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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
If anyone has any advice I would appreciate it. I adopted Sweetie Mid November. She has been fairly shy. She has now fallen into a routine but her manuerisms (sp?) are getting worse by the day.

Each morning she sleeps in bed until noon. I usually end up telling her to come out which she does. She walks in fear down the hall then runs out the door.

She used to stay out maybe 1-2 hours? then would either come back in or stay out until our walk in the woods which she loves.

She used to run to me to get the leash on and we would go. Now I cannot get her to come to me and it is getting very aggrivating. If I call her she looks at me then looks elswhere.

The other day I had to pick up my step son. I could not for the life of me get her in the house or near me.

I don't chase her, but even ignoring her is not working. I know this probably does not make sense so ask questions! I have hit boiling point and am ready to leave her out almost round the clock which I rather not do.
 

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how old is Sweetie?

She sounds like my 5 month old Glover, he is at the brat stage, does not come when he's called (used to do just fine a couple of weeks ago!) and just ignores us..

I find getting him to come to me now takes treats! I get alot of treats, crouch down and call a really excited 'come glover'. This works for me.

sorry if Im no help... but I hope it answers something.

x
K
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The shelter put her at 4 years. Treats don't work for her. Tried that, but thanks for the input!
 

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Do you know anything about her before the adoption? She might have reached a point where she is comfortable with your family and realized she can get away with murder.
It seems like she is the dominant one in the house.
Try this: when feeding her, first pretend you are eating out of the bowl first, while making her sit at a distance from you. Only when she is calm and relaxed, let her approach the food and eat. Make sure she does something for you before you give her anything (even before you pet her).
Use an assertive tone when talking to her, and when you reach the point where she is reacting to what you're saying, have her seat before you put the leash on her for the walks.

Oh, and another important thing: when you look her in the eyes, make sure she looks away first!!!

I hope this helps...
 

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Oh yes, sound familiar with Charlie, dominance. He has gotten much better now.
A few tips from the trainer see if it applies to Sweetie.
Just like Chloe's mom said when feeding pay more attention to how you feed. But I never pretend to eat out from his bowl though. Try scooping the kibbles with your hands onto the bowl. The meaning is that it has your smell on it and from your hand to the bowl, food is only from you. If more than 20 minutes untouched, take it back...no more food. And also feeding time is after we have our dinner.
When walking through doors always you walk out first. Put her in a sit position by the open door, you walk out first then said OK come.
Never let her sit on your foot or your lap or just on you. Never let them be in a higher position, like up on a sofa, up on a chair, even upstairs. They think they are surperior. Get your control back as an alfa. But then again these methods are for dominant dogs, like I said some are sweet heart.
It worked on Charlie, so try it and see.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
She is submissive with me. She is just flat out panicked. If she is in the living room she "hides" her head under a blanket or lays behind me.

You are right though....She DOES NOT listen....I am worried being to stern will make her more scared.

My husband was just stern with her making her sit in the living room with all of us. She starts shaking violently and licking her jowls.

Like I said, it seems to be getting worse (the recluse behavior)
 

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I think at this point, a trip to an obedience class would do a world of good. It sounds like you need to start at the beginning in training with this baby. Invest in a crate - if you haven't already. I'd buy one with only the grill and the rest plastic. This will give her a space to "hide." I'd put it in a place where your family often spends a lot of time - and close all doors in the home so that she has to be with you.

I'd also invest in a clicker - not all dogs (yes even food driven dogs like Beagles) will respond to the same type stimulus. Some dogs like squeaky toys, some prefer food, others like the clicker. Keep a collar on her - and if you have to, maybe even loop the leash on your pant loop and keep her by your side. She needs to learn that you all are not scary.

I think these ideas would be a good way to start; but definitely look into obedience class /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/smile.gif I also want to say the best of luck to you!
 

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That bad ha?
You should, as Jamie suggested, consider an obedience class, a behaviorist trainer... someone professional! It should help.

Good Luck!
 

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I adopted a rescue dog three years ago as an adult. It takes a month or so for the true personality to emerge.....and usually with a TON of baggage to go with it. Love and patience will win the day.

Professional advice would be helpful; do tons of research and find some help. Using dominance exercises on a dog with that much anxiety will not be effective and will set your cause way back.

I haven't had the same experience with my rescue dog, but it still took almost a year before he learned how to play with toys. There are many people here with rescue dogs.......perhaps they will weigh in on your question.

I wish you luck; meantime, keep her on a leash both inside and outside the house. Keep her with you, build her confidence with treats and praise when she performs accepted behavior. Begin again with the bonding process and teach her what is expected with love and praise.
 

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I think you've gotten some good advice here - including that many rescue dogs do come with "excess baggage". I know my "Lottie" STILL has issues. She'd always been a "kennel dog" until I adopted her about 2 1/2 years ago - I saw her picture online and fell in love with her, she looked sooooo vulnerable and so sad - and tho I had no plans to add another beagle to the pack, something about her "called" to me. I'm so glad it did, as she came with many physical problems as well as "psychological". The day after I picked her up at the airport, I took her to my vet (as I always do with ANY dog I add to the pack), and he immediately performed emergency oral surgery on her - removing 7 abcessed and/or broken teeth - and in the process discovering that her little jaw had been broken at some time, and he removed a dime-sized chunk of dead, black bone from her jaw. She also had an ear infection - tape worms, and a uterine infection. She was extremely shy, cowering at any loud noise or sudden movement. She is so much better - but it's taken a lot of work and love with her and she STILL cowers at times :eyes: . With your permission, I'd like to ask my co-manager on my beagle group for HER advice - she's helped me a lot - and is very knowledgeable. Let me know if it's alright to seek her advice. She's VERY good with training issues.
 

