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Does anyone have any tips on how to deal with separation anxiety? Daisy has been fine up until the last month or so, and I see it getting a little worse each week. She goes crazy any time I leave. It's not as bad when my husband stays home, but she still has a hard time with it. Tonight I left to go to the store and my husband said that she cried and whined for 10 minutes or so even though he and my son were here. She threw up a little bit every morning last week after I left. She gets up with me and then I put her in her crate since my husband is usually still in bed. She doesn't get sick any other time, so that's why I think she's starting to go through some anxiety
 

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I would have a talk with Spencer's Mom... but Chloe has a mild (I think it is anyway) case of SA. She is destracted with a stuffed kong so I can go to work without her crying like crazy. when I come home I ignore her completely for 15 minutes, and only then I look at her. She got used to me not paying any attention to her when I come home, she just follows me a little and then curls up in the corner of the couch until I acknowledge her.
some days are better than others.... but still have to leave a wee wee pad by the door, as she pees from distress....
 

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I found this on Beagle Bay - hope it helps a little.

Dogs with separation anxiety exhibit extreme behavior problems when they are left alone. The most common behaviors are destruction of property (sometimes injuring themselves in the process), especially around doors or windows, howling and barking, and urination and defecation from distress. The destruction and house soiling is not an attempt to seek revenge on the owner for leaving, but is actually a panic response.

Separation anxiety sometimes happens when

A dog has never or rarely been left alone.
Following a long interval, such as a vacation, when dog and owner are constantly together.
After a traumatic event (in the dog's mind) such as time at a boarding kennel or shelter.
After a change in the family's routine, like a move to a new home, or a new person in the home.
Dogs that exhibit separation anxiety follow their owners around from room to room and become anxious even if a closed door separates them from the owner. They dislike spending time alone outdoors. They act depressed or anxious to your getting ready to leave the house.

For minor separation anxiety problems the following may be helpful:

Keep comings and goings low key. Ignore the dog the first few minutes when you come home, then calmly pet him.
Leave your dog with an article of clothing that has your scent on it-- one that you don't mind if it gets chewed on.
Provide enriched environment to keep the dog busy while alone. A Kong toy (even several) that is stuffed with soft food is good-- unstuffing it will occupy the dog. Hide favorite chewies in the house for the dog to find.
Sometimes leaving the radio or TV on is helpful, if the dog associates it with your presence. Or make a tape of family kitchen noise and play it while you are gone.
Provide aerobic exercise before leaving, but let the dog calm down before you leave. A tired dog will rest better.
Teach a sit or down stay (or use a tether) and gradually increase the distance you move away from your dog. Your goal is to move briefly out of sight while he remains in position. You want your dog to be comfortable about spending time apart from you.
Some dogs may be more comfortable in a crate - if the dog has first been trained to regard the crate as a safe haven. However, in many SA cases, confinement only worsens the dog's panic and hysteria.
Some dogs do better if they have a companion animal to keep them company. But this is not always successful, so be sure you actually want another pet.
Punishing a dog for destructiveness is not effective and may actually make things worse, since it could increase his anxiety.

Severe cases require systematic desensitization to being alone. This can take a long time. Sometimes veterinary prescribed drugs are used as a temporary measure along with the behavior modification program. Because a dog with severe separation anxiety can do damage to himself and/or your home, you may have to figure out some interim measures, such as leaving the dog at a daycare facility, or with a neighbor or family member.

Copyright © Pat Scott
 

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Good tips here! And an article of clothing like a sock or shirt
that you no longer plan on wearing...(as they might tear it apart
)When you are gone! Goober had a problem with SA, but he
outgrew it as he entered adulthood! Btw, it helped that I had
dog-loving neighbours @ the time! Thanks to Goober, he kept
Homer company when I was away & he never had that problem! Pop'
on the other hand has never had a puppy...(Rufus was close)as he
was barely 1 yr old when he adopted him as was the case with
Skipper, Duke & now Nibbler! But I have had Goober since he was
4 weeks old & Homer when he was 8 weeks old! (Goober is over 16
yrs old & Homer is over 6 yrs old now!(Thumbup)!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks Glenda! Those are some good tips. I tried this morning to keep everything low key when I was leaving. She didn't seem to be upset, so I'm hoping it went better.
 

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One of the things I did with JoJo (who came to me from my friend Deb, who had a VERY busy household) who DID suffer from separation anxiety - was to crate her with Chloe when I left. Chloe is my tiny nuturing beagle - she's never had pups - was spayed before she went into heat - but she LOVES puppies - all puppies - and is my babysitter when I need one. Unfortunately, not everyone has a babysitter like Chloers waiting in the wings. NW had a good idea too - with an article of clothing that you've worn - it's comforting to them.
 
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