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I know beagles are by nature stubborn dogs. My little Kody just won't listen to things I tell him to do. The only thing he really listens to is go eat he does that with no problem. but as far as walking on a leash, sitting, and NO. That he doesn't do to well. I am a very soft spoken person so im not sure on how to get him to listen. I can't leave him out the crate for to long because he's always getting into things and by him not listening to me i can't get much done because im always running after him.

He's also a very scary dog everything scares him. He runs from cats,dogs(even from across the street), falling leaves, basicly anything. how can I break him out of that?
 

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Don't discourage. Have you tried puppy class with him? the basic obedience stuff there is pretty good I hear. I personally haven't attended one with Chloe, but I have a dog that I previously worked with a trainer on his obedience, so I followed the same thing with Chloe.
Beagles are very, how shall I say it, independent spirited canines. They weigh their options, before they decided. They need to know what's in it for them, which is why they are usually very food motivated. Work with a lot of patience, and with a lot of tiny bits of high value treats (frankfuters, bits of cheese, beef), try to use soft ones, so that Kody won't need to chew and lose concentration. Keep the sessions short (5-10 minutes 2-3 times a day). I promise, he will learn very quickly.

Good Luck
 

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I believe, though there many who would disagree, that beagles are not stubborn. They were bred to be independant thinkers and if what they think they want to do, is not always (OK seldom) what you want them to do, remember that they are not herding dogd/ They were also bred to be pack oriented and you are now Kody's pack. Kody will want to please the pack so you can easily train with praise and treat rewards. A basic dog obedience class is advised but it is more for you tham Kody. Eleanor gave you some excellant advice.
 

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Yep, it takes time. We took Duke to puppy school and like Bob said, it was more for us than Duke, though he loved going to class. It taught us the proper ways to get his attention and teach him to respond to our commands. We worked with him every night and there were some things we thought he'd never get, but does it at the drop of a hat now.

There are some things we know we will never train out of him, he will always steal clothes, drag out throw rugs and chew them and eat anything he can get his paws on. But.....he no longer has accidents inside, he walks well on leash, we can tell him to leave it with meat right in front on him and he no longer tries to chew furniture. So we take our victories where we can.

The first 6 months we spent chasing Duke like we would a toddler, but now that he's almost 15 months, he has really settled down and is a good boy. Your Kody will get there too, with time, patience and love.
 

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Originally Posted By: bobI believe, though there many who would disagree, that beagles are not stubborn. They were bred to be independant thinkers and if what they think they want to do, is not always (OK seldom) what you want them to do, remember that they are not herding dogd/ They were also bred to be pack oriented and you are now Kody's pack. Kody will want to please the pack so you can easily train with praise and treat rewards. A basic dog obedience class is advised but it is more for you tham Kody. Eleanor gave you some excellant advice.
Independant thinker is a good way to put it. Focused on there own personal goals is another way I like to think of them. My theory on how this came to be a trait of the breed is this: as hounds used for scent trailing dogs that persisted and stayed focused on the chosen game that they hunted were used for breeding where as dogs easily distracted or who became bored with the chase were not. Which is why when Kody has chosen a job for himself its may seem difficult to snap him out of it. This of course is all conjecture on my part but it seems to make sense to me at least but as Bob pointed out they are also pack orientated which is a powerful tool for you to use in getting him trained. Keep at it and you'll prevail.
 

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If he is a fearful dog as you describe positive reinforcement training is your best bet. I had to do this with my beagle. I would find a basic obedience class in your area that teaches clicker training. It's a wonderful tool that makes training fun for both you and the dog!

It can be done!
 

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Keep in mind that positive reinforcement training for a fearful dog does not necessarily mean petting or showing massive amounts of affection WHEN Kody is showing signs of being scared. This may actually reinforce his hyper-cautious tendencies as he may associate your signs of affection with his fears. it may take a lot of patience and hard work to help Kody overcome his fears while trying to ignore our own instinct of consoling/comforting him. I'm sure it's well worth it and I'm sure it's possible. Good luck!
 

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Originally Posted By: Java the BeagleKeep in mind that positive reinforcement training for a fearful dog does not necessarily mean petting or showing massive amounts of affection WHEN Kody is showing signs of being scared. This may actually reinforce his hyper-cautious tendencies as he may associate your signs of affection with his fears. it may take a lot of patience and hard work to help Kody overcome his fears while trying to ignore our own instinct of consoling/comforting him. I'm sure it's well worth it and I'm sure it's possible. Good luck!
Of course you are correct in that.

I was speaking more along the lines of getting the dog involved in a sport perhaps or just taking obedience classess that teach clicker training. It builds GREAT confidence for a fearful dog.

Positive reinforcement training recommends ignoring unwanted behaviors versus the comforting that you describe.
 
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