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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
For those who haven't read my intro, we recently took in a beagle. We think he's about 9 months old, as he is about 12-13" high at shoulders and his testicles have not completely dropped yet. He is a very sweet dog, esp once he's inside laying on our couch... LOL. The biggest issues we've faced are 1. his baying/barking at night when we put him in the back yard (with our other dog), 2. he won't come to you unless he feels like it, 3. won't listen to much of anything really, esp if it's something he doesn't want to do, like get off the couch.
As for 1. we ended up letting both the dogs inside one night when we just couldn't take it anymore and he's been perfect. No chewed up toys/furniture, no pee or poop on the floor. So as long as he's a good dog I have no problem with him being inside at night.
But 2. and 3. we still need help with. I just got a clicker and have looked up info on clicker training, but so far haven't been able to do it because I can't find a dog treat he likes. I've tried 2 kinds of biscuits, a chewy steak treat, a rawhide bone, a beef rawhide stick... nothings worked so far. Very weird!! lol
Any ideas on how to get him to listen better?
Thanks in advance!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Here's a picture of Moochie -- I know he's at least some beagle, but I don't know if he's full beagle, as I've never had one before. We think he's such a cutie either way!
 

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Here's a picture of Moochie -- I know he's at least some beagle, but I don't know if he's full beagle, as I've never had one before. We think he's such a cutie either way!

He looks all beagle to me. From your description of your problems with him, he sounds like a beagle too. My beags go absolutely crazy about meaty treats. A training treat that has a meat smell works wonder's. Even use hot dogs chopped up into small peices. That actually would be cheeper than regular dog treats.

Beagles are very smart, but they do things because it is in their interest, not just yours. When you ask them to do something, they want to know whats in it for them. The trick is to convince them that what you want them to do is what they want to do.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
So hot dogs would be ok for him as a treat? I was afraid to give him those since they have so much sodium. Glad to hear that's ok because he LOVES hot dogs! :)
Thanks for the help!!
 

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Hi there!

Moochie is adorable. Just thought I'd let you know that I use hot dogs all the time for training treats. I make them small though. Slices of hot dog that are quartered, so they are really teeny tiny. Works like a charm for my guy. Good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Great - will do!
I am thinking about putting an underground fence around our front yard so the dogs will have more room to play. Do these work well for beagles?
Also, for those that have one, how does it work if you have a cement driveway that runs through an area you want included?

Thanks for all the help! I want us all to be happy to have Moochie here, ya know? :)
 

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Hi to you and Moochie,
Moochie looks like a Beag to me too:)

ohhhhh hotdogs yum

I also agree what Tucker posted---------->Beagles are very smart, but they do things because it is in their interest, not just yours. When you ask them to do something, they want to know whats in it for them. The trick is to convince them that what you want them to do is what they want to do.

lol sooooooo true
 

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It takes a lot of patience, positive reinforcement, and consistency. That is the best advice I can give b/c that is what worked/works for us. Each dog is different so some may catch on quicker than others. We see that among our three beags.

With regard to the invisible fence, I do not have experience with it but have heard it is not a good containment for beagles. They follow their noses no matter what! If they get on a good scent there may be no stopping them! Personally, after what I've read, I would not trust one.

But of course, maybe someone out there has had success with one?
 

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Wow...that is one adorable beagle. He really looks like one to me.

Like someone else has said, it looks like a beagle and sounds like one too.

I have found with my beagle, it just tooook a lot of time and patience. She still won't listen to everything I tell her, but for the most part she is pretty good about it.

The barking and howling though....I think that one might be unavoidable.
 

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Another thing....watch out for epilepsy. I guess the breed is prone to have it sometimes, and Priscilla (my beagle) has it. :(
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Wow... epilepsy... that must be heartbreaking. I'm sorry. :( Thanks for the advice everyone. It looks like we're in for an interesting ride! :) Maybe I'll figure out some other way to add a more secure area for him to play outside. Seems like the underground fence isn't such a good idea.
 

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Yeah..the seizures are a big bummer and they are heartbreaking to watch, but other than that she is a happy dog so I just make sure to comfort her while she is having one.

I kept my beagle in a fenced in yard so she could play with her "brother" (my German Shepherd/something tall mix Elvis) and it turns out she was an escape artist. She would make the smallest hole and escape. What I do now is use a trie out while she is in the fence. I got one that is long enough for her to be able to run around and explore a bit and play, but keeps her from getting to the fence. While I don't support tieing a dog outside as a way to keep your animal, she is only out for an hour or two at the longest and she can still be witht he other dogs. I figure it is a lot better than her running away. Trying to hunt for a beagle is a pain in the a$$ and so is chasing one down...lol.
 

