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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Quinn and Grayson rarely make a sound unless they are yapping at each other during play or are put in their crates to sleep before they are ready. The one time they do get loud is when I leave one in the apartment while taking the other out to use the restroom. I know it is most likely a hey! I wanna go too! bark, but does anyone have any suggestions on how to get this to stop?

Smeagle suggested teaching them to bark on command, but I'm not exactly sure how to go about doing that. I'm sure all this barking/baying/whining will stop once we separate them, but I DO worry that it will only get worse....

The good news is that they have been successfully separated into two crates!
 

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Murphy used to have a real hissy fit when we'd leave him alone-even for a minute. As he has started to mature a little (he's now 9 months old) he no longer gets as upset when left alone.

It may just get better with time as they get used to occasionally being by themselves.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Unfortunately for them, they will have to get used to being separated from each other sooner than later, as they only have another month before Quinn comes to live with me. They seem to adjust pretty easily.

Thanks for the hope!
I look forward to them calming down a little bit. Right now, they're so difficult for just one person to take care of!
 

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Originally Posted By: Quinn&Grayson
Thanks for the hope!
I look forward to them calming down a little bit. Right now, they're so difficult for just one person to take care of!
I know what a challenge one Murphy was. I admire you for handling two at once!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
You know how it goes - you fall in love with one, and there's always another one who is just as adorable!

As they get a little older, they are getting better and more easy to tolerate. It's just difficult to keep two eyes on two dogs at the same time. It's easier when Evan is here because we can play with both at the same time.
 

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Originally Posted By: Quinn&Grayson
Smeagle suggested teaching them to bark on command, but I'm not exactly sure how to go about doing that. I'm sure all this barking/baying/whining will stop once we separate them, but I DO worry that it will only get worse....
LOL I'm pretty sure I didn't suggest that, you must have me confused with someone else


True separation anxiety is not as common as we think yet the term is thrown around a lot - and many dogs are misdiagnosed with SA, true SA is a lot more serious than just whinging/barking.

At this young age I would suspect they are having a tantrum and just like you said above, whinging because they want to go too.

How much training have you been doing with them to get them used to being separated? I would be doing it at various times throughout the day, not just when they are going to be toilet training. Even if it's just leaving one crated while you take the other one into the next room or out into the hall for five minutes or less. Reward them with a treat and/or praise when they are quiet and ignore any howling/barking/baying or whining. Giving them attention for any of that behaviour will only reinforce it and teach them that it is behaviour they can win with.

Even if you start by leaving them on their own for less than five minutes and coming back in when they are quiet. Work up to bigger increments of time. This is sadly a fairly common problem when you take on litter mates or have two pups at the same time which is why it can be a lot more work for you.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Sorry - Maybe I didn't confuse you with someone else. I did a lotttttttt of reading in the beginning! I thought you had said something in my initial thread about raising littermates...

ANYWAY thanks for your advice. When we separate them, but each of them has one of us, they don't get vocal in their angst. Usually, they look around a bit, but they get over it. If one of them is left alone while the other goes out, THAT is when they get vocal. I know it's been said that beagles are not apartment dogs, but they are in an apartment, and I know Evan worries about their volume disturbing the neighbors.

When I'm not here, he's taken them on walks separately.

I've been doing the praising and treat-giving if I come back from taking one puppy out, and the other is quiet.

I honestly don't think we have thought to take one out and leave the other one crated during play time....it seems they do a little better when they aren't crated, but are left with something to play with.
 

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one thing im noticing is that as they get older, they do change habits. some get better, some worse. mine dont whine at all now, but now they bark at everything that gets within a quarter mile. and not agressively, no hair up or anything, just tail wagging aroooo, arooooooooo.
c.
 

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Originally Posted By: Quinn&Grayson

I honestly don't think we have thought to take one out and leave the other one crated during play time....it seems they do a little better when they aren't crated, but are left with something to play with.
I only suggested crating one of them so they can get used to having short periods of time on their own - i.e. crate one in one room and take the other into the next room and do some training for a few minutes. Then swap them over etc. Do it a few times a day, they have to get used to being on their own and the more often you do it (even for 3-5 minutes at a time) the more they will get used to it. You don't have to use the crate, I just thought it might be a bit easier if you want to do short 'alone' time periods during the day.