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Very good advise above.

I would add a trip to the vet to check her over and get advice. Then see if you have any dog trainers or dog behaviorist that can come to your house and give you a one on one session. We had some behavior issues when ours were young and had a dog trainer come over. It was very helpful. Good luck and keep us posted.

It does not sound like a dominance issue to me at all. Sounds like she has some baggage and has a lot of fears.

How long did you say you have had her?
 

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It sounds far more like fear than dominance to me. Do you know her history before the rescue centre? We have two ex research beagles and they were very nervous when we first got them. All they wanted to do was sleep and be left alone. You havent had sweetie long, so let her have more time to adjust. Shut all the doors in the house except where you are sitting. Dont force her to come to you for cuddles, try to ignore her, but if she does come to you then gently stroke her and put your arm round her. She loves walks, that is great, make her sit whilst you put her harness on and tell her ' walkies'. When you return home, let her stay in the garden if she wishes. Let her sleep half the day if she wishes, ours did, eventually she will feel safe in your house and want to be with you. once over that stage you can start training her, but dont rush things.
 

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When I first got Henry (adopted at 1 year), he learned to trust and respect me and most of his commands. However, coming when called was not his strong point. He was not as fearful as Sweetie, but he was not interested in coming. I left a leash on him at all times, would call him, and if he didn't come, I would bring him to me with the leash. I would praise him confidently and quietly for coming, even though he didn't really do it himself. The most important thing is to remain calm and assertive. It is so hard not to project your own emotions of fear, anxiety, or frustration on your dog. I know you want Sweetie to be happy and know she's loved, but she doesn't understand it quite yet! Don't be afraid to leave the leash on for hours as long as you're around. This will help her face her fears and realize she must come to you. After she's pretty good at this, call her and immediately turn and walk away. As soon as you hear those tags jingling, turn back around and praise her for coming. She'll get it then.
Melissa
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Thank you for the advice everyone. Today she was much better until walk time. She was running around like a puppy wanting to play (meaning not coming on command). My hubby cornered her behind the shed so she would come to me...then the pannick set in.

She did come to me but ended up cutting her nose and the corner of her eye.

I really can't explain her! Sometimes she acts like a puppy throwing a fit (leash chewing, not coming when called etc)....

On the other hand she has a deep fear of everything. I think it is time for some obedience as well as love. I do know what to do.... if you are too stern fear sets in so I am unsure on how to find the happy medium. I will keep you informed on her progress.
 

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It really sounds like Sweetie has a lot of rescue baggage. Did the shelter you got her from have any history on her? Who knows what happened to her in the four or so years before you got her. If she was abused or mis-treated, it's going to take a lot of time for her to learn to trust people again. Just stay patient with her. She'll eventually come around, but it's going to take time.
 

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I really think she has some "baggage" - and you'll probably never know what it is - just as I don't know what my Lottie's "baggage" is - she is soooo much better than she was when she came here, but it still breaks my heart when she "cowers" at noises or movements. She DOES love all of us (daughter, son in law and me), but we all have to be very careful. If I call her with a treat in my hand, she won't come UNLESS I get down to her level - then she'll come get it - otherwise, she just sits and looks at me. If I kneel down with the treat in my hand, she'll come get it. She likes to sleep with me and curls up on my arm, she loves to be talked to and petted.
Here's my "scared little girl", "Ladmar's Whole Lotta Trouble" - aka "Little Lottie".
 

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I have to repeat, give her time. Dont chase her or corner her, that will make her panic. Today has probably made matters worse, but I know you mean well. So please dont panic and take things a step at a time. Does she go to the toilet in the garden? Then let her. I fear she has some past experience that will take time for her to get over. First step is for her to trust you. Read my message above. We have been through this with our two rescues.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
No one had any info except she was housebroken and could sit stay come and get in her kennel on command. She didn't know any of that when I got her. I think someone made a poor excuse to take her to the shelter. Someone adopted her for 3 weeks prior to me and returned her. That is all I know.
 

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I think many beagles wind up in shelters and rescues because they ARE a little "different" - one of the assistants on my beagle group has two beagles from shelters - the first had been in 3 homes by the time he was nine months old - he came with so many issues - he was frightened of almost everything - but Margie was determined that hers would be his "forever home". She worked with him, took him to obedience classes, both "beginning" and advanced, and he's now a "certified therapy dog" and goes to nursing homes and hospice. Everyone loves him. But he STILL refuses to go down the steps into the basement - and he goes absolutely berserk if he's crated. He's got a wonderful home, two "human parents" who love him, but he still has some insecurities. Some people consider their pets "disposable". You know, sometimes the best thing to do is NOT to try so hard with our little rescues who are so frightened. It works better for Lottie if I let her come to me - and she does.
 
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