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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I know this is a Beagle board, but I wondered if any of you with cats might have any ideas.

Sophia has a horrible drooling problem. I mean it's so bad that I have taken to putting down old blankets in the areas where she lays and I have to wash those every other day or so. The vet says she has an infection in the back of her mouth. She's been on 3 rounds of antibiotics plus oral steroids. The only thing that has stopped it is the steroids. The vet wants me to cut back the steroids to every other day, but when I did that the drooling came back. Anyone ever had experience with a cat like this? I haven't and the vet just wants to pull all her teeth, but I don't want to do that to her especially when they can't guarantee that will solve the problem.
 

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My cat had had a drooling problem many years ago. She had 3 teeth that were decayed and after they were pulled out the drooling stopped.

I can't see the point in pulling out all Sophia's teeth because it's got to be possible surely to locate which teeth it is that are causing the problem, if indeed it is her teeth!!

How old is she and how well is she coping with eating?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
That's encouraging to know that your cat only had 3 teeth with the problem.

She seems to be eating fine, but she does favor her left side to chew from what I can tell. I adopted her from a local shelter back last August and they estimated her to be about 2 at the time.
 

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I would get a second opinion. One of my cats had a problem like this and she had a small growth way back in her throat. I have also heard of cats getting a small piece of something caught in their throat or between their teeth and drooling. Is the vet able to get a good look with out putting her under? I would not let him pull all her teeth without a second opinion or a much better reason why he thinks that is the problem. Also has she been tested for FIV and FeLV?
 

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I never had that problem with a cat, but "Spot & Fritz" were the
only cats in my life. Snapper & Duke, our first beag rescues did
have that problem though! But they were very emaciated when we
adopted them! And the most "food oriented" beags we have ever
known! (Nibbler is a close contender)...but he & Rufus were
adopted before they turned one year old!!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Originally Posted By: jassyI would get a second opinion. One of my cats had a problem like this and she had a small growth way back in her throat. I have also heard of cats getting a small piece of something caught in their throat or between their teeth and drooling. Is the vet able to get a good look with out putting her under? I would not let him pull all her teeth without a second opinion or a much better reason why he thinks that is the problem. Also has she been tested for FIV and FeLV?
I've had 3 of the 4 vets at the clinic look at her, and so far only one of them has mentioned pulling teeth. I made an appt for Friday with one of the others to get their opinion. She was tested for FIV and FeLV at the shelter where I got her and they said she was negative for both. Hopefully, the different vet on Friday can shed some light on it.
 

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I asked my friend about this. She has fostered cats for our local rescue group for years and has a kennel license to keep up to 20 at a time so she has seen almost everything. She suggested that if the teeth and mouth have no disease that you consider whether kitty might be nauseated. Evidently nausea can cause excessive drooling in cats. I am really curious about this now. Be sure to post when you find out what is going on.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
We went back in today, and the vet said that Sophia does have some teeth that probably need to be pulled. This does not guarantee that the problem will be solved because her gum and cheek tissue is also inflamed. So, they sent me home with antibiotics and an oral steroid since the steroid stops the drooling. We'll do the steroid for a few more weeks to see if there's any improvement, if not we'll set up her appointment for the multiple teeth extractions. If pulling the teeth doesn't help they'll test her for Bartonella, which apparently is a very expensive test according to the vet so she doesn't want to do it unless nothing else has worked.

So, that's all we know right now. She seems very happy otherwise. Nothing makes her more happy than stealing the dog's food /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/tired.gif
 

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I'm glad that you have some sort of resolution to this. They won't pull the teeth out while the gum is infected because that could spread the infection. Once her gums have healed up and the teeth removed if need be lets hope she's OK.
 

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I am glad to hear that you at least have a starting point. Did they rule out stomatitis? If her teeth are bad it could be stomatitis caused from sensitivity to the plaque. If it is Bartonella it can be contagious to humans. Did your vet discuss that with you at all? At least she doesn't seem to feel uncomfortable. I don't think Maggie would know what to do if a cat tried to steal her food. Its usually the other way around here.
 

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I hope that Sophia's problem improves, and that the antibiotics and extractions will put her back in top form. Having experience with Miss Priss, I think that cat health issues are sometimes more difficult to get a handle on than dogs' issues. /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/cool.gif
 
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