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Discussion Starter #1
This might sound like a really daft question but for those of you who have had a puppy and then gone on to adopt a rescue hound how different does it feel?

When you raise a puppy from lets say 9-10 weeks old to adulthood you get to see all the stages of that dogs personality coming through and maturing. For a large part how they are as an adult is down to you and how you raised them, much like your children. But when you take on a rescue you are initially blind to that dogs personality and character for a while. Does this make the bonding harder, especialy if the rescue is nervous/scared and shy's away from contact or affection.

I've no doubt that I would love a rescue hound with as much love as I do for any dog I've had since puppyhood but there must be a period when you kinda feel like you don't know your rescue at all.

I guess I'm asking what are your experiences of bringing a rescue into your life and how you felt about what is virtually a stranger at first.

I'm kinda liking it to adopting/fostering an older child as opposed to a newborn.

I knew this was gonna sound daft and it does :rolleyes: because I've made it sound as though puppies/babies don't have any personality which isn't true of course but I just don't know how else to say what I'm feeling.
 

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Jennifer,

Not daft at all.

I have never had a dog that wasn't an adult rescue.

I do wonder sometimes what they looked like when they were a puppy. What they were like. I lament that from time to time, especially when I see puppies on the forum.

But... do not worry ...I hope I can stress that enough. I love my rescue dogs as much as anybody has ever loved their puppy. I can say it with confidence.

Sometimes, they are so sad or hurt or frightened when they come to you, or you know the circumstances under which they were rescured and you bond with them quickly because you know how much they needed you.

I never compared it to adopting a child as opposed to having one of your own but I can see the comparison.

I hope this explains it a little bit.

~Denise
 

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I haven't had a puppy since my first dog Nero. But rescueing Murphy and Summer was still like raising them. When you get a rescue, their personality is usually buried under baggage. Whether they were street dogs (Summer), abandoned (Murphy), abused, etc., you have to get through all that and establish trust. Pups give that automatically, with rescues it has to be built.

The one thing I will say is that when your rescue comes out of his/her shell and shows you who THEY REALLY are, its a joy to behold.

Murphy had bad SA when we got him (3 homes in a month), it took years for him to get over it. He was always a happy, playful dog.

Summer was a timid, quiet, shy little girl. After a few months, she came to life, vocal, affectionate, very playful and smart. But, after 5 years, Summer still has fears of being left behind. Murphy understands that we will return and is Summer's security blanket. If Murphy is there, she is OK.
 

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I agree with Joe that building a relationship with a rescue is still like raising them. You have to show patience, as with a puppy, you have to give training, in some cases you have to housetrain.

I've had puppies, and I've had rescues. I can state without qualification that my love for the rescues is every bit as strong as the love for the ones raised from puppyhood. The bond is as strong, perhaps even stronger. /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/smile.gif
 

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I was lucky and managed to get the best of both...I adopted a puppy from a rescue. However, having friends who have rescued their dogs, I can say that bond is still there. Instead of it growing over the puppy stages and craziness as they grow, it grows as you earn the rescue's trust and bring their true personality out. Plus, it's very rewarding to know that you saved the life of that rescued pup. The road to that bond may be different, but it leads to the same place!
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for your replies, very much appreciated.

I'm very nervous about the prospect of a rescue as you can tell but I know that I don't want another puppy.

I'm still deep in thought about it and will give myself some more time to think before I make any decision. Plus I need to convince hubby that it's a good idea :rolleyes:

We have had a lot of difficult times this last year. First my dad died, then Lilly died, then my mum had a heart attack, then mum had a triple heart bypass operation, then a very close friend of mine ended our friendship because I couldn't give her what she wanted. It's been a rollercoaster 14 months but I can see the light at the end of the tunnel now. The fact that it's been 12 months since Lilly died and I can smile about the happy memories now without breaking down all the time is lifting my heavy heart.

