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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all..
My membership is just approved and I believe that I'm gonna learn a lot here.
I don't have a beagle (yet) and I don't think to get one before get answers for my questions.It would be the best not to make her unhappy if she isn't appropriate for my life.
Anyway..I'm listing my questions.

1)I live in a single house,3 stories.Have a large fenced yard.Got an A/C at living room and bedrooms.Every room is free for dogs but the kitchen.I think that's enough for describing the house that I live.I can give further information if necessary.
Is that home and yard suitable?

2)I have 3 dogs at present,3 large breeds.They are very social and they won't be a problem if I get a beagle.But how about beagle?As I've read it's good to have another dog(s) at home with beagle since they don't like to be alone.
My dogs won't be a problem for beagle,will they?

3)Do they dig a lot?Digging at the dogs' garden (they have their own garden when we are not at outside with them) won't be a problem but I would prefer the main garden is not dug

Can I stop her at the main garden?

That's it i guess.At least I don't have more questions right now.

Thanks for answers
 

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Welcome!!!

I think it's very wise to research the breed before getting a Beagle! They are dogs, but most of us believe that they are partly human


I live in an apartment, and Chloe is just fine. A house with a yard (fenced!!!) is great.
Other dogs as companions are super great!! Beagles are very sociable and love company of other humans and dogs.
As for the digging... I don't know. I guess some dig and some don't. I'm guessing that if your Beagle is not unsupervised in the main garden, there is no need for worrying.

I understand that you are thinking of a female?
 

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Your home certainly sounds suitable for a beagle. I have three dogs other than my beagle, and all co-exist with no problems. As for the digging, I can't answer that one. We don't have a digging garden for the dogs, so they do dig in our yard. Don't know what they'd do if they had their own digging area.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for welcoming

I believe that dogs are partly human too.And they become our family members so they deserve the best since we don't ask them if they want to live with us!

Let me explain the yard.It's big and all fenced.There is a part that belongs to dogs.There are no plants can harm them.When we are at outside with them the whole yard is free.

Yes I think of a female.

What is your opinion?Under these circumstances am I able to make a beagle happy?
 

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Originally Posted By: Sandyj
Your home certainly sounds suitable for a beagle. I have three dogs other than my beagle, and all co-exist with no problems. As for the digging, I can't answer that one. We don't have a digging garden for the dogs, so they do dig in our yard. Don't know what they'd do if they had their own digging area.
If they are diggers, a digging garden makes no difference. They still dig everywhere. It is true that some dig and some don't however. Out of my 4 dogs, 2 are diggers, 2 are not.
 

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sounds like you will be a good Beagle parent.my Beagles dig. going through the yard you have to watch for Beagleholes, you could break a leg lol.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks for answers

Digging isn't a problem as long as we can stop her to dig the main yard.I think the word no or don't might be useful
If I can't stop her,well,at least I can say I've tried real hard
 

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It sounds like you've got the right environment for a Beagle. And yes he's gonna dig. I put in a dog run that has a drainage ditch along one side of it. I filled it in will big rocks. So Bodie can dig his little heart out during the day. All I have to do is kick the rocks back in and no harm done.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I've been reading some articles about beagles and I found out that beagles howl aloud frequently.Or bark. Of couse every dog has an unique personality but is this howling and barking issue right?
My other 3 don't bark generally and they all know what be quiet means.If they bark and we command them to be quiet they stop.Does it help beagle to learn to be quiet?

And if they are barkers when they generally bark-and why?
 

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Welcome to BW. You are right - I have nine beagles and each has his/her own personality. Some are big barkers, others not so much. Usually when there is a or cat dog outside they bark, so they spend much of their time inside, since the neighbors on one side have at least half a dozen cats that are outside 24/7. Mine tend to sing if they can hear me outside and want to be with me. Diggers? There again, some are great diggers, some don't dig at all.

You are in for an experience if you decide to add a beagle puppy to your pack. Having had many dogs in my life - but never having a beagle until I was in my 60s - it was quite an education. I actually thought beagles were DOGS! What an idiot I was! Beagles are HOUNDS - and they don't always respond to training the way some other dogs do. Obviously I learned to love the breed - and can't imagine not having beagles in my life now.



