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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Winston's biting on me has become more than a nusience. He bites so hard that I cry, and I can't even sit down to watch TV or relax. Sometimes he even comes up from behind me and jumps up to bite my arms or hands.
It's so bad that my perfume of choice is bitter apple.
He never seems to do this to my husband, and only does it sometimes to my daughters.
I thought he wanted attention or something but if I try to play with him when he starts biting he doesn't want to play, just keeps biting. If we are playing and starts biting, he stops playing.
I am very concerned that this isn't going to stop or he's going to bite someone so hard that skin or worse, a bone gets broken.
Please give me any ideas. If I haven't tried it yet I will and If I have I'll try it again.
 

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Have you tried really shouting at him when his biting gets out of hand? Murphy has gotten carried away a couple times and, in my loudest and meanest voice really unleash on him for about 5 seconds. He's to the point where if he does start getting carried away when playing all I have to do is start to raise my voice and he stops.
 

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I think less attention rather than more is needed here. Stop playing with him the moment he bites and ignore him.

I don't know if this is a good idea or not, but maybe if you put a soft muzzle on him he may get the idea. How old is he? Could he need something hard to chew on?

I hope others have some good ideas. This behavior is very hurtful and causes the family to turn away from him, which isn't what anyone wants to happen.

Good luck,
Monica and Daisy:)
 

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Have you tried spraying him with a water bottle when he starts biting? We haven't had this particular issue with our pack but I recall reading here that spraying with water was effective because it shocks them enough that they stop what they are doing.
 

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I totally understand your frustration - been there, done that a few times. You NEED to get this stopped, NOW. This is a big reason Beagle pups end up in shelters and rescues - this behavior starts out cute but soon the owners tire of it and either can't get it stopped or just plain get tired of dealing with it.

You need to control play time, totally. The very second Winston starts biting, stop - try using the sound EH! and make it a loud EH and hi pitched. If you can, put him in another room - a time out, each time he tries to bite. If you can;t put him in a different room then make sure he can't get a hold of your fingers - curl your hands in a ball and put them behind your bak. Walk away from him. (don't run - he'll think it is a game).

I hope some of that helps - let us know how things are.

Oh yea, if you have used the word NO - even yelling it loudly won't help now because he is used to it. That's why EH or a high pitched sound of some kind usually works - it is different and not used to it.
 

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We had a great tv presentation on bad behaviors by dogs. They addressed this subject by saying, in your strongest voice say NO, and then ignore them, if they continue, make sure that they are isolated. If they jump up on you, put your knee up at throat level, that is like a bite on the neck from mom for them. We have to assume the alpha position and not be so cute to them....I've tried it with Casie, as he started biting Cobi and now me...it's working, but it takes consistency.
 

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I've done the loud pitched squeel that victoria stillwell (sp?) suggests and it works, over time you can substitute for ouch, etc, and use that to ur advantage when teaching let it go for items etc. i think it startles them, and finally they understand that the keyword means they can't have their mouth around it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks for your suggestions so far. I WILL TRY ALL OF THEM EVEN THE ONES I'VE TRIED!
I've tried the water bottle, it worked great at first but now he drinks out of it like a water fountain.
My hubby thinks he likes my high pitched voice and condemns me for using it. But I still do. He doesn't seem to react to screaming or noises.
I'm into the ignore right now, but I end up literally standing in a kitchen corner for hours a day.
He's 10 months and he has plenty of hard things to chew (and some soft ones he destuffs)
I have him in beginner classes at pet smart but after the first class, I am questioning how well that's going to help.
 

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I had to deal with this with my dane puppy. She would love to bite my son (he is 5) and I had to put a stop to it immediately. A dane puppy is a lot larger than a beagle puppy and does a lot more damage when they bite.

To stop this behavior was a chore, it took a good 2 weeks for her to get the idea. We would let out our loudest yelp we could and then crate her immediately. She soon associated the yelp with a timeout in her crate. Once she settled down she was allowed out. After you yelp, don't say another word and pick him up and put him in a crate. The crate can be used for timeouts. When you do a timeout only leave the puppy in there until he settles down. Once settled then he can come back out. The key is to be consistent (the whole family has to follow through.)
 

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Originally Posted By: Winston's MomI've tried the water bottle, it worked great at first but now he drinks out of it like a water fountain.
A possible alternative to the water bottle is a can of compressed air. The stuff you use to dust your computer can really surprise a puppy if he's used to a squirt of water.

Good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
He hates his crate! I think I'll try that. I only use it now when we are all out of the house. Do you think that will confuse him if I start using it for Time Out?
 

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Biting was one of the first things we worked on with Bodie. As a puppy he wanted to chew on everything he could find. If we were playing with him and he bit too hard we'd yell Ouch!, get up and ignore him. After a few minutes we'd go back and resume playing. After a short period of time he learned not to bit so much. He rarely bites now and if he does we do the same thing.
 

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Originally Posted By: Winston's MomHe hates his crate! I think I'll try that. I only use it now when we are all out of the house. Do you think that will confuse him if I start using it for Time Out?
I think it depends on the dog. I've heard conflicting reports. For us, we do actually use it as time out and JoJo can differentiate (sp) between her time-outs and her time to go into the crate when we leave. Time-outs, at least for us, are meant to give her a chance to calm down.

She's been doing some mouthing lately and has bitten the kids a few times, even jumping them from behind and biting their bums. She's also been biting the cat...which I'm not liking either.
She gets told NO very loudly and put into her crate to settle down. If we're playing and she bites, my husband sometimes will grab her mouth lightly and say no, then make her take a break.
We also praise her lots when she's doing the right things, like playing nicely.
 

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You have to stay firm. I think the immediate halt in play and affection with a loud NO, is the best treatment.You have to be alpha 'dog' in his eyes. Start with the basics, like making sure you go through a door before him. Dont let him pull on the leash.Ignore him when you first enter the room he is in.
 

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Originally Posted By: Winston's MomHe hates his crate! I think I'll try that. I only use it now when we are all out of the house. Do you think that will confuse him if I start using it for Time Out?
Totti gets time outs in his crate, but he also sleeps in it at his free will and goes in there when he is left alone. He still knows it's his safe haven even if we put him in there to calm him down.

As for the biting thing, we had this problem too when we first got Totti. Ignoring helped, as did a firm NO! after each nip. He was about 8 months when he did this. My mom worried he wouldn't stop, but now he'll never close his mouth over our fingers or hands. Beagle pups, as do all pups, test their limits to see how far they can go.
 
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