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Hi all
Fizz has now entered the wide world, and is loving the outdoors. So much that she for her small size is dragging me around, what is the best way to get her to walk alongside me when on the pavement?
When in open spaces she has free roam with an extending lead, could this be a problem when she comes onto the shorter lead for pavements?
 

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Shouldn't be a problem. You need to work with her on commands. The heel command is extremely important (in my opinion), and from stories and experience with Chloe, beagles are a little stubborn with it.
You should work with treats and praises. There are many ways to teach "heel", here are two:

Well, it isn't as difficult as you might think. There are two general methods of training. One uses only positive reinforcement and the other uses a mixture of both positive and negative tactics. First we will discuss the positive reinforcement method.

In this method, you must first place your dog on a short leash and procure several of the dogs favorite food treats, a few pieces of dry kibble from the animals dog food is normally suitable. Decide which side you prefer your dog to walk on and train from this side in the following manner. With the dog by your side, facing in the same direction, place a treat in your hand next to your hip. In a firm, yet gentle voice, say "heel" and walk forward. When the dog responds by stepping with you, praise them and reward them with the treat. Remember to be consistent and not to reward before the action is carried out, yet always reward for a good performance.

With a lot of patience, this method will work well for most dogs and results in a close bonding of the pet to the owner. However, some dogs are just naturally harder to train, just like some people. If you are blessed with one of these independent and strong willed pets then you might have to avail yourself of a different method of training, which was mentioned earlier in this discussion.

To use the second training method, you must start with a slightly longer leash of approximately seven to ten feet. Allow your pet a few moments to explore the boundaries of the leash and understand how it works. Then call the animal to your side and position yourself as before with the animal next to you, facing the same direction. In a firm voice, say "heel" and walk forward. At this time, the dog will probably not walk with you. It will, instead, begin to explore most likely running in a different direction than where you are leading.

To correct this behavior, turn in the opposite direction of the pets' direction of travel and take a few steps forward, quite briskly, as you raise the leash to shoulder height and let it play out behind you. The result of this action will be seen as the animal quickly reaches the end of the leash and their forward momentum teaches them the age old physics lesson that "Every action has an equal and opposite reaction." The animal will quite quickly learn that to disobey the heel command results in a discomforting feeling from the sudden stop at the end of the leash and, after a short while, will learn to obey the command. When the pet reaches the state of obedience, be sure to reward them with lots of positive reinforcements, such as play time and treats, along with rich verbal praise.

Whichever of these methods you choose in the training of your pet, the "heel" command is sure to go a long way in making you a much happier pet owner who will be proud to show your pet anywhere. Remember to train with love, patience and consistency and your pet will reward you with loyalty and many, many years of companionship.

(taken from i-love-dogs.com website)
 

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I agree, it is very handy to have a beagle who will heel when needed. I try to avoid situations where the Bagel has to 'polite walk' (heel) but they can't always be avoided. Crowds, sidewalks, going to the vet's office are typical situations where the Bagel has to display proper canine manners. Teaching the Bagel to heel was the second thing I trained him to do, ‘sit’ which is a part of proper heeling was the first. We actually took an obedience class (more for me than the Bagel) and it was the only time I used treats as an aid (Praise wasn't enough to keep his attention when I'd stop and he'd be expected to sit without a command.) Also, in heeling, your beagle has to watch your motions, not follow his nose. A small piece of cheese or some cold cut s(chicken, salami or roast beef) held between the thumb and fore-finger of my left hand, the one holding the middle of the Bagel's leash, would insure the Bagel was watching my actions. I liked to use square cold cuts or cheese, make six horizontal and six vertical slices and have 49 tidbit size pieces. I'd put them in a couple zip lock bags (the empty bags are great for pooper scooper duties) and always dispense the first treat by having him sit, keyed off my left heel. With the next treat, clearly visible, I'd say 'heel' and stride off. When I'd stop and he'd sit, I'd often sneak him a treat, not always, but enough to keep his attention. Now, some nine years after training him, he heels for praise and love only!

It is a great way to bond with your pooch. I use a short leash for polite walks and a long lead for ‘sniff adventures’ or are normal walking where the Bagel gets to make most of the direction decisions. If polite walks lead to something that beagle fun, your beagle will learn to good things happen after heeling. For the Bagel, heeling leads to getting to play and run free with other dogs at the dog park, a sniff adventure in the desert or forest, getting praised by strangers at off-road races, or getting to visit his favorite veterinarian. Those are the only times the Bagel has to heel.
 

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LOOSE-LEASH WALKING METHOD:
Put your dog on a leash. It is reccomended to not use retractables, but if you must, then lock it on a certain length(a short length, that is). The minute the leash tightens, hold the leash TIGHT. DO NOT LET THEM BUDGE! Don't jerk them back though. When they return to you, praise them. Then say, "Fizz, let's go"' and take one step forward. The moment the leash tightens, repeat the previous task. Eventually, Fizz will realize that if he pulls, he will not get to continue the walk.
 
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