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I am crate training Buckley, and use the crate whenever I leave, or whenever I have to devote all of my attention to something while I'm here and can't watch him.

I used to crate him at night, but recently have been letting him sleep with me. Is this bad? He seems to sleep for longer periods (sometimes all night) and I can't see any stains on the blanket on my bed, so I don't think he's been going during the night.

Advice appreciated.
 

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Basically there is nothing wrong with that, but I would try waiting for a few more months, at least until he is about 90% trained.
Some people say it induces separation anxiety, but I love sleeping with Chloe too and let her for the past week or so.... and she is very good during the night (I hope I'm not jinxing it now..... :p ).
 

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My Bailey been sleeping in the bed with us since he was 3 months old and was house trained at 4 months old and he is 2 yrs old now. He loves to cuddle up against us and we both Hard of hearing when he has to go outside in the middle of the night he come to me and breathe in my face and i wake up there he is waiting for me to get up to take him out until he quit last year he don't it anymore cause he'll sleep all night long.Nothing wrong with them in bed with you.
 

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We let the Twins sleep with us at about 5 months, about the same time we started leaving them outside all day while we were gone. We also lived through about 4 months of being woken up between 4-6am when they decided it was time to go out and hunt. Thankfully now they have realized that the smells will still be out there when we wake up.....and many times we have to actually push them off the bed to get them to wake up!


HOWEVER on the bad side, the last week since it has gotten cold outside, all 3 THREE pups have decided to sleep with us and neither me or hubby have made the entire night in the bed. We have trading spots on the couch cause it is almost impossible to move the Wonder Twins at 33 & 35lbs when they decide to sleep(they sleep VERY DEEPLY). Poor Stray Jack, weighing in at 15lbs just gets rolled off the bed :rotflmao: wheneither of us decide to roll over!
 

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Obviously I can totally relate to 3 in one bed. No room for hubby anymore. lol

Here is the theory: in the animal world the top dominant animal gets to eat first and leaves the left overs for the sub animals. The same goes to sleeping quarters. Top dominant animal gets the best bed.

If you let your dog sleep with you he may not have as much respect for you as the pack leader. Of course as long as they are not displaying Alpha type behaviors and they still listen to you...go for it. I love my little bed heaters and wouldn't change a thing.
 

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I go back and forth with it. afew nights with her int her in the bed, and afew nights with her in the crate.

that way when we go to someone else's house and we spend the night, she will go in the crate with no problems.
 

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I'd let my dog sleep with me (when I get it) but I sleep in a loft bed so that's out. /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/laugh.gif

My parents enever had any problems with letting their 60 lb German/Aussie shepherd cross, Pokey, sleep on their bed. They trained her that the foot of the bed was her 'place' and that when they patted it and said 'place', she'd flop down and curl uip there. That way they were still the pack leaders, while Pokey could be the pack heater. :lol2:
 

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Here's my take --
If the dog is in any way challenging your authority, no dog in the bed.

If the dog understands the pack leadership, enjoy the warmth!

In a previous incarnation of the dog-in-the-bed thread, I learned the true meaning of three dog night. While I have had many nights where I am appreciative of my two dogs sharing heat, I am glad that I've never needed a third dog to keep me warm.

Lucy and Flora both start the night in our bed, but Flora pours herself out when she gets hot, and sleeps on the dog bed by the radiator. In the morning when it's chilly, she'll whine, and I have to lift the cover for her to jump back in. I have learned to do this without really waking.

I'm not sure who trained who in our house.... :p
 

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Jersey sleeps in the bed with us and we've never had any issues. It helped us keep an eye on her at night when she was housebreaking as well. We never once had an overnight accident. She will sleep in her crate sometimes, but not too often. We've never had any dominance problems with Jersey, but sometimes that can happen if you let your dog sleep in the bed. If I tell Jersey to move, she moves. I must admit, I love having her in bed with me. She sleeps under the covers up against my legs. It's comforting having her with me.
 

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I love when Abby sleeps in the bed but my significant other does not...he doesn't like the thought of dog "germs and bugs" getting on the bed :eyes: It's been an ongoing issue between us since she came home. Like Jen I find it very comforting to have her there and Abby doesn't have any issues with crating when necessary.
 

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My husband and I agreed before we even got a pup that we would never let the dog sleep with us in our bed, for various reasons - possible accidents, dominance issues, etc. Sometimes I've wanted to but Boomer is SOOOO good about sleeping in his crate all night without accidents or waking us up - going somtimes 9 hours and I'M waking HIM up so we don't want to change a good thing. I think it makes it easier when we're away at work or on vacation. We do have "cuddle time in the big bed" on weekends sometimes and daily cuddle time on the couch so I think that helps.

To each his own though - gotta do what works for your family. /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/smile.gif
 

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Boeing has been sleeping with me since he was a little over one year old; and he's a little over five now and never an accident nor any dominance problem. I love having him snuggling up against my body and I can tell he loves it too. /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/smile.gif
 

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this is what my bed looks like ... yep that's 4 dogs in the bed !! there is barely enough room for me. I did crate all of them as young dogs but when they were safely housebroken they were allowed to sleep on the bed. I find comfort in knowing they are all there beside me !!
 

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good stuff what others have said.

