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I would like to ask anyone if they have had a Beagle that has had there kidneys start to fail? Cheyenne is 13 and we have had to take her to the hospital today for a 48hr.stay so they can keep an IV in her to try to flush her kidneys. I asked our Vet to be frank with us and she told us that she had a pet that with the right meds and diet was able to hang on for a year and a half. But it could also be only a couple of months.Does anyone have any experience with this and what should we be looking for?
 

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My beagles have put me through much, kidney failure hasn't been one of the issues (thank god).

My thoughts are with you and Cheyenne.
 

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dont know why i feel compelled to suggest this.
but i personally would look for a homeopathic treatment as well.
my wife is on homeopathic treatment for cancer and it is working.
now mind you she is a registered nurse practitioner, (very modern medicine) but that didnt give her much hope.
the homeo doc she sees puts her on a lot of drops for different things, one is the kidneys.
i would look on the web for as much info as possible.
the drops she takes come from a company called desert biological.
Good luck.
prayers and support.
C.
 

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Daisy's mystery illness has also given us all kinds of trouble, but no kidney issues.

I'm sorry! Our prayers are with you guys.
 

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I haven't experienced kidney failure with a dog but I have with cats and depending on the degree of kidney function there are things that can help with diet and meds. Another thing that helps cats is subcuteaneous fluids on a regular basis. I don't know why the same things wouldn't help with dogs.
 

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Our last dog (Cocker Spaniel) went through kidney failure. I will be very honest--IT WAS THE MOST DIFFICULT THING I HAVE EVER ENDURED. I took him to the vet because he wasn't himself--no energy, not his usual appetite. He was my walking buddy and every night we would walk at least 2+ miles through the park, the fields and around a large duck pond. He loved it but he even lost interest in doing that. Our vet diagnosed kidney failure via blood work. They admitted him and began giving fluids. It was up to me to convince him to eat. I went several times a day and fed him anything I could think of via syringe. There are special foods (must be low protein) for kidney patients. For a short time I would take that canned food, add water and medication and feed him with the syringe. I had to force feed because he had no interest in eating. I also tried baby food. When he was strong enough she sent him home with us. We continued to give him fluids every night (the vet taught us how) and I would hand feed him several times a day. Our house looked like a M*A*S*H unit. We did this for two weeks before taking him back for blood work to check his levels. I will never forget that day. Although we still struggled at feeding time, he seemed to be getting better. I was so hopeful. I got the call at work. His blood levels worsened. I was stunned. I couldn't understand it. We continued treating him with fluids and whatever foods I could get him to eat. In desparation, I tried Pop Tarts (he loved these and would drool and stand by the bread drawer when you mentioned them) and I also tried liver (not good for kidney treatment). He wouldn't eat either. It was at that point that I knew it was time to let him go. The nightly fluid routine was becoming very difficult on all of us--he always new what was coming and would try to hide. I knew he was suffering. During the treatment you will see signs of hope. There will be moments when you see a glimmer of how he/she used to be. Unfortunately for us, those moments were brief. On his last day we took one more walk. This walk was shorter than our usual but coming back home he couldn't make it. I had to carry him. That is my last memory of him.

Good luck to you. But be prepared. You may be able to extend your time together but there will be many difficult moments. You will know when it is time to say goodbye.
 

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I've started to write this many times...I'm just having difficulty putting my experience into words. I'll do my best.

I lost Amber (my Beagle/Cavalier mix) about 4 1/2 years ago to kidney failure. Like Bubbles & Snoopy, it was the most difficult thing I ever went through. Our stories are very similar. One Friday I noticed that she didn't have an appetite. This was unusual for her but not unheard of. She could sometimes be fussy. This lasted throughout the weekend. First thing Monday morning we were at the vets. They ran blood work and gave me the bad news. Amber was put on IV fluids and kept at the hospital. I would go and visit her several times a day to try and get her to eat. The only thing I could get her to eat was coldcuts. I was concerned because it wasn't a low protein food, but the vet said that it was better than her not eating at all. That lasted three days and then we brought her home. I was shown how to do the IV fluid treatments. We had a little hospital set up in our bathroom. She would eat the special food we had for her if we mixed it with some rice and a little (very little!) boiled chicken. This went on for about two weeks. We kept bringing her in for her blood work once a week to check her levels (if memory serves me right, BUN and Creatinine were the ones we were most concerned about). Some days were better than others and I was hopeful for a few days that she was going to make a recovery. One day she stopped eating again. I took her into the vet and he said there was no change in her blood levels, good or bad. He felt it was just a speed bump and encouraged us to continue treatment. After another week of struggling to get her to eat anything Mike and I starting thinking if we were doing the right thing anymore. Her quality of life was non-existent. People tell you that you'll know when it's time, and I never understood that until that time. Like Bubbles&Snoopy, the IV treatments were getting increasingly difficult on all of us. Amber hated them and I felt awful putting her through them, knowing how miserable she was. She couldn't even walk outside to go potty. Mike had to carry her out and hold her hips up so she could go. Her stool got tarry one day and very runny. That was the night we decided that it was time to say goodbye The next morning was a Wednesday. I woke up to the sound of her coughing. I went and layed on the floor with her. I told her that it was OK to go now and that she didn't have to keep fighting anymore. She had a seizure on the floor and I held her as she passed. I felt her heart stop beating under my hands. I still beleive that she waited until I was with her to go. I was on the phone (on hold) trying to get Mike at work when everything happened. It was the worst day of my life. This all happened over about four weeks. Had I known then what I know now, I never would have put her through it all.

