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I received Maggie's AKC papers in the mail today, and if I'm reading the family tree right, her mother and father have the same father. Meaning her maternal and paternal grandfather's are one in the same. Which would make her mother and father half brother and sister, right?

As the line continues, I also see that her maternal and paternal grandparent's also came from the same mother and father.

Is this normal breeding practice? I'm worried about genetic defects (hip dysplasia, etc.) that may not become apparent until she's older.

If this is not normal breeding practice, who should I contact to prevent this from continuing?
 

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It doesn't sound right to me, but I am not an expert.
I would contact the AKC to check with them about breeding approvals for that pedigree.

So far Lil' Maggie is okay, right?
 

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I'd check, too. Most good breeders work hard to keep their lines genetically diverse.
 

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I'm NOT an expert - but I am a hobby breeder - and I'd never do line breeding. You have to really know what you're doing to "line breed". Many years ago it was a really common practice - when I was a little girl (60 years ago), my first dog was a Boston Terrier - his breeder used him as "stud" for both his mother and his daughter. It's not done nearly as much now - but my vet tells me that a few breeders STILL do it. Often it's done to "continue" or "strengthen" some desirable "trait" - but as far as I'm concerned, it's just too dangerous and can really continue or strengthen BAD traits just as easily. I'd check with AKC - and your vet - and I'd avoid that breeder in the future if looking for another beagle puppy. That is just MY opinion - as I said, I'm NOT a genetic expert - but it's what I'd do. By the way, I furnish buyers of my puppies with a 5 generation research pedigree of both parents BEFORE they get one of my pups.
 

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10. I've heard that you should not buy a dog that is inbred. What does that mean?



This is not true. Dogs are bred in three ways: Inbred...which generally refers to the very closest breedings of mother/son, father/daughter, sister/brother... Linebred - which is a less severe form of Inbreeding, such as half sister/half brother, granddaughter/grandfather etc., or by Outcrossing...which is having no related animals within three generations. There is NO single right way or wrong way to breed dogs, and all three types of breedings can potentially produce acceptable quality puppies. When a breeder inbreeds, it simply means they are attempting to intensify traits within a family line for breeding/competition purposes - to make an animal dominant in the hard to get areas of quality. Inbreeding/linebreeding do not create shy or sickly animals any more than outcrossing, and an outcross dog does not have more vigor than a linebred animal. Inbreeding or linebreeding merely increase the chances that certain traits will be intensified, whether those traits are desirable or undesirable. Most breeders will selectively utilize all three breeding practices in their breeding programs at some time, and line breeding is the most common practice.



This is an interesting copy and paste that I just got off of the AKC's National Beagle club site LINK Its #10 in the FAQ section.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks Joshua! I did find out that Maggie's type of linebreeding is not a problem, as the bloodline is AKC/DNA certified to be clear of genetic disease. All of the males in the bloodline are champions, so I'm sure there's some sort of trait there that the breeder is trying to repeat.

Thank you for including the link! Obviously I'm VERY relieved. Thanks to Chloe's Mommy also, for checking into this for me!
 

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Contrary to popular belief, inbreeding does NOT cause genetic defects. The problems would already be in the line, as recessives, however the close breeding will reveal them as Dominant traits. There are some lines that have not been carefully bred and are inbred to the point of what is known as an inbreeding depression. It takes a fair amount of aggressive inbreeding and absolutely no blood coming in for that to occur. It's basically the extreme scenario & does not automatically occur simply because close relatives have been bred together.

Many lines are not only safe to inbreed, but doing so will actually ensure that a healthy sire or dam who is producing this trait will continue to produce it in the offspring. Yes, inbreeding when done with forethought with the right complementary bloodlines WILL lock in the health of an already healthy line. Consider the following. You can have a healthy bitch who produces healthy pups, and breeder her with a male that's a total outcross, meaning no common ancestors in the 3-4 generation pedigree. You now have only half the genes from the sire, half from the dam in those pups. Breed the pup from that pair in another outcross, and the great producing bitch your pup is out of is now only contributing to 25% of the genetic makeup in the progeny of her own offspring. Now, third generation let's say we do another outcross, and that outstanding bitch you started with only comprises 15% of the genetics of that pup. So, what do you have now? A hodgepodge of genetics, which is not to be confused with genetic diversity. Diversity is a healthy combination of inbred/linebred animals with healthy amounts of outcrossing, but NOT a breeding program based on outcrossing.

That third generation pup may appear correctly built & be healthy herself, but since she contains a hodgepodge of genetic makeup, she will never reproduce her genotype in her pups. Her litters will be inconsistant, and there will be nothing contributory about her that you can peg down with her pups. There is nothing to build upon, becuase she will not consistantly reproduce her strengths. Outcrossed dogs tend to look better than they breed, and inbred dogs breed better than they look. I am waiting on a litter of pups in which we bred our best male back to his dam. The sire is from an outcrossed litter, so we have a fair amount of diversity to begin with, however the only reason he and his dam are producers is because she is linebred herself. She stamps her pups with health, conformation, hunt - we want to keep her qualities strongly within our lines for years to come, so the inbreeding is necessary.

BTW, DNA certification does nto mean the lines were clear of genetic disease, only that the sire is frequently used and must be certified so that we can establish his litters are actually out of him ... it's basically done to prevent pedigree fraud. Neither AKC nor any other registry will penalize breeders for inbreeding in any form. It's just not the abusive, monstrous thing some people make it out to be.

P.S. Sorry this got so long! If you'd like, I can take a look at his pedigree, as I may know some of the bloodlines & can give you any info I know about it ...
 
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