My opinion I think it's a bit young to know how he will do with it. Meaning - will he have dominance issues and then he thinks he is boss cause he is in the bed, or will he be a mush and snuggle, and still know his place in the pack.

Marley will never sleep with us for several reasons - personally, the bed is our retreat and we want it to ourselves, we also deal a bit with Marley on dominance and know he probably would get the wrong idea. Lastly, and again, just our personal preference, we think dogs are great, and like our kids, but are still animals and walk around on the ground, so nah. Couch ok, sometimes, lap okay sometimes, but sleep with us, no.
 

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Whoever said "LET SLEEPING DOGS LIE" didn't sleep with dogs.

The first thing you discover when you bring a dog onto your bed is the
striking difference in weight between an alert, awake dog and a dog at
rest.

Rule Number One: The deeper the sleep the heavier the dog.

Most people who sleep with dogs develop spinal deformities rather than
rent the heavy equipment necessary to move their snoring canines to a
more appropriate part of the bed. Cunning canines steal precious space
in tiny increments until they have achieved the center position on the
bed - with all covers carefully tucked under them for safekeeping. The
stretch and roll method is very effective in gaining territory. Less
subtle tactics are sometimes preferred. A jealous dog can worm his way
between a sleeping couple and, with the proper spring action from all
four legs, shove a sleeping human to the floor.

Rule Number Two: Dogs possess superhuman strength while on a bed.
As you cling to the edge of the bed, wishing you had covers, your sweet
pup begins to snore at a volume you would not have thought possible.
Once that quiets down, the dog dreams begin. Yipping, growling, running,
kicking. Your bed becomes a battlefield and playground of canine
fantasy. It starts out with a bit of "sleep running", lots of eye
movement and then, suddenly, a shrieking howl blasted through the night
like a banshee wail. The horror of this wake-up call haunts you for
years. It's particularly devastating when your pup insists on sleeping
curled around your head like a demented Daniel Boone cap.

Rule Number Three: The deeper the sleep, the louder the dog.

The night creeps on and you fall asleep in the three inches of bed not
claimed by a dog. The dog dreams quiet slightly and the heap of dogflesh
sleeps breathing heavily and passing wind. Then, too soon, it's dawn and
the heap stirs. Each dog has a distinctive and unpleasant method of
waking the pack. One may position itself centimeters from a face and
stare until you wake. The clever dog obtains excellent results by
simply sneezing on your face, or they could romp all over your sleeping
bodies - or the ever-loving insertion of a tongue in an unsuspecting
ear.

Rule Number Four: When the dog wakes - you wake.

So, why do we put up with this? There's no sane reason. Perhaps it's
just that we're a pack and a pack heaps together at night - safe,
contented, heavy and loud.

Author Unknown
 

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As soon as Goober was housebroken...(very soon), he was allowed to sleep on my bed! "But" as he entered adulthood... he became "posessive" of my bed as if "it were his"! After he growled @ me when I came to bed... he was promptly exiled to his own bed for 2 weeks! After that, he knew who was the "top-dawg" & has been warming my armpit,s ever since! Homer-the-Huge is content to being a "foot-warmer" as his large size prohibits a better placement on my bed! :thumbup:
 

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Quote:Originally posted by threedognight:
Whoever said "LET SLEEPING DOGS LIE" didn't sleep with dogs.

The first thing you discover when you bring a dog onto your bed is the
striking difference in weight between an alert, awake dog and a dog at
rest.

Rule Number One: The deeper the sleep the heavier the dog.

Most people who sleep with dogs develop spinal deformities rather than
rent the heavy equipment necessary to move their snoring canines to a
more appropriate part of the bed. Cunning canines steal precious space
in tiny increments until they have achieved the center position on the
bed - with all covers carefully tucked under them for safekeeping. The
stretch and roll method is very effective in gaining territory. Less
subtle tactics are sometimes preferred. A jealous dog can worm his way
between a sleeping couple and, with the proper spring action from all
four legs, shove a sleeping human to the floor.

Rule Number Two: Dogs possess superhuman strength while on a bed.
As you cling to the edge of the bed, wishing you had covers, your sweet
pup begins to snore at a volume you would not have thought possible.
Once that quiets down, the dog dreams begin. Yipping, growling, running,
kicking. Your bed becomes a battlefield and playground of canine
fantasy. It starts out with a bit of "sleep running", lots of eye
movement and then, suddenly, a shrieking howl blasted through the night
like a banshee wail. The horror of this wake-up call haunts you for
years. It's particularly devastating when your pup insists on sleeping
curled around your head like a demented Daniel Boone cap.

Rule Number Three: The deeper the sleep, the louder the dog.

The night creeps on and you fall asleep in the three inches of bed not
claimed by a dog. The dog dreams quiet slightly and the heap of dogflesh
sleeps breathing heavily and passing wind. Then, too soon, it's dawn and
the heap stirs. Each dog has a distinctive and unpleasant method of
waking the pack. One may position itself centimeters from a face and
stare until you wake. The clever dog obtains excellent results by
simply sneezing on your face, or they could romp all over your sleeping
bodies - or the ever-loving insertion of a tongue in an unsuspecting
ear.

Rule Number Four: When the dog wakes - you wake.

So, why do we put up with this? There's no sane reason. Perhaps it's
just that we're a pack and a pack heaps together at night - safe,
contented, heavy and loud.

Author Unknown
lol thats classic
 
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