Even with just one pup, I do the same thing to get them used to being on their own - I leave them in one room in a puppy pen or crate, so they get used to being on their own (crated) as this will sometimes be necessary.
 

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I'm a little confused. Why do they have to be separated?We have two beagles and they are always together. My husband often takes them out for walks together on his own. They are sometimes quite a handful, barking at other dogs on a walk, but no real problem.
 

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Originally Posted By: A doghouseI'm a little confused. Why do they have to be separated?We have two beagles and they are always together. My husband often takes them out for walks together on his own. They are sometimes quite a handful, barking at other dogs on a walk, but no real problem.
No one is saying they have to be separated all the time, but especially when you are raising litter mates you have to be careful they don't become so dependent on each other that they can't be separated without having anxiety.

Just like when we raise individual pups we get our dogs used to being on their own, the same goes for multi dog households.

Real separation anxiety can be a serious problem, I know dogs who have become too bonded to the other dog and if separated will injure itself so badly that it cuts itself up and bleeds, loses bladder control etc.

There can be occasions when you need to separate your dogs and this is why you have to get them used to being on their own sometimes.

The OP is already finding that the pups will howl, bark, whine and carry on when separated - if not handled properly now this WILL get worse as the dogs get older. Even though they are only throwing a tantrum now and it's not genuine separation anxiety, it is not a behaviour we want to encourage.
 

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Our two didn't meet until they were six years old and are not siblings, but they are inseparable. They still adore us but take comfort in one another when we leave them at home. I doubt that they would ever get used to being without the other by putting them in separate rooms or crates, it would make them go bonkers knowing their pal was nearby. Of course if you adopt a boy and girl which haven't been operated on, then you will be faced by problems twice a year when the bitch comes on heat, but unless you are a breeder that would be irresponsible anyway.
You may be correct in your advice, but I couldnt do it to Snoopy and Susi. We'll cross the bridge of separation anxiety when it arrives.
 

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Originally Posted By: A doghouseOur two didn't meet until they were six years old and are not siblings, but they are inseparable. They still adore us but take comfort in one another when we leave them at home. I doubt that they would ever get used to being without the other by putting them in separate rooms or crates, it would make them go bonkers knowing their pal was nearby. Of course if you adopt a boy and girl which haven't been operated on, then you will be faced by problems twice a year when the bitch comes on heat, but unless you are a breeder that would be irresponsible anyway.
You may be correct in your advice, but I couldnt do it to Snoopy and Susi. We'll cross the bridge of separation anxiety when it arrives.
Naturally, it's each to their own


I have three dogs, and two of them are more bonded than I would normally prefer. They are four years apart and Daisy (the younger one) is more attached Micha (the older one) than he is to her.

I have situations in my household where my dogs have to deal with being separated every day. I do a lot of one on one training during which time one dog will be out with me and the other two will be put in the house with no access to where I (or the other dog) are. The majority of time, I walk them separately, again they have to be used to being separated.

I might take one to the vet, or the groomer, or out to social meet or trial. There aren't many situations where I take all three out together and it would be very unpleasant for the dogs themselves if they were so unused to being on their own that they couldn't cope with it.

Not picking on you Doghouse - but your statement above that your dogs would go bonkers if you put one in another room or crate one and not the other is the very reason I suggested the OP get her pups used to be separated now, when they are still pups. When I have a new pup I get him used to being on his own by leaving the house for short periods of time and popping him in his crate for short periods of time, in a separate room to the one I am in. That way, when the time comes that I do need to leave the house for a longer time, or I need to put them in their crate for a real reason, they are used to happily being in their own company.


ETA: One of the most common problems I notice people posting about on this forum is separation anxiety or the fact that their beagles struggle being left on their own (usually they howl the house down or get destructive). IMO, this is largely to do with how we raise them as pups and there are a lot of things we can do when they are young to prevent this behaviour from developing as they get older.
 

