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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My 10 year old daughter wants a beagle in the worst way. This is not a fad because she has felt this way for over a year. I haven't had a dog for a few years and I'm seriously thinking of getting a beagle. However I'm concerned about a fence. I have 1.5 acres and I want to let the dog be free instead of being chained. I've read that underground fences don't work with beagles. This will mainly be an indoor dog and not used for hunting. I like the smaller beagles. Thanks for any insight, Dwayne
 

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Dwayne!!

Well, a Bealge in my opinion cannot be let run unleashed! They are scent hounds and as such, will track scents and once they are on a scent trail, they tend to shut down their eye sight and their ears as good as non-existent!

I've heard that the electronic invisible fences work, but don't know for sure.

Training might help, but it will never guarantee that the dog won't ignore you (I would start training since puppyhood).

Other than that and the occasional howling (which I personally LOVE), they are the best dogs ever!!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks. What is the temperament of a beagle? My kids are 10 and 15. We also have 2 indoor cats. Are they hyper? Calm? Good with strangers? I was spoiled with a mut that lived to 19 that didn't have a mean bone in his body. He was never on a leash and had free roam all the time. From what I'm seeing on this forum, I won't be able to treat a beagle like I did my mut.

Dwayne
 

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Dwayne - I'm currently owned by ten beagles, ranging from 8 years down to 1 1/2 years - with everything in between. I'd never had a hound of any kind until I was over 60 - tho I'd had many dogs in my life. Here is something I have prepared for people who are interested in one of my beagle puppies - hopefully it will be helpful to you. I'll also include a link to a very good site about beagles. You'll find a lot of very good information here - and if I can be of any help to you, please don't hesitate to ask.
So you think you want a beagle?

Before deciding that you just “have to have” one of these adorable puppies, please consider that you are making a “life-time commitment” to this little canine friend.


Before making this commitment, please ask yourself a few questions.

1. The average life-span of a beagle is 12-15 years – assuming that all goes well and it doesn’t develop a serious illness or meet with an unfortunate accident. Are you willing to make a commitment to this little one?
2. Can you afford vet care? The minimum requirements are for yearly shots and exams, which alone can present you with “healthy bills” from the vet. My bills for the vet usually average $100. We won’t mention those “unforeseen” things, ear infections, accidents, etc., which can add up quickly.
3. Food is another BIG item. Your puppy has special needs. The pups in my home are weaned to Nutro Natural Choice Puppy Food. It is a very good quality dog food – which means it is not cheap. By the time you get your puppy (at roughly 8-10 weeks of age), he/she will still need to be fed 3-4 times a day. Your puppy will also need fresh clean water available at all times. You CAN buy cheaper puppy food, but in the long run, you and your dog will be better off with good quality food. You will need to feed less than of a cheaper brand, and because it’s more digestible, there is less “waste” – so less “clean up” with good quality food. I do NOT recommend canned foods, as they are not good for their teeth. Dry kibble is much better.
4. Are you willing to spend time training your puppy? All puppies need training – and beagles perhaps more than other breeds. While it’s EASY to fall in love with a beagle puppy, they CAN (and usually are) DIFFICULT dogs to “housetrain”. Hounds in many ways are unlike other dogs you may have had who were completely “potty trained” by the age of 3 months. You will find FEW beagles that are totally “housetrained” by 3 months, perhaps even 6 months. Are you willing to put the time into working with your puppy? If you’re NOT, then stop right now, because it is a time-consuming process.
5. MY first beagle was a total surprise and very difficult for me. I knew nothing about this wonderful breed – except that they were “cute” and “cuddly”. Beagles, like other hounds, are STUBBORN and more “independent” than many other breeds. They are led by their noses. This is why beagles are NEVER left off-leash unless they’re HUNTING (which is what they were bred to do). If you want a beagle as a pet, then PLEASE make sure you have a safe, secure fenced yard for him/her.
6. Do you have a place for a puppy where he/she will be safe while you’re away at work? Puppies – all puppies are destructive! You have to accept that and make your home as “puppy proof” (safe for them) as possible. Puppies LOVE shoes – and telephone cords, and electrical cords, so these things need to be out of puppy’s reach – because if it’s “there, they will chew”. If you have a “safe” room where puppy can’t chew things – such as a kitchen or bath that can be closed off, that will work, but I’ve known (and loved) pups who have chewed walls, so I prefer using a “crate” or “kennel” when I’m away. I’m fortunate with my job, I live close enough that I can run home at noon and let pups out for some play/exercise time. Years ago I would have said that was “cruel” – and it would be if you leave them in it all the time. It is their “den” – or safe place for them if you can’t be supervising them every minute. Even my dogs that have the run of the house will often go into an empty crate/kennel for a nap. IF you get a puppy from me, it will be accustomed to a crate from an early age, which makes it MUCH easier for YOU as a new owner.
7. There are several words that beagles do NOT like, among them “come” if they’re hot on the trail of something good. “No” is also a naughty word for beagles. I don’t want to discourage you – but if you’re considering a beagle puppy, you should be aware that they can be and often are STUBBORN. I suggest a good “Puppy Kindergarten” to get him/her started right. The key to beagle training is consistency (and TREATS) – beagles will do ANYTHING for treats. More about that later!
8. IF you get a puppy from me, he/she will have been born into a loving home environment with lots of love and socializing. I am not a “big breeder” with dozens of dogs, my pups are born right here in my family room, where I spend most of MY waking hours when not at work. They get a lot of handling and a lot of love. This is very important to making a good dog! He/she will also come with a “puppy kit” to get you started. These puppies are from excellent field champion lines and the litter is AKC registered. You will be furnished with the paperwork to register YOUR puppy. I have registered the litter, but registering your pup is your responsibility. I suggest that you do so as soon as possible, if you have any intentions of using your dog for field trials (their paternal grandparents are both International Field Champs), or for other AKC events they will need the AKC registration.
9. Beagles are “pack” animals, and do much better if they have other dogs in their pack.
10. IF you decide on a beagle puppy, and something happens that you cannot keep him, then he is to be returned to me for re-homing. I do NOT want one of these puppies to ever wind up in a shelter or rescue. I know that circumstances can change and you may not be in a position to keep your puppy – in that case, call me, and I will take the pup back. These are very special puppies, from very special lines and deserve a special home.
11. I will ALWAYS be available to answer questions for you and to help in anyway that I can with your puppy.