Here's a link I found useful for prospective beagle owners.

http://members.tripod.com/luvbeags/id17.htm
 

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I have one howler out of 4 dogs, three of which are purebred Beagles. Again I believe it is an issue with teaching them their limits, being consistent in their training and acquiring them as pups. Jasmine, our howler, did not come to us until she was 3.5 years old. She had learned the habit of howling and performs the task well. We had acquired Tate at 5 weeks, Maya at 8 weeks and Sam at 8 weeks and none of them were ever allowed to think that howling was acceptable.

If a Beagle is raised as an outside dog without much human interaction I think they tend to be more of a howler. If they are supervised the majority of the day and have a lot of human interaction I think that they will howl less if at all. When my dogs start barking, I make them come inside and ground them temporarily by shutting the dog door. They know they are in trouble when that happens. Even with 4 dogs I have yet to receive a complaint from any of the neighbors about excessive barking.

Others can probably correct me if I am wrong, but it seems to start with the barking and when the Beagle starts getting too excited about the barking that is when the howling will begin. I just try to never let them get that excited about the barking.

Out of all the dogs I have owned, mutts, purebreds, large or small, Beagles are the most suitable animal for my household. I love them tremendously and can't imagine a house without one. lol
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Originally Posted By: beagletailsAgain I believe it is an issue with teaching them their limits, being consistent in their training and acquiring them as pups.
That's what I think but since I don't know the breed I'm not sure

So as I understand I might teach her not to bark/howl,at least stop the barking?
How about being alone?Not completely alone of course,being with other dogs when we are away.Do they bark when their people are away or other dogs make them busy enough not to miss people and bark?

And beagletails..How did you make them think howling is unacceptable?
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Originally Posted By: beaglesmomHere's a link I found useful for prospective beagle owners.

http://members.tripod.com/luvbeags/id17.htm
Yay!I've been reading that site and it's informative.

Based on the writings on this site I have 2 more questions.
1)Using a crate.The writer wrote that s/he uses crates for her/his beagles.I have a crate and it's big enough to easily keep a large breed dog in it.But as I've read beagles want to be with other dogs when their owner is not at home.So is a crate useless?
2)Daily exercise...How long does your exercise take?As I've read -again- it's not a good idea to unleash a beagle somewhere not fenced.So do you walk?What kind of exercise you do?And,as I said,how long does it take?
 

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A big welcome. What made you think of getting a beagle? A good choice but I just wondered.
Are you planning to get a puppy or adult? It sounds like you know a lot about dogs so a new addition shouldnt be too much of a challenge. A hound can be quite demanding though. One, you can never let a beagle off the lead outside a safe area. They follow their noses and no amount of training will hold them back if they get scent of a rabbit or something.Otherwise beagles are very loving and good fun.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Why beagle?Well,good question.I'll try to explain as much as I can.
I want a family dog,not a hunter.And beagle is good family dog as good as a hunter.Good with people,good with other dogs.
Their size is just nice.Neither too small nor too large.Of course there are another dogs suit that definition but beagle is good-looking dog and their character is better than other dogs.

I love beagles
I was thinking that beagle might be suitable for us and I came here to ask you the questions I had

I feel like I couldn't express myself..Physics isn't the main reason for beagle,character is much more important than physics.And I like the character of a beagle.
 

