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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Has anyone vaccinated there dogs themselves? I never really thought about it but I read it can actually be less stressful for puppies since they wouldn't have to make the trip to the Vet.

I don't think i would have a problem administering the vaccine as i have handled needles and drawn blood from patients on many occasions at work. Is it better just to use the Vet??
 

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What? I didn't even know it was an option.
But that's not the issue in my opinion. A vet gives the dog a periodic check up, joints, coat, ears, eyes. they see stuff we don't know to see or detect, checking weight and thing.
I think it all depends in how you introduce the pup to your vet. How the vet introduces him/herself to the puppy. The animal clinic I take Chloe to - all the vets start the session with a 2 minute play with the dog, the atmosphere is more relaxed and everything goes by very quickly.

I would definitely stay with a vet!
 

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I wouldn't vaccinate a pup myself, going out and about to new places is all part of very important socialisation that all puppies need. Learning to go to the vet is all part of that process.

Our dogs actually love going to the vet and it makes it much easier they are used to that environment if there is an emergency.

We don't vaccinate every year anyway once the dogs are adults but we do go to the vet for check ups.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I would certainly still bring Fredo for periodic check ups and stuff. I would never not use a vet. I had just read that as for as vaccines its less stressful if you do it yourself. So i'm just talking strictly about vaccinations.

Your probably right though.... its probably safer to use a vet.
 

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Sorry, didn't mean to suggest you wouldn't do check ups - but I know my two don't stress out at the vets, certainly not for vaccinations anyway - but going to a vet is great for a puppy's socialisation and getting used to new places and people.

A lot of vets are advocating that owners only vaccinate adult dogs once every three years at the most now.... very interesting stuff to read up on!
 

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errmmmm sounds like NOT a good idea :S
no offense... but for me...
its better to be safe than sorry
a good reccommended vet may be the key

good luck!
 

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Sorry, not sure who you are responding to, the OP or me?

But just in case.... dogs do not need to be vaccinated every year. This is nothing new, its not an alternative, unsafe practice. Dogs do not need yearly vaccinating - that is not how the immune system works (we don't vaccinate ourselves yearly, for eg).

Many vets are now advocating at the MOST, three yearly vaccinating. Some links to read up on:

http://www.dogsadversereactions.com/Changi...eProtocols.html

http://www.news.wisc.edu/releases/8413.html

And explaining HOW the immune system works -

http://www.naturalvet.com.au/Fact Sheets/VACCINATIONs.doc

New Principals of Immunology

Dogs' and cats' immune systems mature fully at 6 months. If a modified live virus vaccine is given after 6 months of age, it produces immunity, which is good for the life of the pet (i.e. canine distemper, parvo, feline distemper). If another MLV vaccine is given a year later, the antibodies from the first vaccine neutralize the antigens of the second vaccine and there is little or no effect. The titer is not boosted nor are more memory cells induced.

Not only are annual boosters for parvo and distemper unnecessary, they subject the pet to potential risks of allergic reactions and immune‑mediated haemolytic anemia. There is no scientific documentation to back up label claims for annual administration of MLV vaccines.

Dr. W. Jean Dodds' website: www.hemopet.com

Puppies receive antibodies through their mother's milk. This natural protection can last 8‑14 weeks. Puppies and kittens should NOT be vaccinated at LESS than 8 weeks. Maternal immunity will neutralize the vaccine and little protection (0‑38°%) will be produced.

Vaccination at 6 weeks will, however, DELAY the timing of the first effective vaccine.

Vaccination given 2 weeks apart SUPPRESS rather than stimulate the immune system.

A series of vaccinations is given starting at 8 weeks and given 3‑4 weeks apart up to 16 weeks of age.

Another vaccination given sometime after 6 months of age (usually at 1 year 4 months) will provide LIFETIME IMMUNITY.



I am going to a Doctor Jean Dodds seminar in a couple of weeks- she is the world's leading expert on canine immunology. If it is an area you are unfamiliar with, it is worthwhile reading up on so you can make an informed decision about vaccinating.

ETA: There is actually more risk to your dogs immune system vaccinating yearly than vaccinating every three years, or not at all past a certain age. Many vets now will do titre testing which will test your dog's immune system - so you can do this each year instead of vaccinating.
 

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I know that breeders sometimes give their puppies the first couple series of shots. Our vet repeated one of them just to be safe as there can be issues with age of the vaccine.
 

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My family used to do our dogs' vaccinations ourselves. The local vet supply would sell everything needed. (Rabies was still given by a vet, though) I was my mom's assistant; holding each dog down as she gave them the shot. (Mom used to be a nurse) We stopped doing it because the vet supplies up here have gotten afraid of druggies buying needles. It was about half the cost (or less) of going to the vet. As long as you know what you're doing, (and have someone to hold the dog) I don't see much problem with it
 

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I know several breeders who do vaccinate their pups themselves - it's not an option for me - I want my puppies to be vet checked before getting their vaccinations. You can buy all the vaccines and supplies - even our local Grange carries them (everything but Rabies - which must be administered by a vet - at least here in WA). I did have a breeder friend who took a special course to be certified to administer the rabies vaccine. She was, however, a bigger breeder - and had over 40 dogs in her kennel. With my pack, I just prefer that my vet administer all vaccines - and I don't go with the yearly vaccinations. By the way, I think most places like Foster & Smith sell vaccines - and needles online. There are several other online pet supplies that carry them - some even come preloaded in syringes.
 
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