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Oh...I just reread your original post, and you're having trouble finding a treat your beagle likes?!?!?!?!?! I wish I had that problem...I can't find anything mine won't eat except for pickles. :p
 

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Beagle training can be a difficult process, but this doesn’t mean you should give in to your dog’s demands and let him do whatever he wants. He needs to know that you are the master and “pack leader”. You can not allow your dog to walk over you, or you will lose control over him.


This is why you need to enroll your Beagle into an obedience class, so you can effectively learn how to train him.

Obedience class – Take your Beagle to obedience class as soon as he meets the age requirement. Obedience training will help teach your dog that you are the boss, and will provide you with the skills and confidence to train your dog with efficiency.
Training consistency – Because Beagles are a stubborn breed to train, you will need to be firm and consistent with training. That being said, you also need to know when to give your dog a break. Puppies have short attention spans. You need to be able to hold their interest, and get them excited about wanting to do your command.
Discipline – Your Beagle will need to be disciplined when he does something wrong or does not listen to you. However, this doesn’t mean you should shout at your dog. You simply look at him straight in the eye and say in a firm tone “No”. You should then proceed to show him the correct way, and immediately praise him when he does it. Discipline should start as a puppy. Note: Never hit your Beagle!
Praise, Praise, Praise! – When your Beagle successfully follows your command or pleases you, praise him for it, and do it all the time. He will be happy when he knows he has made you happy.
Do you think you’re all set for Beagle training? To test this theory, why not try teaching your Beagle the “Come” command by following the guidelines provided below.
Beagle Training – The “Come” Command
The “Come” command can be one of the most difficult commands to teach your Beagle, but it is also one of the most important for him to learn. Thus, you need to have patience when teaching this command and you can’t give up.
Now, before we jump right into the technique, you first need to understand that there are times when you should not use the “Come” command.
1 Don’t call your Beagle to come if you intend to give him a bath, pill or for grooming. Go and get your dog. You don’t want him to associate the “Come” command with a negative experience.
2 Don’t call your Beagle when you can’t reinforce the command or he doesn’t know how to respond to it. You are only teaching your Beagle to ignore the command in the future from lack of understanding and direction.
3 Don’t use the word “Come” for the command if you notice that your dog has got into the habit of ignoring it. Instead, use a different word such as “Here” or “Front” when training.
O.K., now we’re all set. Here’s how to teach the command:
1. Make sure you have enough treats with you to give as a reward, and take your Beagle with you to a quiet room that won’t interest your dog, and is large enough for you to take a few steps away from your dog.
2. When your dog is in front of you and is not looking at you, say his name in a high-pitched, enthusiastic voice, immediately followed by the word “Come!” As soon as he starts to respond to you, back up quickly, so he has to run to catch you. Once he reaches you, lure him into a sitting position and give him a treat and lots of praise. Repeat this lesson until he is running up to you, as soon as you call. Take a nice break.
3. When the break is over, repeat the above step. However, this time, before you give him the treat, take hold of his collar as he sits. Feed him the treat as you hold on to him. Once he is done, release his collar and say to him “Go play!” The point to the step of holding on to his collar and then releasing him is to give you control of your dog when he comes to you. Without this control, your Beagle will likely only run circles around you when he comes to you. By making him sit you have his attention. Repeat this lesson until your Beagle will sit in front of you and you can take his collar every time when you call him.
4. Once you are confident with his understanding, try the command in different areas of your house, where there are more distractions. Eventually you will want to move outside in your backyard where it is well fenced and your dog can not escape.
While you don’t necessarily want to teach your Beagle to come so you can let him off the leash, you wan to have him understand this command so you have control over the situation should he ever come lose, or for safety reasons.
 

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Yep, I'm thinking he's got to be a beagle. AND everyone who has said that they do what it is it for them, is 100% correct. We have had three beagles, and as adorable, loving and cooperative as they could be, it was always about them --- to them. We have used green beans, raw or canned cut small, hot dogs, small carrot pieces, dog treats, dog snacks, bananas, apples etc all to get them to do what we want...one day they like the treat, the next day, they like something else, so it's always about them.

I wouldn't trust the underground fence with a beagle. As Ros Cole said, once the nose is on, the brain and ears are off....and I don't think an electric fence would stop them. So save the money and
make a new plan to keep them inside your yard.

They are wonderful little creatures who try the patience of God, but I think that's why only very special people get beagles...we have patience, or learn it quickly...and there is nothing like those big brown eyes that say you are my friend better than a beagles. Even when they are naughty, you are the main man.
 
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