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You know, I have had people say to to me, WHY do you want a beagle - they're STUPID. That couldn't be farther from the truth - beagles are NOT stupid - but they are DIFFERENT - therefore different training mechanisms work for beagles. If you're looking for character - well, the beagle is the dog for you. I always say (and I think there are several people here who might agree with me) that God made beagle puppies so cute so they'd LIVE to be adults. When I adopted my first beagle (Princess, who was purchased for my then teenaged granddaughter), I had NEVER had a hound. Princess was quite an education for me. Every puppy I'd ever had before (and since I was over 60 at the time, there had been MANY puppies in my life), had been totally house trained by 3 months old. Princess and I had many serious discussions about the fact that our 3 story, 6,000 square foot home was NOT her indoor potty area. I can remember saying, I will NEVER have another beagle. But I have eaten those words many times. I didn't know about BW at the time (8 years ago), so I went in search of an active beagle forum to try to learn about the breed. Not finding an active group, another first time beagle owner and I met on an inactive group, and decided to start our own group - our group just turned 7 and, the last time I looked was the No. 1 beagle group on MSN - and No. 15 of over 1300 DOG groups, and both my friend and I have gone on to breed beagles from championship lines.
Since my home is not really designed for ease of housetraining - and my pups are all born right here in my family room where I spend the matjority of my time when I'm home, I turned the basement kitchen into a potty area for puppies - and even litter box trained one litter when they were about 6 weeks old. It was hilarous to see them all lined up by the litter box. They CAN be trained much earlier. They CAN also be stubborn - but will do just about anything for a treat.
Character - with my current dogs, there are 9 different dogs - 9 different personalities. The ones who have been here from the beginning were all the easiest to train. The adult rescues the most difficult - since they often come with issues - and sometimes were never properly socialized, as is the case with my two adult rescues. Both were kennel dogs - tho my Tanna was in training for field trials. Neither he or Lottie had ever been pets, and their manners left much to be desired. The puppies who are born here, know love and handling from the very beginning of their lives, and all have wonderful personalities - tho Angel, who was the only survivor of her litter is a little stinker - we thought we'd lose her too, she had to be bottle fed - and was spoiled rotten by my daughter, son in law and yours truly.
Here is something I give people who are interested in adopting one of my puppies. I don't want anyone to ever say that I didn't tell them the truth about beagles.


So you think you want a beagle?

Before deciding that you just “have to have” one of these adorable puppies, please consider that you are making a “life-time commitment” to this little canine friend.


Before making this commitment, please ask yourself a few questions.

1. The average life-span of a beagle is 12-15 years – assuming that all goes well and it doesn’t develop a serious illness or meet with an unfortunate accident. Are you willing to make a commitment to this little one?
2. Can you afford vet care? The minimum requirements are for yearly shots and exams, which alone can present you with “healthy bills” from the vet. My bills for the vet usually average $100. We won’t mention those “unforeseen” things, ear infections, accidents, etc., which can add up quickly.
3. Food is another BIG item. Your puppy has special needs. The pups in my home are weaned to Nutro Natural Choice Puppy Food. It is a very good quality dog food – which means it is not cheap. By the time you get your puppy (at roughly 8-10 weeks of age), he/she will still need to be fed 3-4 times a day. Your puppy will also need fresh clean water available at all times. You CAN buy cheaper puppy food, but in the long run, you and your dog will be better off with good quality food. You will need to feed less than of a cheaper brand, and because it’s more digestible, there is less “waste” – so less “clean up” with good quality food. I do NOT recommend canned foods, as they are not good for their teeth. Dry kibble is much better.
4. Are you willing to spend time training your puppy? All puppies need training – and beagles perhaps more than other breeds. While it’s EASY to fall in love with a beagle puppy, they CAN (and usually are) DIFFICULT dogs to “housetrain”. Hounds in many ways are unlike other dogs you may have had who were completely “potty trained” by the age of 3 months. You will find FEW beagles that are totally “housetrained” by 3 months, perhaps even 6 months. Are you willing to put the time into working with your puppy? If you’re NOT, then stop right now, because it is a time-consuming process.
5. MY first beagle was a total surprise and very difficult for me. I knew nothing about this wonderful breed – except that they were “cute” and “cuddly”. Beagles, like other hounds, are STUBBORN and more “independent” than many other breeds. They are led by their noses. This is why beagles are NEVER left off-leash unless they’re HUNTING (which is what they were bred to do). If you want a beagle as a pet, then PLEASE make sure you have a safe, secure fenced yard for him/her.
6. Do you have a place for a puppy where he/she will be safe while you’re away at work? Puppies – all puppies are destructive! You have to accept that and make your home as “puppy proof” (safe for them) as possible. Puppies LOVE shoes – and telephone cords, and electrical cords, so these things need to be out of puppy’s reach – because if it’s “there, they will chew”. If you have a “safe” room where puppy can’t chew things – such as a kitchen or bath that can be closed off, that will work, but I’ve known (and loved) pups who have chewed walls, so I prefer using a “crate” or “kennel” when I’m away. I’m fortunate with my job, I live close enough that I can run home at noon and let pups out for some play/exercise time. Years ago I would have said that was “cruel” – and it would be if you leave them in it all the time. It is their “den” – or safe place for them if you can’t be supervising them every minute. Even my dogs that have the run of the house will often go into an empty crate/kennel for a nap. IF you get a puppy from me, it will be accustomed to a crate from an early age, which makes it MUCH easier for YOU as a new owner.
7. There are several words that beagles do NOT like, among them “come” if they’re hot on the trail of something good. “No” is also a naughty word for beagles. I don’t want to discourage you – but if you’re considering a beagle puppy, you should be aware that they can be and often are STUBBORN. I suggest a good “Puppy Kindergarten” to get him/her started right. The key to beagle training is consistency (and TREATS) – beagles will do ANYTHING for treats. More about that later!
8. IF you get a puppy from me, he/she will have been born into a loving home environment with lots of love and socializing. I am not a “big breeder” with dozens of dogs, my pups are born right here in my family room, where I spend most of MY waking hours when not at work. They get a lot of handling and a lot of love. This is very important to making a good dog! He/she will also come with a “puppy kit” to get you started. These puppies are from excellent field champion lines and the litter is AKC registered. You will be furnished with the paperwork to register YOUR puppy. I have registered the litter, but registering your pup is your responsibility. I suggest that you do so as soon as possible, if you have any intentions of using your dog for field trials (their paternal grandparents are both International Field Champs), or for other AKC events they will need the AKC registration.
9. Beagles are “pack” animals, and do much better if they have other dogs in their pack.
10. IF you decide on a beagle puppy, and something happens that you cannot keep him, then he is to be returned to me for re-homing. I do NOT want one of these puppies to ever wind up in a shelter or rescue. I know that circumstances can change and you may not be in a position to keep your puppy – in that case, call me, and I will take the pup back. These are very special puppies, from very special lines and deserve a special home.
11. I will ALWAYS be available to answer questions for you and to help in anyway that I can with your puppy.
 