But I'm sure that hubby thinks that getting another dog is not wise. But I'm not sure that Rosa is happy on her own. She has changed, she is so clingy and needy and whins and cry's when I can't be with her all the time and seems more disobediant. I think the disobediance might be attention seeking but I can't give her anymore attention than she already gets, which is lots trust me. I take her to work all day or if I'm at home she is with me all day. She gets 2 hours exercise a day plus lots of love, affection, play and interaction at home but if I so much as nip to the toilet she starts to cry. My neighbours say she doesn't make a single sound if ever I leave her, it's only when I'm with her she wants my constant attention...she never used to be like this /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/confused.gif

Maybe a canine buddy is what she needs again
 

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It does sound like Rosa might be lonely and need a buddy. I know that the few times when we have taken out two of our three dogs and left one behind the one that is left behind is definitely more agitated and relieved when we get back than if we take one and leave two behind... which I think proves the point. And when we are not there they always end up together - even though when we are around they may be scattered around the house. Popcorn and Moose also obviously get so much enjoyment playing with each other - often just spontaneously one will go over and head-butt the other or bite the other's leg and then the game is on!

As for your concerns about a rescue, I can vouch threefold for what everyone else has said. We adopted Booker at 3 1/2 and she didn't have any issues with becoming a member of a new household that I could see (and I was worried in particular that she would miss her old owners - but I never saw it). She was also old enough when we got her to have been 100% house trained and pretty laid back - although I think some of the laid-backedness is just her nature. But she definitely was a good first dog for me since she basically fit in immediately without any real issues at all. And I certainly fell 100% in love with her RIGHT away!

Moosie was adoped at 1 1/2. He was a bit more challenging at the start - Marc says that walking him at first was like flying a kite (I opted to stay with walking Booker...) but again I'm not sure if that is just because he was younger or because he has more exuberance naturally, or perhaps he came with more baggage. But it really didn't take more than a few days before he was completely integrated into our family and we were SOOO in love with him.

We adopted Popcorn at about 7 months and she was definitely the biggest challenge for us because she was so terrified of everything. But that being said, she needed us even more than the others to be her safety zone - so in a way her fear of the outside world helped us to bond with us even more strongly and quickly than the other two as within the first day she had decided that the only 100% safe place in the world was to be on one of our laps. She also required more work on housetraining but I think that was less due to age and more to her fear, plus her background as, most likely, an outside hunting dog... All in all, though, I'm glad she was our third and not our first rescue - but I still can tell from the puppy stories on here that what we went through with her was NOTHING compared to what people go through with a baby puppy!

I do wish we had at least SEEN them all as puppies (although we do have some puppy pictures of Booker from her former owner which I treasure) - but I really can't say that I regret the fact the we didn't have them as puppies. For all of them I also cannot imagine how they could possibly be more bonded to us than they are - and vice versa...
 

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Not a daft question at all. /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/wink.gif

Both my girls are rescues, we got Willow at 14 months and Katie at 16 months. We got them both very soon after losing our 15yr old beagle Pepper to liver failure. Never thought I could love another beagle (never mind two!!) the way I loved Pepper....how wrong I was. :rolleyes: My girls characters and personalities came through really quickly and I love them both in very different ways, but cant imagine life without them. Theyre wonderful Beagles and I love them dearly...despite their naughtiness. /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/laugh.gif

There is continual evidence of baggage with Willow but thats what makes her unique....shes balmy - we have a saying in our house...Willow wouldnt be Willow if she wasnt Willow!!

Angela
 

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Hi I have 2 rescued Basset hounds and they are the first dogs that I have rescued.Rupert was only 6 months when we got him and he is still mad at 2 years but is very endearing.Yes we do wonder about his past and he does have issues but maybe he would have had them anyway,who knows?
Precious was about 3 when we got her and is an ex breeding bitch,she settled straight in and within a couple of weeks had her paws firmly under the table.It did take a while for us to get used to having a new dog in the house but I think that would still of happened with a young puppy. Our next dog will almost certainly be a rescue but not sure yet what breed,it depends on what is available at the time.
 