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The other link is: http://members.tripod.com/luvbeags/id17.htm
 

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Hi, in my personal opinon you couldnt choose a better choice of hound but a beagle is seriously a life changing commitment. These cute adorable little hounds couldnt be more trouble if they tried.

I hate to admit it but i jumped in head first without doing my research & boy have i payed the price!!! However i stuck with it & never gave up which ultimatley gave me the beautiful dog i have today.

I think the main points to take in are..........
Make sure your property is 100% BEAGLE proof which means basically make sure they cant tunnel, climb, jump over anything & sometimes i think they can fly!!!!
Dedicate all your time to training from the very beginning & lay down the law of the house & stick to it.
There is so much more to beagle ownership but get it right from the beginning & you will have some of the best years of your life.
 

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Originally Posted By: beaglepopperHi, in my personal opinon you couldnt choose a better choice of hound but a beagle is seriously a life changing commitment. These cute adorable little hounds couldnt be more trouble if they tried.

I hate to admit it but i jumped in head first without doing my research & boy have i payed the price!!! However i stuck with it & never gave up which ultimatley gave me the beautiful dog i have today.

I think the main points to take in are..........
Make sure your property is 100% BEAGLE proof which means basically make sure they cant tunnel, climb, jump over anything & sometimes i think they can fly!!!!
Dedicate all your time to training from the very beginning & lay down the law of the house & stick to it.
There is so much more to beagle ownership but get it right from the beginning & you will have some of the best years of your life.
I made the same mistake - I gave in to my granddaughter's desire for a beagle puppy without doing my homework. After pulling my hair out and having MANY serious conversations with Princess about her NOT having a 3 story, 6000 square foot indoor potty, I started researching the breed - and discovered that most beagles (or other hounds) are notoriously difficult to housetrain and are also notoriously stubborn! Once I accepted that, and stopped trying to make Princess into a Sheltie or a Keeshond (my last two dogs), and learned to accept her as she was - I fell in love with the breed. While trying to find other beagle owners I met a lady in NY who has become a lifelong friend - and the breeder of my special JoJo. She had her first beagle then, too - and we met while trying to learn more about these merry little hounds. Not being able to find an active beagle group, we decided to start our own - which eventually grew to become the No. 1 Beagle Group on MSN. Unfortunately, MSN is closing all groups - so we've found another home. In the 7 years since all this started, I've learned a LOT about beagles - and you're right, I do think they can FLY. I often call them my beagle/monkey/cats. I have several who love to perch on high places. One we nicknamed Wilt because of her long legs and her ability to leap tall counters with a single bound - in spite of being a whopping 20 lbs. soaking wet!
Sometimes I am overwhelmed by the pack - but I can't imagine NOT having a beagle or ten around to amuse me (or to frustrate me, as the case may be).
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If you can be the alpha dog in your pack and you can be consistent with training, then Beagles are great dogs. They just have to know who is the boss. I have read so many threads on this forum and others talking about how hard their beagles were to house train, but I have had numerous beagles over the years and have never had an issue with potty training. I will agree that they can be stubborn, but I let that slide I guess because I can't recall getting frustrated with my dogs for any reason other than our male being a chewer, but that can be in any breed.

