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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok, so Hugo is 9 months old now and we had him since he was 12 weeks old. A few weeks after we brought him home he began to show some aggression, it first happened when i picked up his bone and he tried to bite me. It's been happening for a while now but is becoming less and less as we're trying very hard to not bring the behaviour out,,. for example if we need him to drop something we'll just distract him with a treat. However, today my dad was painting in the utility room so he wasn't allowed in, he had to take the door off so we were being careful not to let him in. My Mam went into the utility and Hugo tried to follow, so my Dad blocked him with his arm.. nothing else and he bit him on the arm. Enough to draw blood, he hasn't bitten this bad before and my Mam is starting to become scared of him. We're now going to try to ignore him a little bit, i don't mean properly ignore, but just not make too much of a fuss and treat him more like a dog than a baby. I'm just wondering has anybody else had this problem and what;s the best way to deal with it, does anybody have any tips?
Thanks very much in advance!
 

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he needs reminded who is in charge.
everyone should make him sit or lie down before any interaction or before getting food.
if he gets aggressive or bites yell NO or BAD DOG.
yell it loud like you're mad.:mad: he should be surprised by it.:scary:
then remove him to the garage or a bathroom for a minute of time out.
after a minute crack open the door and tell him to sit. then he can come out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hello dudley, thanks for your advice. We all make Hugo earn his food before we give it to him, he can do a few tricks, he sits, gives paws, lies down and runs backwards if you say leave. And we practice these often. We've tried shouting at him but i don't think he understands, he tends to think it's a game and it just makes him worse, and if you shout at him when he's aggressive it just makes him more aggressive back to you. I do agree with the time out and wish we could do this, but it's VERY hard to get him into a room to give him time out, we usually put him in the utility when he's naughty, but to get him in you have to throw food in which defeats the point. You can't pick him up or grab his collar when he's aggressive cos he'll just bite and he won't listen if you tell him to go in. So it's pretty hard! Thanks for your advice though. We're just a bit stuck with him at the minute. As i said before we're gonna try a bit more with the "no fuss" method so he doesn't see himself as such a high priority, we don't know what else to do! He can be very difficult, eventhough he has had episodes of biting he doesn't do it often anymore and it's getting less and less, so we really just need a way to cope with it when he does, and we need a way to tell him that it's not acceptable as he just doesn't seem to understand.
 

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He might be a little old for this to work, but if he does bite or nip, say ouch really loud and turn away and ignore him. This is more for puppies so it may not work great. Usually biting is a dominance thing. He is trying to move up in the pack. That is why it is important that everyone be above him in the pack. Something I have heard of but never actually done is called NILF. Nothing in Life is Free. I don't know enough about it to give it justice, but if you google it I am sure you will find information about it. Some people swear by it for dominant dogs.
Good Luck
 

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I would have him vet checked to make sure there is no medical issue going on. If cleared I would put him in a obiedence training class. It sounds like he never learned how to use his mouth properly. It's called bite inhibition. it's what Tucker posted about in the YIPE if he puts his mounth on you. But in all honestly he is getting out of control and your best bet is a obediance class and also the NILF.
Dog Tip: Bite Inhibition -- an Essential Part of Socialization
 

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What do you feed him? DO you give him any treats/snacks during the day or does he just get his proper meals? Also, Do you play tug of war games or play with Hugo on his level? If you do, or did when he was a puppy, he may think that you are just a play thing and you're not his boss. He needs to be reminded that you're the boss (that goes for everyone in the household).

The best advice I can give you is DON'T tiiptoe around him... Don't let the thought of him biting change how you do things in your house. He will be able to sense that you're worrying about his aggression which will make him feel like he is 'above you' in the pack.

Carry on as normal... give him lots of attention when he is being good, play fetching games and still give him cuddles but don't play any rough games with him. Don't ever be below him. (eg... dont let him sit of the sofa if you're on the floor... always be 'higher' than him). If he looks like he's going to bite... say, very firmly, "NO!" and push him away.

If he DOES bite... shout "NO" and (if you can) grab him by the scruff of the neck and put him somewhere that he doesnt want to be. (Putting him outside may not be a punishment if he plays out there). As you said... the utility room would be the ideal place.

Don't worry about hurting him... the mothers do that when they are pups... if they get too rough or push the boundaries too far... the mother will pick them up by the scruff of their neck and seperate them from the rest of the pack. Thats exactly what you need to do.

Good Luck!!!
 

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Also, ignoring him (turning your back on him) works well in conjunction with other methods. You (and whoever he is trying to be dominant over/bite) could try yelling "NO!" and turning your backs for a fe minutes. Ignoring him gives him the message that his behavior was unacceptable to the pack. Then I would tell him to sit, and go on with what you were doing - don't give him any additional attention for his bad behavior.
 

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I have a zero - and I mean ZERO tolerance for biting, growling or unnecessary barking. Sullivan had some bad habits by the time I got him at 4 mths and it was murder to re-train him but zero tolerance helped.

