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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm wondering if anyone has any experience with these rescue beagles that were used for research. The dogs were used in different experiments at a lab, many having a kidney removed. They are usually between 1 to 2 years old with limited life experiences(not much human contact, no kids or cats, very limited outside experiences, etc). I believe they are neither crate nor house trained. They were basically contained to lab rooms. Would a dog with this life make a good pet? Would there be health/mental issues down the road?

Thanks, Dwayne
 

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Dwayne, I don't have personal experience with beagles used for research - but I do know a little about it from listening to others. You're right, most of these dogs have little or no experience with people and life experiences. Most have never seen grass - people who adopt these babies need to be very patient with them. One of my neighbors adopted one from our local university, but kept it only a short time - she just wasn't prepared for a beagle - and especially one who was not socialized. I live near a large university with a vet teaching hospital. Several years ago a friend who worked there called in a panic - Glenda, I need your help to find homes for 100 beagles who were used in research. Since I co-manage a beagle group (on MSN and now Yuku), I managed to find homes for quite a few of these dogs. It just happened to be the Christmas holiday - and when I tried to contact the university to let them know that I could help, I got a major run around (I don't know WHAT you're talking about, we don't have any beagles here) - it turns out that they are concerned about repercusions by some of the aniamal rights groups and won't ADMIT to having the dogs. They will place them through _______ Beagle Rescue - so if you're interested in one of these special babies, you might contact your local beagle rescue group. I have a lot of beagle experience - and I'm not trying to discourage you - but beagles can be a little difficult if you're not familiar with the breed. I would hesitate to take one of these special babies on without experience with the breed. I know there are some people here who have adopted research beagles - I'm sure they can give you more insight. Future problems? Possibly - depending on what kinds of research they were used for. This is a very sore subject with me - after my experiences with the university. I want to rescue them all. The university only admitted to having a FEW that were used for food trials (which in themselves can be damaging to dogs). My friend who worked there told me that they were used in other experiments - as were other animals - including being given cancer, etc. I'm sure those dogs would be euthanized and not adopted. Okay, off my soap box! Check with your local beagle rescue group - they would have more info about these special needs dogs.
And whatever you decide, we're all here for you.
 

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One of our members, A Doghouse has two rescued research beagles. If you wanted to PM her, she can probably give you a lot of insight as to the challenges of research rescues.
 

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Hi Dwayne, Only just seen your message.
We adopted Susi and Snoopy Xmas 2005 and have never regretted it. We do believe it is better that rescues be adopted in pairs (a male and female if possible) obviously neutered. It sounds ideal with a large garden, as long as the garden (backyard) is securely fenced off. Are the rescue beagles ex research beagles? They come with baggage and take longer to housetrain, but do become 'normal'. Is someone at home, or will the dog/dogs be left alone a lot?
Susi and Snoopy are adorable and seem to have shaken their baggage (bad memories) off. They are very good with people.
If you go ahead then plan to choose a time when you have no visitors, just the immediate family. It is important that they are left in peace at the beginning-our two slept the first few days, apart from eating and going to the garden for the toilet.
NEVER take them out without them being securely on a lead (leash), best being with a harness, as collars can be slipped. If a rescue is shocked by something then it can run off in a panic and not find its way home. Beagles shouldnt be off leash anyway, due to their hunting instincts. Apart from in a secure garden of course.
After a few ups and downs you will be amazed how well things can go.
I dont think you need worry about health issues. Dogs are normally only released to rescue centres if they are fit. Mental issues will be temporary. Most research beagles are put down, so those who do land at rescue centres are lucky.
If you have any other questions then feel free to ask.
Hope you decide to go ahead
Angela
_________________________
Doghouse
Susi and Snoopy are ex research beagles.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Yes, these are research beagles. I'm concerned with what research has been done to them. The most common thing seems to be having a kidney removed. Is that a major issue, having 1 kidney? I'm also concerned about any dog that has been imprisioned for the first year of it's life. I wonder what mental issues come along with that. I really wasn't planning on getting 2 dogs but I understand where that would be a benefit.
 

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Dwayne, Susi and Snoopy spent the first 6 years in research and have still managed to shake off their baggage. Neither of them had a kidney removed but plenty of other horrid things done to them. Susi had to produce one litter after another, whilst being treated with pesticides. They then killed the pups to see what damage had been caused. For this reason we cant have soft toys in the house or she goes all broody.
Usually a rescue centre will check you out. They came and inspected our house and garden, they also questioned us a long time and were keen to answer any questions we had. The rescue centre we got them from also made us sign a contract that we would not pass the dogs on to anyone else and we are not allowed to have them euthanised without their consent. It is important that an ex research beagle goes to a forever home.
Things ours couldnt do:
Susi couldnt use stairs, we had to teach her, took a few weeks.
Neither played with toys. They only recently have started to play chase with one another, still dont play with us (but adore going for walks).
Susi would nearly jump out of her skin if we made a sudden noise, dropped something etc. She has calmed down a lot but doesnt like it if someone comes up behind her (when shes eating for instance).
Susi took two years to fully houstrain, she would pee on carpets, particularly in someone elses home! Snoopy was clean straight away and only occasionally 'marked' a place, as male dogs do.
That website looks interesting, that Jassy mentioned, I'll take a closer look at it.
Angela
 
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