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Ok - some people can get their Beagles to do a really good recall or at least stop. When we are in the backyard or some other closed in space I can get Shiloh and Shasta to do a good come when called when I am working with them. I can get them in the house altho with Shiloh it's usually at his speed and when he is ready unless I force the issue with going to get him in.

But if I am out for a walk with Shiloh B. and he sees a bunny, I may end up on the ground after struggling with him some - once that happens, there is a good chance he is going to get loose and one that happens, it can be up to 2 hours before I can get him - he suddenly becomes deaf (I have not had that experience yet with Shasta since the hunting instinct is not as strong). The last time Shiloh B. and I went for a walk - last Wednesday evening, he did pretty good and I stayed uprite after managing to get him away from the first bunny he saw (I was able to pull him away from his distraction and kept on walking away from the bunny). However it was the second bunny that spelled disaster for us - well for me since Mr. Shiloh got what he wanted -freedom but I ended up on the ground with him fighting to get loose - which he eventually did. Even when I would call him, he would not stop. By the way, I wasn't hurt -and eventually I did get him - after following him for an hour and a half. But we have not been for a walk since nor do I intend to take him for one until I get the no-slip Martingale collar.
 

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I can completely understand the rabbit thing. My two are like that as well. Rocky is even sometimes bad if he sees a plastic decoration animal. LOL I've started using treats as a distraction and rewarding them when they either ignore or have only minor reactions to animals, etc. It helps but it just takes time and practice.
 

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Daisy is small, so I do not have a problem keeping hold while she is on leash. However, if she manages to escape from the yard, (fence jumper/climber/squeezer-outer), fuggedaboudit. I am new to beagles, but I believe that some have a much more intense hunting instinct and pretty much NOTHING will get them to listen if they are on a scent or chase.

One thing that MIGHT help is to get a citronella collar. It will emit a puff of citronella right in front of your dog when he starts to bark/yelp while hunting. This typically will startle the heck out of the dog, and distract it enough to break the spell of hunting so you can get control back. The collar works on three senses: smell, sight & sound. (citronella scent, visible mist, and the sound of the spray coming out).

I got one to stop Daisy from her insane barking at other dogs or whatever on walks. She only set it off a few times before she simply stopped barking while it was on her. This is not to say that she is safe off-leash, that will NEVER happen, and your guy will likely never be trustworthy either. But a citronella collar might be a good thing to have in your Beagle Arsenal


I got it on eBay - the seller linked below had a great price and sometimes he has auctions that come with an extra refill.
Citronella Collar

Footnote: I have often wanted to try putting it on her and just letting her out the door, to see if it would work to stop her from taking off like she usually would, but I'm too nervous to take a chance. I do suspect it would work though!
 

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I am not keen on citronella collars as they have a much lower rate of success than other collars. This is largely due to;

- Not every dog will find the spray aversive enough to break their 'drive' when they are barking/scenting etc
- The smell of citronella tends to hang around on their fur and the dog can get confused as to what it is being corrected for, as the aversive (the smell) continues to punish the dog for as long as the dog can smell it.

If you were going to use a method like that to teach recall, you are better off getting an e-collar and doing low stim work (low stim being the equivalent to a flea bite) coupled with a bit of drive training too. The e-collars have a much higher rate of success, and surprisingly to some people, can be less aversive to the dog than citronella collars as the stim only lasts for a second.
 
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