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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all.

I hope you don't mind me asking but my question is.
Would you recommend a Beagle as a first dog?

stacy
 

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<span style="font-size: 11pt">Questions here are always welcome - especially when it concerns being a responsible pet parent.

When I got Shiloh B. - my first Beagle - he was only 7 and a half weeks. BUT I had raised dogs for most of my life - just not Beagles - it was a HUGE learning experience for both of us.

With that said, no - I'm sorry but I would not <span style="text-decoration: underline">UNLESS</span>you got an older Beagle - one that is already housebroke and through the chewing stage. Beagles are great companion animals and family dogs - but not for first time dog owners, especially if that Beagle is a puppy. I WOULD recommend an older Beagle as a first dog - and there are plenty out there needing a good loving home. Too many Beagles end up in shelters and rescues or out on the streets because people hear about them being great family dogs and good for kids. So they may get a puppy that their little Katie can grow up with - little Katie is 2 years old and the puppy is 8 weeks. Mom and Dad don't know how sharp puppies teeth are and how rambunctious they can get. They may not take the puppy to obedience classes where it learns how to control that rambunctious behavior and not to chew except on puppy toys. Not knowing any better, one day little Katie is playing with the puppy and gleefully runs from it - not knowing that will only encourage the puppy to chase her. The puppy is now a few months old as it jumps and runs around - it jumps on little Katie - the puppy is being it's usual puppy self but Katie is knocked to the floor and starts to cry. Mom & dad didn't see everything - they just see their child, laying on the floor crying and an out of control pup running around the room, barking and yapping. Yes, this does happen and then mom & dad decide the now several month old Beagle pup needs to go away and there is now one more Beagle pup in a shelter.

Ok, that was the bad scenario - there can be a good one. But even with an older Beagle, adopted from a shelter or rescue - I would still recommend an obedience class - especially if it is a first dog. You will learn how to be the leader of your pack or the alpha and the Beagle will learn the alpha is YOU - that you are the bearer of all things good and positive. Obedience classes are also a good way to strengthen further the bond between you and your Beagle.

When Shiloh B. was still a pup - I did have a few people tell me that maybe I should give him up and get a different breed - I am so very glad I didn't listen to them - but then in my case I also have physical limitations that my sis was concerned about me being physically able to handle Shiloh B.
Shiloh B. and I now visit nursing homes, a local hospice and also go to our city library. My other Beagle is Shasta B. who will be 3 next month. I am hoping that she too will be visiting. My sis is now saying that Shiloh B. has really become a great dog and if anyone had asked her when he was 8 months old, if he'd be doing what he is now - she would have laughed in their face.

So yes, most definitely an older Beagle would make a great first dog - I would recommend one over the age of 2 and a half simply because as a rule, most Beagles do not mentally mature until 2 - in the case of Shasta B. - it's taking a few months more - if ever.

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We just got our first dog together and while he's trained dogs (including a beagle before) I hadn't and I'm the one home most of the time, so the one to interact with the dog the most. I too would not suggest a beagle as a first dog. Corey's one and half and we're still having problems that in most dogs you can correct in the first six-eight months. Don't get me wrong I love him to death but every advancement we make is a battle.
 

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Maggie was my first dog. I got her at 8 weeks. It was a lot of work and a lot of learning for me. There were times I thought it was a mistake but I stuck with it. At 3 years she is a great dog and much loved at our house. I think a beagle can be fine for a first dog if you understand the committment and work involved. I would also recommend obedience classes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I should have been a bit more specific lol. I'm actually the proud owner of a blind husky and have joined various breed forums as part of research as I'm doing a course in dog training I need to research as many breeds as possible.

Thank you all so much for your answers

stacy
 

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I agree with Kim. Yes, I would recommend an older beagle as a first dog...not a puppy. If you choose one from a rescue the foster family can usually tell you if they are housebroken, crate trained, still chew, bay, bark, cat tolerant, get along with other dogs, kid tested, etc. It is kinda like a dating site--you can match the personality of the dog with your wants. If somebody has previous dog experience, then they would probably be better able to handle a beagle puppy. Beagles are very smart, friendly dogs that typically love to be around people. However, they follow their nose which can get them into trouble. Also, they can be stubborn. Snoopy is now five and although she is trained, if she isn't into your command she turns her head and ignores you. Typically they love their food, too. Unfortunately, unless controlled by the owner, that often leads to overweight dogs.
 

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Beagles make great companions for the active individual or family. They are extremely friendly, playful, curious and full of energy. They are a devoted breed that is highly sociable and loving.

