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Sammi just turned 1 in December. Overall she has been doing pretty good, but lately she has started to urinate in the house again. She will ask to go out, or I can usually tell when its time, but sometimes she just goes with no warning. She generally does this in one of our bedrooms, but has also done it in the kitchen and family room.

The other thing that is driving me crazy is that she does not come. I have worked with her with treats, but if she doesn't want to come, she doesn't. I know Beagles are stubborn, but its hard to get her to do anything when she doesn't come. Yesterday she snuck out when I went to the door for the mailman. I thought that was the end of her because I know she doesn't come. She chased after the first car that went by, then ran down to the busy thru street in our neighborhood. I jumped in my van (which she hates) and ended up walking around different yards trying to get her to come. Someone passing by offered to help and the 2 of us were calling her and she paid no attention. She crossed the busy street and started after more cars. By this time I had a whole street of cars stopping so they didn't hit her. Finally she got a bit spooked out by all the cars, hair standing on end, and came running to me. I picked her up and ran to my van. That was terrifying. What can I do to teach her to come. I don't plan on her being outside free again (have to make sure the kids are extra careful too), but even inside, she just doesn't come.

Any help is appreciated.
 

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When you figure out the answer let me know. My almost 3 year old Beagle Maya still refuses to come when called (if she doesn't want to). She has done the exact same thing as yours did when she accidentally got out one day. We have a 5 lane road near our home and traffic in all directions stopped to avoid her. How embarrassing for one thing.

Sulli, our newest pack member, also will not come. With her you have to simply shut the door and ignore her though and she will come in on her own through the dog door.

Then there is Tate who will come if he hears you pouring food in his bowl so that trick works pretty well.

Sam (who is our only Beagle/Lab mix) comes without fail.
 

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When Josie has escaped, I just walk towards where she is running. I whistle and crouch down to her level. 9 times out of 10, she runs towards me and tries to get past (like it is a game). She never gets a panicked response from me. Charlie is easy. He takes an immediate left and starts sniffing the neighbors bushes. I follow and when he is done marking the bush scoop him up.
 

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I'm not sure what to tell you, with Rocky and Daisy I can get them to come to me with the come here motion of my index finger, but when it comes to being free all bets are off. When trying to train, stay calm and try to stay positive. I have no idea how Rocky and Daisy picked up the habit of coming when we want them to (most of the time
), we really didn't teach them to come on command except for when we trained them with a dog whistle and a treat. We would blow the dog whistle when we wanted them to come inside, it worked most of the time. Ours are very food driven and I have heard a few people say that cheerios work great for training. Good luck and keep us updated
 

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Beagles are notoriously bad at recall (coming when called). We have worked with Duke on this a lot. I read a book saying that only tell your dog to come when he will. If you tell him to come and he doesn't, you are reinforcing that behavior.

We work with Duke in the back yard (Vi is actually good at recall). We don't always give treats, it's usually a pat on teh head and good boy, good come. But make sure there is always a reward, but not necessarily always a treat. Also, do not tell them to come if they are in trouble and you are trying to get them to stop doing something. If you do that, you've made come a bad thing and they won't want to do it.

Duke is getting better, but still has a ways to go. When he has escaped, all bets are off. But, Dave has learned that if he sits down on the ground when Duke is out front, Duke will come to him every time.
 

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Treats was the answer with ours. They were 6 years old when we got them so no time for fancy tricks. Eevery tme they came to us they got a treat. Now when we call they are there in a flash. However, ours are never outsude the garden without being on the lead/leash. Beagles do tend to get distracted by smells of the wild. Try to be carefull about yours getting out.
 

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A good way to practice come is to put them on a very long lead/tie-out(10 to 15 ft), then put them on a sit/down stay and walk away. Then when you are a ways off, call them and when they come praise them up and down and give a treat. If they don't come, pull them over on the lead and when they get to you, praise them. Eventually they get it that when them come, good things happen. Stay is another issue altogether. I taught Tucker stay at treat time by making him sit/down and stay before he gets the treat. I can now place the treat on the floor about 5 feet from him and he will stay till I give him the OK. It took months of consistent training to get there, but you can do it.
 

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Treats are not enough if the dog sees other things like the mail man, scenting, other dogs etc as higher value than you.

If you think of it on a scale of 1 to 10, 10 being the most exciting high value thing EVER, where do you think your beagle sees you?

The training I do with Daisy involves making sure that she sees me as a 10 and teaching her that everything that is fun and exciting comes from me and not through other things. We are doing food based drive training with a behaviourist, and the results so far are excellent although it does take a lot of work - Daisy is learning that nothing is more rewarding than what I have to offer her.
 

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First of all, I am glad Sammi is safe. You must have been terrified. I have been working with Snoopy for almost 4 years now. She is typical beagle. If she wants to respond she does so on the first utter of the word come. If she chooses not to respond, well, she doesn't. Ha, ha. All I can say is that is a beagle. She does come to me inside the house. It is outside where the problems start. Too many distractions, scents, etc. She is now (finally) starting to understand that if she comes to me she gets A LOT of praise and an immediate treat. Food is the key to any training of a hound.
 

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Originally Posted By: BubblesFirst of all, I am glad Sammi is safe. You must have been terrified. I have been working with Snoopy for almost 4 years now. She is typical beagle. If she wants to respond she does so on the first utter of the word come. If she chooses not to respond, well, she doesn't. Ha, ha. All I can say is that is a beagle. She does come to me inside the house. It is outside where the problems start. Too many distractions, scents, etc. She is now (finally) starting to understand that if she comes to me she gets A LOT of praise and an immediate treat. Food is the key to any training of a hound.
Food is a great motivator, but often hounds are equally if not more motivated by 'prey' so training with toys can also be really useful!
 
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