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once again homer has me and hubby at our wits end.he is still defiant and won't listen but his new thing is being scared of everything.he has always been somewhat nervous and scared of lots of things and the vet said to socialize him more-so that's what we are attempting to do with him(walks & taking him to the fleamarket when we havea selling table) but he is just worse than ever.he didn't used to bark and howl when he got scared but now he does-constantly and at everything,even a car driving by.i can't take him howling 50 times a day every time he hears something and don't know how to make him stop.is this a phase he will grow out of?is there a doggy downer pill or something he take to relax him?if hubby and are not both in the house he goes crazy too and whines constantly(in between howling!)hubby can't go in the garage and me in the house-doesn't matter if he is in with me or out with hubby he just whines at the screen door even if he can see both of us.he gets so upset he has runny poops and throws up.i left the screen door open one day so he could come and go as he pleases and he just ran in and out all afternoon whining.he gets lots of love and attention but hubby thinks maybe we spoil him too much and thats why he is so clingy and has to be with both of us-i don't know but i know he needs to relax or he's gonna give himself a heart attack or something.any ideas on what to do?he turns 1 may 6th so i'm hoping since he is young hopefully it's a phase but i just don't know
 

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I think you should consult a trainer to help you with a right exposure of Homer to the world. My guess is that he is scared of everything because the various noises and scenes weren't introduced to him at a right time and way..... but I'm no expert.
 

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That sounds a bit like "Separation Anxiety" - but like Eleanor, I'm no expert. I'm assuming you've checked with his vet and he's physically healthy. He is still young - and my beagles don't really "grow up" till they're at least a 12-18 months. To be honest, some of mine are clingy - my Joe is such a whiney baby and loves his mommy so much, but he doesn't set up a howl when I'm out of sight, but then he's never left alone since he has at least PART of the pack with him all the time. Beagles ARE pack animals and do better with others around them. I do understand that not everyone can have ten beagles - or even two - but here's an article I found on "Separation Anxiety" - perhaps it will help you.

Separation Anxiety
by dr. christine welch




Separation anxiety is an important issue because it is the second most common reason that dogs are euthanized or given up by their owners. Many dogs react to the stress created from being left alone by becoming destructive, barking continuously or eliminating in the house. Separation anxiety occurs in dogs of all ages and breeds. It is most commonly seen in dogs who have particularly close relationships with their owners and who are rarely left alone.

Attachment to the pack is a normal canine behavior that is necessary to a dog's survival. In domestic dogs this attachment becomes transferred to people. When deprived of their human "pack" or primary attachment figure some dogs become so frantic that they display a variety if severe and unacceptable behaviors. Most typically these behaviors include those mentioned above, however, generalized depression, diarrhea and self-mutilation can also occur in dogs who are extremely stressed.




The behaviors associated with separation anxiety follow a somewhat predictable course. Many dogs bark excessively when they are first left alone. Some dogs continue barking for hours while others go on to choose another behavior when barking does not bring about their owners return. Many owners inadvertently reinforce increased vocalization by returning to console their unhappy pet.

Some dogs become very destructive when left alone. Their high level of stress causes them to dig, chew or scratch doors, rugs or household furnishings. An otherwise well trained dog will suddenly chew or shred anything left in its path in an attempt to find relief from the anxiety it feels from being left alone. It is very common for these episodes to also include urination and defecation in the house. Usually this occurs in well housebroken dogs and happens within minutes of their owners departure, even if the dog has recently relieved itself.

There are several effective ways of correcting or at lease minimizing these objectional behaviors. The first involves adopting a matter of fact and calm attitude when preparing to leave the house. Emotional and lengthy goodbyes will only serve to heighten your dog's anxiety. Ignore any display of stress related behavior in your pet and reward only those behaviors that are desired and appropriate.

Dogs who become destructive should not be given the opportunity to do so. They must be crated or put in a small area devoid of household objects. Chew toys or rawhide strips can be provided for tension release. If possible, exercise your pet before your departure as this will encourage rest.

Discipline for dogs suffering from separation anxiety should consist of behavior modification (unpleasant consequence for objectional behavior followed by reward for appropriate behavior). Ideally the goal for dogs suffering from separation anxiety should be anxiety reduction. When this is achieved the undesirable behaviors will aromatically also be reduced. Sometimes the addition of another pet can be very helpful providing both companionship and distraction for dogs who are unhappy when they are alone. Other families have had some success with playing the radio or TV while they are out to provide pets with normal household sounds.

Frequent practice departures with rewards for appropriate behavior will help condition dogs to stay calm. As your dog becomes more comfortable with this you can gradually increase the time that your dog is alone.

Many cases of separation anxiety are misinterpreted. People often think that their dogs are being destructive or bad on purpose. It is helpful to learn that this behavior is sparked by instincts that are necessary to pack survival and can not be considered spiteful. Punishing a dog who suffers from separation anxiety will only make things worse.

If your dog is having a problem being left alone, it is time to consult your veterinarian. Professional advise will greatly improved your chances of successfully correcting this difficult behavior problem.
 

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Duke went through a short period when we first started walking him where he was afraid of people and cars, but luckily he grew out of that quickly (except for the yorkie we came across about a month ago and he wouldn't go near it.LOL).

I think the above posters gave you great advice, it does sound like separation anxiety and it may require the skills of a trainer to work out the issues. Good luck.
 
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