The Beagle is by nature a natural hunter, and is independent. He has a keen sense of smell and enjoys tracking. They are brave and quite intelligent. Beagles are happy outdoors and require plenty of exercise to release their pent up energy.

Beagles are a very happy go lucky breed that is sociable, loyal, courageous and smart. They are happy with both active individuals or with families. They love children, and are eager to play and are great company.

Beagles have a sweet expression and are a nice medium sized dog. This makes them ideal for both the city and country. They are easy to take care of, as their coat requires little grooming. In fact, Beagles do a good job taking care of themselves. Keep in mind their coat does shed.

Even though Beagles are very friendly and excellent family dogs, there are certain aspects about this breed that some owners don’t find so charming, and why many Beagles are given up to rescues.

For instance, Beagles love to howl, and have a loud baying cry that can seriously get on your nerves as well as your neighbors’. Beagles tend to howl a lot when they are left by themselves. Thus, if you are really interested in this breed, but will be out frequently, you should consider getting a second one for company.

Furthermore, their natural tracking instinct takes over when they are outside. Therefore, they should not be let off the leash, as they could easily run off on a tracking quest if their scent picks up something that interests them.

Beagles are friendly with other dogs, but can not be trusted with other family pets such as cats and rodents. They must first grow up and be socialized with other non-canine family members before accepting them.

Finally, even though Beagles are an exceptionally smart breed, they are stubborn when it comes to training. Therefore, you will need plenty of patience and the time to take them to a proper obedience class.

Beagles are wonderful pets for those who understand what it means to be committed to this breed. If you have any doubt at all in regards to owning a Beagle, make it fair to yourself and the dog and don’t get one.

Cassidy is the love of my life!
 

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Originally Posted By: Brien & Bodie
Before buying a beagle make sure you become familiar with their baying/beagling trait. It can be a quirk you won't like to deal with.
oh believe me! ...Milo's bark sort of reminds me of my own voice when i began going through puberty *croak* *croak* makes me laugh
 

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My husband and I had both had dogs growing up but Shelby was a first beagle for both of us. We went with the breed on a whim (other than considering the size) but since she was with her mom for the first weeks, i read about the breed and studied about it. She has been a typical puppy as far as chewing and everything-nothing too different. I just love her! I know she'll be an awesome dog for us. I agree with needing patience though, that's a VERY important factor!
 

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Originally Posted By: SmeagleTotally depends on you, and your lifestyle, and if the Beagle breed is a good match for you.

I know first time owners who have gotten beagles and done very well with them and first time owners who have ended up putting the dog in the pound.
I'm going to agree with Smeagle. Not only is a Beagle my first dog EVER, I have two, which is highly recommended AGAINST doing.

It really all depends on the type of people. My boyfriend and I love having both puppies - they keep each other such good company, and they are so funny. They're only stubborn when they want to be, but that usually goes away when they see food. We use the NILIF training method, which seems to work wonderfully with them, as they are now very good at sitting and waiting patiently for their food and water, as opposed to jumping up excitedly.
 

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If you have done your research and understand what comes in the standard beagle package, then yes, a beagle makes a fine first dog!
I was raised with beagles and as an adult have raised and seen 2 go to the Rainbow Bridge. I have 2 beags now. One was a yr old rescue and one a 7 week old puppy. Breed traits are strong indicators of whether or not a beag will fit into your lifestyle.
 

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That stands for Nothing In Life Is Free.
Basically means that you do not give the dogs anything unless they earn it, and thats not just food related. I make my dog sit before I throw any ball, and sit before I let him out of his area to run free in my yard. It's these little things that count too.
 

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NILIF=nothing in life is free
It's a training method in which you essentially ignore all attempts by the dog to get your attention and give it only on your terms...play, petting, feeding...There's a post here somewhere about it. Maybe someone could link it?
 

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Rocky is our first beagle, not our first dog though, and Indy was as different from a beagle as night is from day! Fortunately I grew up around dogs, and my hubby also had dogs in his life. Now, that being said, there is nothing like a beagle!! You really need to understand the breed and their inherant qualities or you will be a very frustrated owner! For example, I would never dream of expecting Rocky to walk along quietly beside me...his nose is just too much for him to ignore! So, we do a large portion of his walks on a sniff-fest, and towards the end when he's getting more tired, then I step up the training portion. There are things I will do while he's sniffing just so he remembers I am the boss, like not allowing him to pull on his leash, and we stop and sit and wait at every street crossing. ANyone considering a beagle really needs to do their research...they are great dogs, and very clever, but they can also be a lot of work!

And btw, Rocky is worth every second of the work and I am so glad we decided to take him on!
 
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