All that being told...I have known people who caught the kidney failure early on and got another year (give or take) with their pet. Amber wasn't in good health to begin with. She had heart problems, arthritis, hip dysplasia and Cushings. I hope your experience is much better than mine was. My thoughts and prayers will definitely be with you.
 

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Wow, Jen. It is amazing how similar our experiences were. I am sorry that you also had to endure this. I wanted to add this picture this morning in my post but found myself crying by the end. This is Copper on his last night with us.
 

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My Maggie had liver failure over a long period of time and then, during the last month of her life, had kidney failure. Since it has only been a couple of months since I had to let her go, I really can't handle going into too many details but, as others have already said, it is a difficult thing to handle. Like Cheyenne, Maggie was 13. We were at the vet every other day for sub-q fluids, pain meds and any other supportive care that we could think of. The vet and I had had many, many quality of life discussions and he told me that a decision would need to be made when Maggie no longer responded to the supportive measures. Please treasure every day you have with Cheyenne and take lots of pictures -- my thoughts and prayers are with you!
 

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Originally Posted By: Bubbles & SnoopyWow, Jen. It is amazing how similar our experiences were. I am sorry that you also had to endure this. I wanted to add this picture this morning in my post but found myself crying by the end. This is Copper on his last night with us.
I know, I read Copper's story and teared up. It was so similar to what we went through with Amber. By the time I finished writing mine, I was not doing so well. But it was nice to get to share it. It's been a while since I've talked about it. I love that photo of Copper. Great picture.
 

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Sadly we lost our Merlin to kidney failure, we didn't even know he was sick, he lost his appetite that was the first sign a week later Merlin was resting in Rainbow Bridge.
Our vet told me that with kidney failure you may not know as the body compensates as it loses function , then compensates some more as it loses more function until it can't compensate anymore and it's like the body just falls down. With a dog like Merlin who wasn't active it may have been hard for us to realize he was losing kidney function.
As your vet has told you , you could have caught it a lot earlier than we did and Cheyenne could hopefully be treated and live longer than we had Merlin. Merlin was 10 .
Much love and hugs ((()))
 

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Judy has good advice. Treasure every day you have with Cheyenne. She will let you know when it's time to let her go--when her quality of life is no longer good. I hope you have the year and a half the vet said you might. My thoughts are with you.
 

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Our last dog (Cocker Spaniel) went through kidney failure. I will be very honest--IT WAS THE MOST DIFFICULT THING I HAVE EVER ENDURED. I took him to the vet because he wasn't himself--no energy, not his usual appetite. He was my walking buddy and every night we would walk at least 2+ miles through the park, the fields and around a large duck pond. He loved it but he even lost interest in doing that. Our vet diagnosed kidney failure via blood work. They admitted him and began giving fluids. It was up to me to convince him to eat. I went several times a day and fed him anything I could think of via syringe. There are special foods (must be low protein) for kidney patients. For a short time I would take that canned food, add water and medication and feed him with the syringe. I had to force feed because he had no interest in eating. I also tried baby food. When he was strong enough she sent him home with us. We continued to give him fluids every night (the vet taught us how) and I would hand feed him several times a day. Our house looked like a M*A*S*H unit. We did this for two weeks before taking him back for blood work to check his levels. I will never forget that day. Although we still struggled at feeding time, he seemed to be getting better. I was so hopeful. I got the call at work. His blood levels worsened. I was stunned. I couldn't understand it. We continued treating him with fluids and whatever foods I could get him to eat. In desparation, I tried Pop Tarts (he loved these and would drool and stand by the bread drawer when you mentioned them) and I also tried liver (not good for kidney treatment). He wouldn't eat either. It was at that point that I knew it was time to let him go. The nightly fluid routine was becoming very difficult on all of us--he always new what was coming and would try to hide. I knew he was suffering. During the treatment you will see signs of hope. There will be moments when you see a glimmer of how he/she used to be. Unfortunately for us, those moments were brief. On his last day we took one more walk. This walk was shorter than our usual but coming back home he couldn't make it. I had to carry him. That is my last memory of him.

Good luck to you. But be prepared. You may be able to extend your time together but there will be many difficult moments. You will know when it is time to say goodbye.
Thank you for sharing this information. We just learned our beagle who is 12 y.o. has kidney failure. Our vet said we can give him subcutaneous fluids, that we could never get him enough fluid orally. At first we thought he had eaten rat poison, since some of the symptoms are similar, but the blood work showed the kidney failure.
He would have to go in weekly for medicine injections and they would send me home with prescriptions for the meds and the bags of fluid (which I could get at a regular pharmacy). The other option is to hospitalize him. Either way we would have to insert a needle in him and give him the fluids for 15 minutes every day, for the rest of his life.
This was all so sudden too. We had just been on hikes in the woods for the past 3 days, he was so excited and happy.
One thing to note, he has been spending a lot of time attempting to what we thought was defecate, while all along it must have been urinating was the issue.
 

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Goodness sorry to hear about your dog's condition. Its not something that's going to get resolved. You'll have to make decisions about how long you're able to sustain the fluid treatments.
 

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We had to put him down yesterday after he had a grand mal seizure lasting at least 30 seconds. It was the hardest thing to see such a good boy go through.
 

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I'm so sorry for your loss. That's heartbreaking. RIP
 
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