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Hello all,
I recently had my 9 month old beagle, Henry, neutered. He has always been a very active, impulsive pup (counter surfing, jumping at greetings, and heavily pulling on the leash). It’s only been a week since his surgery, but a lot of people told me neutering would help with these behaviors. As of now, there is no change, but I wanted to come and ask the experts on here what your experience has been like. Did neutering help your beagle “chill out” or is that just beagle nature? Thanks in advance!
 

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He is still a very young dog so neutering won't curb his puppiness. However, as he gets older it will deter his desire to roam to find a mate and cut back on aggression. Beagles in general are active, happy little dogs and don't really settle down until adulthood. My beagle Oliver is 12 and he is soooo calm and quiet but still loves to play and go for walks.
 

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Honestly, those are behaviours that training will help, teaching him what you expect and what behaviours you want (as much as what you don't want - sort of a 'don't do that, do this' thing.

Forgive me if I missed this, but do have training classes you can take him to?

I love that picture of you both.
 
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I have a female..my vet said neutering and spaying virtually makes no change in the behavior.. its all about training..and beagles dont usually calm down before 3 years..my dog is almost 10yrs old and she's still full of enrrgy and a puller...lol
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Dog Dog breed Carnivore Companion dog Comfort
 

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I don't think there's good evidence neutering does much with aggression, but I could be wrong.

I would say training to have strong obedience is more important and effective.
 

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This info is from Vetinfo.com:

  1. The top reason to spay or neuter is to avoid unwanted pregnancies and litters. While it seems that everyone loves puppies, not everyone is willing to take on the responsibility of an unplanned litter. Our shelters are already overcrowded and by spaying or neutering your dog you reduce the risk of yet another unwanted litter of puppies
  2. Your female dog will live a longer, healthier life. Dog spaying before her first heat reduces your female dog's chances of uterine infections and breast cancer. Breast cancer is fatal in about 50% of unspayed female dogs.
  3. Your female will never go into heat, avoiding having to clean up blood stains on your furniture and carpeting.
  4. Your male dog will also benefit from neutering. If neutering is completed before 6 months of age, you greatly reduce your dog's risk of testicular cancer and a variety of prostate problems.
  5. Neutering will lessen a male dog's urge to roam. While some breeds are known for their wandering nature, neutering will lessen that urge and prevent injury from car accidents or fights with other dogs.
  6. Neutering promotes better behavior in male dogs. An intact male dog still has the urge to mount and mark his territory. Once neutered, these desires are greatly reduced, if not eliminated.
  7. Dog spaying/neutering is cost effective. While spaying or neutering can be costly, it is not nearly as expensive as caring for an expectant female and the puppies that later arrive. Many cities and counties also have reduced licensing fees for dogs that are neutered.
  8. Neutering does not make your dog fat. Many people use the excuse that spaying or neutering their dog will make them fat. Too much food and not enough exercise is what makes your dog fat. So long as you monitor your dog's food intake and ensure proper exercise, they should maintain a healthy body weight.
  9. By spaying your female dog you avoid having the neighborhood stray male dogs hanging out around your home while your female is in heat.
 

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Agree the behaviors described are best controlled by proper training and setting boundarie. It’s up to us to teach our pups what is allowable behavior. They aren’t born knowing how to live in a human world, they are instinctively following their emotions.

I advise neutering, although I haven’t had males until our son moved back with us and his unneutered male Yorkie. At age 10, he developed testicular cancer and the procedure was quite difficult (anesthesia at his age) with a lot of complications post surgery.

My point is recovery is quicker when their young, spares developing testicular cancer. There is some research that indicates spay/neuter should’t be performed until their growth is fully complete as it can affect bones and a host of other problems so when to neuter - it’s a balance that should be discussed with your vet.
 

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The protection from testicular cancers is definitely one main reason for our decision to neuter our pup. He completes 6 months today.
 
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