Our Beagle World Forums banner

1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi everyone..i have a 4 yr old beagle called buddy and is he like the son i never had.He as always been an anxious dog and up until a few months ago i cud handle that by reassuring him or avoiding situations i knew he cudnt cope with.
About 12 mths ago a friend visited my house and her 3 yr old son and when i had turned my back the boy had pinned buddy to the floor and buddy totally freaked out and bit him on his hand.I was totally mortified but felt responsible cos i had turned around.My children ave always been taught to treat animals with respect and i ave never had an issue.
A year ago my granddaughter was born and she lives with us,when she started crawling she crawled upto the safety gate that separates her from Buddy.He growled and snapped and thank god the gate was there.He now continues to do this whenever shes near him and i live in a constant state of alert.He also went to bite my husband the other day and then me the next day.
I am so scared that i wont b there one day if he should turn and snap.
Hes had all health checks and hes fine.I really dont know what to do.
Thank you for reading x
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,174 Posts
I'm not sure what stage of lockdown the UK is in at the moment, but I'd suggest getting a reputable trainer (edit - not breeder) (ask around) and having them come into the house to work with you.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
5,183 Posts
Some dogs can just be snarky and you definitely don't want him biting. Be sure he has his rabies shot up to date too just in case he does. I would contact a trainer. In the meantime, use gates where you can and even a muzzle if necessary. My beagle Oliver has bitten me a few times, he is very food oriented and also is super attached to my husband. If I get in between them when food is being prepare I can get bitten. This article might be helpful Aggression
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
25 Posts
You have some dominant dog issues and are gonna have to takes steps to re-establish the order in the household. It is probably imperative that you seek professional help. Your problem is definitely fixable, but you may need for the professional to take the dog out of the home and allow them to work on the issue away from you (the owners). Do as much reading on the issue as you can to educate yourself and follow the directions of the professional.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
I have amazon prime and have been watching a series called "It's Me or the Dog" (2010). It's so interesting how this trainer teaches both the dog owners and the dogs how to change behaviors. I think if you watch the episodes you'll find there are several in the first season (I just finished that one) you will find the solution to the problem and enjoy watching how the trainer works with other issues.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,008 Posts
He is scared - and his certainty that you, as pack leader, will protect him is shaken. Trust is a fragile thing. We got Sophie because I am sort of a 'last resort' person - it was me or she was headed to being 'put down' (the very experienced foster mom was not going to let that happen if she had any say, but literally had never seen/touched Sophie during the two weeks she had her except on her cameras). No one could touch Sophie without being bitten - she had been very badly abused before she was removed and sent to foster care. If you are unable to get professional help, you may want to work at re-establishing yourself as the calm assertive pack leader. When you are not with your granddaughter, try putting Buddy on a leash (use a harness, not a collar) and attaching the other end to yourself - belt loop or around your waist. Buddy should be able to get about 6 feet from you, but no more. Speak to him in a positive, upbeat voice. Praise frequently (when you 'catch him being good) - think toddler. He should only be fed directly from your or your husband's hand. Small children are scary for dogs. Does Buddy have a crate as a den - a place that is quiet and dark (I drape it with a blanket) that no one else is allowed in (and he is not locked it - it should not become a 'punishment')? You want to structure his environment as a calm, predictable place. If he was frightened by a small child, then he is going to be frightened of children until proven otherwise. Try to create a 'buffer zone' so that your granddaughter cannot approach the gate. Your goal is to make Buddy feel that home is calm, relatively quiet, predictable, and safe - and that you are in control. As scary and challenging as it is, I think the fact that you are looking for a solution is praiseworthy. Good luck - and please keep us posted!!!!
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top