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O.K. Smeagle, I think the situations are different. My husband and I are retired, so the dogs are seldom left alone at home. Only when we go shopping in hot weather, or out to a meal. They are fine without us as long as they are together. Dont forget Susi and Snoopy were used for research and were rescued at the same time. They had never met in their six years of hell but immediately bonded in the rescue centre.
For you its different, you are walking yours as part of a training for competitions? Ours go on walks for pleasure, for us as much as them.
Still I understand your theory regarding pups. A lot of people have trouble with single dogs and separation anxiety. So where have they gone wrong? How would you correct that behaviour in an older dog?
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Originally Posted By: A doghouseI'm a little confused. Why do they have to be separated?We have two beagles and they are always together. My husband often takes them out for walks together on his own. They are sometimes quite a handful, barking at other dogs on a walk, but no real problem.
They have to be separated because I'm moving back home at the end of this week. Evan is stationed down near San Diego; I actually live up in Northern California. I was only here for the summer. They'll eventually be reunited whenever he and I see each other each month, but I'm not going to leave him with two dogs to care for on his own. That's really tough to do. PLUS, I paid for my dog, so I do technically own her....
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Doghouse, I have to say I understand what Smeagle is saying....what's most important is, say, something happens to one of the dogs (Heaven forbid). Then, the problem will arise where the dogs will have to be separated from each other. If they aren't used to it, it may cause emotional problems for them.

Neither Evan nor I want to deal with having puppies who are destructive because they can't handle being alone without each other. I know a lot of people on this forum disagreed with me separately crating the puppies, but I've successfully done it (YAY!) now. The next step is to get them used to being alone, so that they do okay when I eventually HAVE to separate them because they will be living in different places.

I DO figure that separating them will probably be about as bad as bringing a new pup home from its litter/mother...I hope I'm right? Or will it end up being worse?
 

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If the dogs are soon going to be living in different homes, then that will make keeping them apart easier. They will get used to their individual homes and on the occasions that they meet it should be no problem. I thought you were moving in together with Evan. In a weeks time they will be separated anyway, thats the time to start intensive training with the 'home alone' situation.
All owners of more than one dog have the worry about what will happen when one dies. I used to have sleepless nights over Susi and Snoopy, but now I say, cross that bridge when one gets there.
When you collect your dog (Quinn?), treat it as you say, as if you are taking home a pup from its litter. There are several things you can do, a soft toy in her crate, warm hot-water bottle under the quilt. Give her plenty of attention.
You might be surprised in a few months, we know from when our last beagle had pups, two of them met later and took hardly any notice of one another.
Good luck anyway.
 

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Originally Posted By: A doghouseO.K. Smeagle, I think the situations are different. My husband and I are retired, so the dogs are seldom left alone at home. Only when we go shopping in hot weather, or out to a meal. They are fine without us as long as they are together. Dont forget Susi and Snoopy were used for research and were rescued at the same time. They had never met in their six years of hell but immediately bonded in the rescue centre.
For you its different, you are walking yours as part of a training for competitions? Ours go on walks for pleasure, for us as much as them.
I am training one of them for competition obedience but we still enjoy our walks and they are always for pleasure even if we stop half way and do some training
Some days we might just have a walk, although I consider any walk an opportunity to do training even if it's just basic commands like look and heel.

I prefer to walk them separately unless someone comes with me because I like to have one on one time with them and to be honest I find walking the two younger dogs together a bit of a PITA :p

Quote:
Still I understand your theory regarding pups. A lot of people have trouble with single dogs and separation anxiety. So where have they gone wrong? How would you correct that behaviour in an older dog?
It depends if the behaviour is genuine SA or a learnt behaviour and the dog is acting out of boredom etc. Like I said before genuine SA is actually quite uncommon, and very serious - it can be hard to manage.

People often go wrong when raising pups because they don't get them used to being on their own from an early age. Or, if they try to, the dog whines/cries/howls/barks and carries on and they give in to them - the dog learns it's behaviour they can win with and therefore it becomes a habit.
 
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