Our Beagle World Forums banner
1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok she is 5 months now, she has slept with me on the bed and of course she has had her accidents, but the last 5 times she was fine, I bought her a new bed and she soaked it!, she is fine on my bed but not in her bed, even in her cage she still pees in it, the last time she did it in front of me she was laying down and peed it was weird, I have taken her pee to the vet, she said no UTI, is this norm, she never poops in her cage, thoughts anyone?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
147 Posts
Our pup would pee in his crate - frequently, until he was about 8 months old. Sorry if that frightens you! He was no longer having accidents around the house but his crate was another story.

Don't leave anything soft in there - no bed, blanket or towels. Seems harsh, but our guy would pee on his blanket, then roll it up so he wasn't lying in it.

Is she peeing during the night? We would take his water away by 8 at night.

How is the rest of her housetraining going?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
No poop in the cage or in the house, well sometimes in the house, my roomate is horrible with dogs, I have no other choice and can't afford a walker, but he complains about them pooping in the house, but she never does that when I am home. My dog is picking my roomates puppies habbits, he craps all over the house lol, it sucks! But she doesn't normally, but they have been telling she has been doing real goo lately no poop in th house she still pees sometimes, but they play all day! Untill I get home then its daddy's time
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,163 Posts
Dogs' bladder control is still in the formative stages when the dog is 5 months old. It usually takes until they're at least 6 months old for them to get muscle control of their elimination system. Your dog is not acting out or being naughty when she pees where she isn't supposed to; she is physically incapable of holding it 100% of the time at her age. But you should see improvement very soon, and that will make things better for you all.

In the meantime, keep up with the positive reinforcement of going outside, consistent potty breaks, and water control; don't scold her for inside accidents (as that will associate peeing with shame, and she might start trying to hide it from you, which will extend housebreaking); and have faith that this will pass.

Having your roommate be more supportive and active in the housebreaking process will be better for you all. Does he not take the dog outside when it needs to go out? The more he cooperates, the more likely it is that the dog will stop pooping in the house sooner rather than later.

I've been in a situation where my roommate (who usually worked from 3pm to midnight while I worked from 8am to 5pm) suddenly brought home a dog that I had to help take care of, so I understand the annoyance and resentment that can grow from having to clean up accident after accident. However, I helped with the dog's housebreaking (not to mention fed him, took him for walks, and brought him to my grandma's to play with her dogs), and the dog's housebreaking happened pretty quickly.

As long as you make sure that you take on the majority of your puppy's training and care, your roommate hopefully won't grow resentful of having to take care of your dog. If you haven't already, please talk to him about how he feels about having the dog around, the dog's training, and punishment. You don't want your roommate reinforcing bad habits, making the puppy afraid of him (yelling for no reason, stomping around while the dog is cowering, etc.), or abusing him because of any resentment against you. I do not want to assume anything about how your roommate feels about the situation - maybe he is totally in love with the dog and happy to help - and maybe you've talked all this out already, but if you haven't brought it up, I hope it's something new for you to think about and something to discuss with your roommate to make sure there is peace in your house and that your puppy gets a happy, healthy start to life.
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top