My only concern for you is that you do not have a fenced yard. My beagles have never been able to be free of a leash when not fenced in because they WILL run and I worry they will be hit by the many cars near us. I think you would need to put up a fence around a small area at least or put in a stake and cable the dog to it when outside.

As for the temperament of the Beagle...well that depends on the dogs. I have had hyper Beagles here, but my 2 purebreds that we have at the moment are both mellow and lazy for the most part. They are only 1 and 2 years of age also so still pups really. Get to know the litter of pups and watch for signs of dominant and submissive behavior. (I personally think that submissive dogs are easier to deal with.)
 

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Donna is right about the fence - I won't let anyone have one of my pups unless they have a SECURELY fenced yard. Beagles are scent hounds - and I've known of very few who had a really good recall. If they're on a scent, then nothing else exists. My last dog before I got beagles was a Keeshond - if I said Come Sasha, she would stop in midair and come to me. Donna is also right about the temperments - I have ten beagles - ten different personalities and temperments - tho they are all sweet and loving. I've never had a mean beagle - tho my Romeo went through an aggressive stage before he was neutered. He's the most mellow dog ever now. Tanna is a little more hyper he is an intact male, and had been in field trials before he came here and had never been a pet. Lottie was a kennel dog belonging to a large kennel, and she is extremely shy and submissive - she's so much better than she was when she came here, but she still cowers at loud noises or sudden movements. Those are the only two of my pack who were adopted as adults. The others I either got as puppies, or were born here.
 

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Would you consider adopting a rescue? My Li'l Girl was at least a year old when we adopted her, and we didn't have any of the problems I read about puppies presenting. I did have to housebreak her, but with the help of a crate, that didn't take long.

Of course, I realize that all dogs have different personalities, and Li'l Girl may be an anomaly, but I do think an adult rescue might be easier. They have some baggage, but once they're secure, they're wonderful companions.

That said, I agree with the others that a fenced yard is a must. Our beagles need a secure area to run.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I've seen where beagles can be rescued that have been used for research. Does anyone know what kind of research has been done to them? Just today we did find a 6 month old beagle mix at a rescue on the web about 1 hour from my house. We emailed them our info that we were interested but have questions. She is already crate trained and spayed. She looks just like a beagle to me so I want to know what she is mixed with and why someone would give her up. Thanks for all of the information. I feel that if we do get a beagle we will just make sure that it is on a leash at all times. A fence of any kind will be costly and it's winter and cold right now in PA so the ground is kinda hard to dig.
 

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Dwayne,
A variety of medical researches are done to beagles due to their great temperament. From a wiki search, very general description of the procedures include: fundamental biological research, applied human medicine, applied veterinary medicine, and protection of man, animals or the environment.
You may be able to get more information as to the type of research that was done on a particular. I know some rescues will try to adopt out beagles that have not had significant intrusive procedures.
I've done a little research on this myself, and because scientists prefer a pretty dependable baseline, beagles used in medical research often come from pretty good genetic lines. The poor beagles just have not had the loving start in life as your beagles born to [most] breeders. To be fair to the rescues, they can only divulge what the labs or facilities tell them (anything more would be opinion and guesswork). There are a few parents here that have former research beagles, and I'm sure they can shed more light on this.

I also strongly recommend at least a fenced AREA.
 

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I would say a fence is definatly a must have in beagle ownership. There can be no gaps at all & no weak spots because a beagle will find them. It took me 3 different fences to eventually find the one that could hold my beagle, i even had to remove a tree when i discovered she could climb it for an escape route. I would say if you cant afford a fence or the weather conditions are too cold then its best not to get one yet. After my experiences i think you should be 100% prepared as much as you can be before buying a beagle & then tackal any arrising problems as you go along.
 
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