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lemonade...you asked how I let my Beags know that howling isn't acceptable. #1 when they start barking, I make them come inside. They love to be outside so confining them to the house is punishment in their eyes. #2 we wrap our hands around their snouts and firmly say No Bark. They usually look at us as if to say I'm a dog..I'm supposed to bark!, but we are very consistent. We do the same method to teach our dogs not to lick or give kisses. When you see what the females do with their pups, you'll understand why we think kisses are GROSS! lol #3 if all else fails we have been known to use a remote trainer (collar) that we can beep them and/or shock them when they are doing something wrong. (digging, barking, getting into the trash, putting their feet on the edge of the counters etc..) It has a long range and so they don't realize it is us that are doing the discipline. They just know they don't like hearing the beep because it is followed by the shock if they don't stop the behavior. What's really funny is when one dog has the collar on and they all start barking..we beep it and they all shut up at once because they can't remember if they are the one with the collar on. lol That has happened many times.

Beagles ARE good looking dogs and you can find beagles that are more of pets than hunting animals. My female Maya does not come from recent hunting stock so her pups make better pets. On the other hand, Jasmine has a little more of the hunting background and so her pups may be better suited to someone looking for a hunting hound. For the most part Beagles out west (I'm in Utah) are not hunting dogs. We don't have rabbits here. It's hard to take them hunting when there isn't prey around. lol
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
beaglesmom and beagletails,I'm thankful for your answers.
It was pleasing to read the non-cute issues about beagles.I understand that you want to make me know the possible negativity about the breed.And thanks for this honesty.
You've mentioned the life-span.I think the conversation with mom is gonna make you relief.
Mom,she says the average life-span of a beagle is 12-15 years.
Oh I wish to have 15 years with her!

Vet care and food are affordable since we already have large breed dogs.

Speaking of training,if I get a dog I HAVE to put both time and energy into training.

As I've mentioned I have a crate and it's fairly enough for a beagle.

Donna thanks for telling your method
 
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