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Jennifer,
After the year you've been through, rescuing/adopting would be the best medicine! Imagine your joy and accomplishment at bringing happiness and love to the life of another creature.
When I rescued Calvin, I had become an empty nester; people thought I was nuts to 'finally' have freedome to travel and have no worries (our labrador was PTS just before my son graduated).
I lived that way for four months, and on Christmas Eve, Calvin came home with me from the humane society.
I don't know if I was just lucky, but he was perfect! It took about a month before his true personality emerged.....and I hit the jackpot.I still deal with some baggage issues, but nothing major. I can't imagine life without him.
I might have rescued HIM, but he saved ME!

Go for it! Sometimes it doesn't work, but more often it does........
 

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I do think it feels different to take in a rescue rather than a puppy, but in a good way. You have such a good feeling giving them the life that they deserve but didn't have before, and the dogs themselves are very thankful for that as well.

Our first beagle Spooky was a puppy when he came to us, our second (Monty) and third (Spencer) beagles were both rescues, Monty was 6 months when we got him and Spencer 2.5 years. The bond between us and our dogs is just as good as with Spooky when he was alive, and now even better, since Monty has been here longer that Spooky was with us, and therefore has had more time to bond.

With Monty it took about a month before his true personality came through. Spencer is needing a little more time (he's been with us about two months), since he is more tentative and careful than Monty.

I think especially since you are thinking that your Beagle would like a companion, it's a good choice to take in a rescue that is at a similar age, since the dogs when then be at the same level and will have the same "interests." And having such a hard year yourself I'm sure it will do you good taking another dog into your life, especially a rescue who probably had a similarly bad year (or life) and is also needing some comfort, love and security.

My boyfriend was also rather skeptical, as I told him that I wanted to get a second dog. It took a long time to convince him. But now that Spencer is here he wouldnt give him up for the world and just loves cuddling with him in bed.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Thank you everyone and thanks for the link Barking Mad /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/smile.gif

I'm not sure what to do yet and I may get a Basset rather than a Beagle. I'd be looking for one that is around Rosa's age. If I didn't have Rosa I would like to get a senior Beagle or Basset but if I do I don't want a situation where the rescue is too old to keep up with Rosa (who still behaves like a puppy on a walk).

Ideally I'd like to be able to walk them together but a tired old dog would not appreciate Rosa's exuberance so I think one aged within about 2 years either way of Rosas age which is 6. Do you think that is a good idea?

I'd love to give a very senior hound of say 10 yrs + a warm comfortable place in front of my fire but I think it would be a mis-match with Rosa. She is very puppish and very lively still.
 

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Hi Jennifer
Bassets and Beagles go well together.My Bassets are 2 and 3ish and the Beagle is 11.They all walk at least 1 and a half hours a day.The Bassets play together and the Beagle supervises.
The only difference seems to be that Bassets are even more stubborn than Beagles. /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/mad.gif
Also if you are looking at general rescue centers for your new dog most will insist that your present dog has been neutered even if your new rescue has already been done.
Yvonne
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Thanks Vonny /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/smile.gif

Yeah I was aware that Bassets are worse than Beagles for their selective deafness, but i bet they can hear the fridge door opening can't they :hi:
 

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I think Wayfarer's mother got her Basset through the basset rescue so they might have some contact details. I think bassets are great with beags. The good thing about Rosa being 6 is if you get a younger dog then Rosa will show it the ropes.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Thanks Iain, I've found the Basset Hound Welfare website and got a phone number for the representative in my area. I shall give them a call next week after I've had more time to think and chat with hubby.

I wonder how Wayfarers mum is getting on with their new addition!!


Of course when you decide to get a rescue you can't be too fussy about what you want but ideally yep I would like one of about 3-4 years old so that Rosa is the grown up.
 

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Hi Jennifer
I know it's a long way from you but Many Tears Rescue in Camarthanshire Wales quite often get ex breeding Bassets in,they homevet and insist that the whole family visit the dog,they also neuter,microchip and vax all dogs. Both mine came from there and are lovely :sign20:
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Thanks Vonny for the link.

I have been and had a look at their website but as they are so far away I'll probably only contact them if my local representative suggests it.

I still haven't talked to hubby about it yet...it's on my list of scary things to do this weekend :holyshit:
 

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Bassets WILL fit through a doggie door. Trust me on this :animal18: :rolleyes:
 
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