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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
When Beaglina was a pup she used to jump up all a lot, and in response I folded my arms and turned my back on her and she grew out of it. And we all lived happily after after /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/sick.gif

Well, no, the problem is that she still jumps up at other people /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/animal18.gif So, apart from training the whole population of Italy to fold their arms and turn their backs on bad-mannered beagles - does anyone have any ideas on how I can train her???
 

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You have to tell your friends to do the same. For strangers, I take it Beaglina is on the lead? When she jumps up you have to give a short tug on her lead and say No. If strangers come to the house, can you get her to sit on command when the bell rings? If so get her as calm as possible before opening the door. I'm afraidd it all sounds easy but is a question of practise and training.
 

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I have also heard to put your knee up. Not wacking the heck out of them or anything, of course. Just raising the knee into their chest is a deterent (sp?). It worked on Toby, but I learned the "technique" from a trainer. I have also seen people kneeing the heck out of their dogs, it wasn't working and it just looked mean...

Good luck!
 

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You should never knee into their chests actually, their ribs are so small that it takes very little to break them. We all got lectured on that at a seminar I went to in January (not that I ever did it anyway). I use the Off command and I twist when they try to jump on me. Just like everything else, you have to be consistent and they should never get attention until their bums are on the floor.
 

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I warn everyone that comes over to ignore Henry when they first come in, otherwise happy, high-pitched greetings send him into a kissing/jumping frenzy. Besides, it's more polite for people to let dogs sniff them while they ignore the dog, rather than freaking out and grabbing or petting. It's amazing how much calmer he is when people don't turn him into the center of attention. I also use a sit-stay a lot.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
thanks! but it really looks like it's easier to find ways of training people than the dog!

I'll try using the lead to remind her, my worry was that as she's wears a harness it might actually encourage/help her to jump up?? I'll definitely try working on sit/stay so that I can use that more too.

I am pretty consistent and she has to sit for her dinner, to have her harness put on etc. it's just that as far as she's concerned the rules only seem to apply to me

Henry's Mom - I can totally relate to the jumping/kissing frenzy! But sometimes she does it really quietly, like, you're not looking so I'm just going to very carefully stand and lean so your hand is right on my head... sneaky beastie
 

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We're having the same problem here in that Daisy thinks that the rules only apply if I am the one telling her to do something. She doesn't listen to my husband and he's just not feeling well enough to train with her.

Yesterday in Daisy's intermediate training class the trainer said to leave her leash on at all times, and when she starts jumping step on it. Don't do it so that it's tight, but just far enough down to where she has no choice but to sit to be comfortable, and it also keeps her from jumping up. I guess eventually, she'll come to realize there's no point in trying to jump because it won't work anyway.
 

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They're funny little boogers! Henry thinks that if he crawls into your lap oh so sweetly you won't notice!
 

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People who encourage my dogs to jump up them really annoy the heck out of me.

I always use the lead method. A quick tug on the lead then the command to sit.

If anyone, stranger or friend persists in encouraging bad behaviour from my dogs I just walk away...with the dogs of course lol
 

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Spencer's Mum, I can see how that could happen. I think people have a tendency to do it way too hard and actually hit the dog with their knee. With Toby, he just didn't want to jump up to my knee. I never really had to actually bump into him. He would just lose interest if I held my knee up - like he just wasn't getting to where he wanted! This was years ago when a trainer showed me, I guess the technique is old school now. Sorry to give bad advice!
 

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Donèt be sorry, that is what you were taught, a lot of people have been taught to do that. I have often blocked with my leg but never actually kneed towards the dog. In the book Marley & Me, they talk about doing it, and hard. Scares the crap out of me when I read that part.
 

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We went through this with Daisy.

Whenever she meets someone new, she must sit before she gets a pat from them. It then becomes obvious to her that she must sit to get attention, not jump up - if she jumps up I tell her "SIT!" and the other person cannot pat her until she is being 'polite' /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/eek.gif
 

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I do the same as Spencer's mum. I "knee" (well, not really) the pup in the chest. It just blocks Chloe and she immediately gets off. I don't usually let her jump on people, just by tagging the leash.
 

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Giving a gentle knee in the chest is fine if they jump up YOU but you can't instruct other people to do this to your dog. This is the problem that Beaglina mum is having.

As soon as she jumps up someone stop her from doing it straight away with the lead then make her sit to be petted. Tell whoever it is that you are in the process of training your dog to sit for strokes and hopefully they will oblige...but often they don't.

I find training people a lot harder than training dogs.
 

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I agree that people are harder to train than dogs.

Ours never learned not to jump up, probably because my husband and I realized that we enjoyed having them jump on us when we got home. So, as our mouths were saying no, our body language was saying yes, even as we turned our backs and told them to sit.

Instead, we send them to the back yard for some zoomies, and they are more settled when they come back in. As they've gotten older, the jumping has gotten less. And, they have figured out that there are more ear scritches from those that haven't been accosted at the door.
 

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I'm on the opposite end of the spectrum...I get jumped by dogs all the time /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/tired.gif I just push them down and don't think anything of it.
 
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