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Tobey is 1 tomorrow and most training things are going ok (or at least as well as I was expecting for a stubborn mischievous beagle) however he is really bad at jumping up on people who come to visit us and is forever trying to jump up on the kitchen worktops to steal stuff.

The kitchen bit I totally understand as he is trying to steal food/rubbish. But the people thing is very frustrating. I try to tell him to sit first and then get out visitors to give him attention but he still insists on jumping up on them. He's not so bad with us but has just been really bad with my mother in law when she came round this evening.

Any ideas what else I can try?

Thanks as always!


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The do calm down,Odie was really bad at jumping up at people,but all of a sudden he has stopped doing it. He is nearly 14months old. Just get visitors to ignore him until he is calm (extremely hard I know) we used to put Odie in the garden before visitors came knocking,this seemed to help a little and we also put his lead on him so he couldn't say hello until we let him!


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Ok, the rule we have here is 'NO LOOKING, NO TOUCHING, NO GREETING"

Everyone should completely ignore the dog, don't look at it, don't touch or pat it, no high pitched greetings...AT ALL!!

Even turn your back at the dog and carry on your human conversation and watch how the dog calms down. You might even want to put a sign on your front door with the above rule...it works. When the dog is calm then a low key greeting is appropriate but not until then.
 

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I agree with Cassie. I turn my back on the girls if they jump on me. My friend's dog is SO annoying with jumping and they are working on it but what I do when I enter the house is the no talk, no look, no touch - and turn my back on her if she tries.

In the meantime, or if you have visitors that are young children or elderly, you may want to put him on a leash and have him sit until everyone in the house is seated. I do that with Vazzle because she is very strong.

Down and Off are very good commands to work on to keep him off the counters, tables etc.
 

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HaHaHA! I'm laughing because I totally relate!

I have a husky who was an inch away from being completely feral when I got her. Huskies, apparently, are a little like cats: if it can be walked/sit/laid upon, so be it. I would come home to a 50 lbs dog lounging on my kitchen table or my island counter who didn't even bother to get up and much less look guilty. She'd lift her head sleepily and go "Sup?" I was lucky: I had a 13 yr old german shepherd at the time who took it upon herself to teach her the rules.

For those of us without the benefit of a canine enforcer, it's a question of consistency. Off the couch = (Clap hands loudly.) "Ah AH!" (Dog comes down) "GOOD GIRL!" (Give treat) IT takes a while but it works.

People jumping problems have different solutions. You can do them all for best results. Cassie's idea is great and perfect for new people. You can also teach them to "sit/stay" at a certain spot when you open the door. Have a friend come over and practice. Practice is key. Do 10 minutes twice a day.

And my "pièce de résistance": when the dog jumps on you, grab the front paws hold the dog in a standing position and ignore him. Look away. In a minute at the most, he'll start to whine and lick your hands. Wait another 3 seconds then let go. Praise when he's down and quiet. He'll learn "When I jump up, I have to stay up and it's not very comfortable and I'm not even getting any attention." Now if everyone does this, it'll take no time at all.
 

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HaHaHA! I'm laughing because I totally relate!

I have a husky who was an inch away from being completely feral when I got her. Huskies, apparently, are a little like cats: if it can be walked/sit/laid upon, so be it. I would come home to a 50 lbs dog lounging on my kitchen table or my island counter who didn't even bother to get up and much less look guilty. She'd lift her head sleepily and go "Sup?" I was lucky: I had a 13 yr old german shepherd at the time who took it upon herself to teach her the rules.

For those of us without the benefit of a canine enforcer, it's a question of consistency. Off the couch = (Clap hands loudly.) "Ah AH!" (Dog comes down) "GOOD GIRL!" (Give treat) IT takes a while but it works.

People jumping problems have different solutions. You can do them all for best results. Cassie's idea is great and perfect for new people. You can also teach them to "sit/stay" at a certain spot when you open the door. Have a friend come over and practice. Practice is key. Do 10 minutes twice a day.

And my "pièce de résistance": when the dog jumps on you, grab the front paws hold the dog in a standing position and ignore him. Look away. In a minute at the most, he'll start to whine and lick your hands. Wait another 3 seconds then let go. Praise when he's down and quiet. He'll learn "When I jump up, I have to stay up and it's not very comfortable and I'm not even getting any attention." Now if everyone does this, it'll take no time at all.
Hahaha..loved ur husky story! My beagle mix Bo is 6 months old and I walked into the family room twice now to find him just walking around the coffee table like it was no problem!!! I'm going to try the paw hold technique since he doesn't really care if I ignore him because he'll just chase the cat or torture the other dogs...urgh😩
 
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