Thanks for the input friends. I've been checking vet sites online all day....and probably am finding a lot of the same info Sandy has been seeing regarding the different types of bladder problems. I don't want Maggie to have stones, so I'm considering some homeopathic preventive measures. Maggie doesn't leak, but the vet suggested I clean her with a Q-tip frequently because her anatomy holds urine. Perhaps the baby wipes would be a good habit to get into :freak:
I had heard about bulking the stools with veggies to prevent anal problems, and like Judy, it hasn't helped much for Maggie either.
I know this conversation is a bit graphic,and I apologize to those who haven't had to deal with these things. Maggie is only two years old, and I'm probably looking at years of preventive measures....so any input is greatly appreciated.
 

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Quote:Originally posted by debannib:
Maggie doesn't leak, but the vet suggested I clean her with a Q-tip frequently because her anatomy holds urine.
Deb -- Boy, this sounds familiar ... my Maggie actually had a "butt tuck" (am sure there is a medical term but this is more descriptive) several years ago. She was born with several folds of skin that completely covered her urethra -- is this what your vet was referring to? I honestly didn't think this was unusual until she started having repeat urinary tract infections. Her vet at the time said that her urine was getting caught in the folds, causing the infections. After a couple of years of antibiotics and steroids and boxes of baby wipes, the vet suggested I consider surgery for her. He had experience with this surgery and we spent many hours going over exactly what it would correct and what she would look like after. During the surgery he cut away a great deal of tissue (more than he originally anticipated). In spite of the pre-surgery info, I was horrified when I saw Maggie after surgery. She had a horseshoe of staples from the top of one back leg to the top of the other. Recovery was slow -- on the second day post-op Maggie removed one of the staples. Today you would never know she had had any surgery in that area. She still has a small fold left but, in the several years since surgery, she has only had one urinary tract infection. The surgery, of course, was a very serious step to take and only considered after a couple of years of infecions -- would I choose the same course again? Probably as Maggie was getting sick from the antiobiotics and had side effects from the steroids.
 

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Judy,
I think our Maggies were twins in another life /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/eek.gif Yep. She has deep folds to her anatomy, but the vet hasn't mentioned surgery...I NEVER knew there was such a thing! I certainly hope we don't get to that point, but it's nice to know it's an option.

She doesn't like this new routine in her life...and looks greatly offended at the intimate intrusion into her 'personal space'. :freak:
I will PM you when I need advice, as you seem to be the resident expert I may need.

Sandy, I'm sure you're learning about struvite and oxalate stones like I am. I see young female beagles are prone to stuvite stones, and 73% of males have oxalate stones. If Maggie's symptoms don't diminish, I will have the x-rays done to check for stones (the doctor didn't feel any stones, she wasn't in pain, so I didn't opt for x-rays ). However, she's not showing any improvement at all after four days on antibiotics; still drinking lots of water and going out every two hours....I'm hoping we'll turn the corner today or tomorrow.
 

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Quote:Originally posted by debannib:
She doesn't like this new routine in her life...and looks greatly offended at the intimate intrusion into her 'personal space.
I will PM you when I need advice, as you seem to be the resident expert I may need.
My Maggie got so used to the baby wipe routine that, when we would come in from outside, she would go straight to the kitchen rug, lay down and lift her leg so I could wipe her! Your Maggie will probably soon realize that the wiping is far preferable to the burning urine.
Please feel free to PM me whenever you need to.
 

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Deb, the emergency vet couldn't feel stones in Traveler, and he didn't seem to be in pain, either. /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/confused.gif Then the regular vets aren't sure what they see on the X-Rays are stones. I imagine that they're going to have to do more X-Rays 'cause we sure want to know if he has stones or a mass. /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/frown.gif I'm sure you've read that the only way to get rid of stones in a male dog is surgery as it's dangerous to try to break them up because of the possibility of blocking the urinary opening. /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/eek.gif
 

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Yea Sandy, I read the same thing. I also read that oxalate stones, which males often get are prone to regrow....and are more difficult to diagnose on x-rays. Let's not worry until he is retested and/or x-rayed again. That's the worst thing about the internet....there's TOO MUCH information, and it makes one think the worst. How is Traveler doing now?
 

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We feed Oliver Nutro Harvest - something or other and we feed him a very minimal amount of people food.
We haven't had any problems and his stools seem firm.
 
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