My rule - I pay the bills. I pay for what you get ergo it's mine when I want it. I'm the boss and he can try but he won't win.

1/ Don't be afraid. He knows you're afraid of being bitten and he's gonna use that leverage. He bites fine, you deal with that when it happens and it will at first.

2/ No. It's all you have to say in a voice you actually mean. It doesn't have to be yelled. You don't have to be aggressive. NO.

3/ Punishment. Just like a child there needs to be consequences. Sullivan gets a no. He gets whatever he has taken away from him and if he continues to growl or snap he goes straight into his crate/kennel. Period. Grabbed by the collar. Bad Boy and in the crate. The next time he gets whatever it is back, if I can't take it from him again without a scene start at #1 and go all over again.

At this point, the minute Sullivan growls or misbehaves he KNOWS he's in trouble. He still does it occasionally but sparingly.

You own the house. You pay the mortgage. You make the rules.

When he does all three he has earned the right to growl and bite. Until then, only you have that privilege.
 

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You own the house. You pay the mortgage. You make the rules.

When he does all three he has earned the right to growl and bite. Until then, only you have that privilege.

The only beagle I know of that could probably pay the mortgage is Uno.
 

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I have a zero - and I mean ZERO tolerance for biting, growling or unnecessary barking. Sullivan had some bad habits by the time I got him at 4 mths and it was murder to re-train him but zero tolerance helped.

My rule - I pay the bills. I pay for what you get ergo it's mine when I want it. I'm the boss and he can try but he won't win.

1/ Don't be afraid. He knows you're afraid of being bitten and he's gonna use that leverage. He bites fine, you deal with that when it happens and it will at first.

2/ No. It's all you have to say in a voice you actually mean. It doesn't have to be yelled. You don't have to be aggressive. NO.

3/ Punishment. Just like a child there needs to be consequences. Sullivan gets a no. He gets whatever he has taken away from him and if he continues to growl or snap he goes straight into his crate/kennel. Period. Grabbed by the collar. Bad Boy and in the crate. The next time he gets whatever it is back, if I can't take it from him again without a scene start at #1 and go all over again.

At this point, the minute Sullivan growls or misbehaves he KNOWS he's in trouble. He still does it occasionally but sparingly.

You own the house. You pay the mortgage. You make the rules.

When he does all three he has earned the right to growl and bite. Until then, only you have that privilege.
I agree with a lot of what you say but not the part about putting the dog in the crate as a punishment. The crate is a secure place that the dog should be happy to be in, not something associated with being 'bad'.

Sure, use the crate for some time out but put the dog in calmly and then reward for settling down. If you put him in forcibly, as you appear to do, then you are missing the point of having a crate. All imo of course.
 

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The crate in theory is a safe haven.
Not a punishment, right?
In my opinion and it is only my opinion!- you never punish a dog only train him, not housebrake but housetrain, and also only in my opinion the crate could be like a den but at the moment you close the door it is only a cage to trap the animal. Wild animals have a den but there is no door on it.
My dog is housetrained, doesn't chew anymore, barks only when I tell him and also stops it when I tell him and never bites anymore.
He did all those things. The trainer helped a lot and he had to grow up and of course you have to have patience, a lot of it. Still I have issues I have to work on but this is all about having a dog.
 

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We have to be careful not to expect too much from our dogs. It's not like they are born knowing what the rules are, it's not like they misbehave to deliberately antagonise us.

Our dogs don't understand that we pay the mortgage, buy all their toys and food for them etc, and while I totally agree we should teach our dogs that we control the resources, it's not fair to punish them for something we haven't taught them.

If I was eating a delicious chocolate cake or playing with my new favourite toy and someone came over to me and took it off me, I'd have a go at them too! If they did this every time I had something I valued, I'd come to expect that every time they walked by when I had something I enjoyed, that they are going to take it away from me. I'd start preempting this by running and hiding or telling them to back off. Dogs are no different.

If, on the other hand, I was taught I had to look to them for permission to have something I really wanted, and that it's no big deal to give something I value up because I will be rewarded for it and it doesn't happen every time I have something exciting then I wouldn't have a problem relinquishing what I have.

We're now going to try to ignore him a little bit, i don't mean properly ignore, but just not make too much of a fuss and treat him more like a dog than a baby.
Laura at least you recognise that you were babying him and treating him like a person not a dog :) I would start implementing some strict boundaries and guidelines now.

Try nothing in life is free:

Nothing in Life is Free

I also use The Triangle of Temptation with my dogs;

www.k9pro.com.au/pages.php?pageid=52
http://www.k9pro.com.au/pages.php?pageid=52
 

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I do everything Sullivan's Mom does...except when she's bad I put her in the playgate which we've designated as a TO area. Before I got that, we put her in the crate, but found after a few days she disliked sleeping in it/left in it when we went out.
 

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I use the crate as a time out for training. So far hasn't effected her crate training, she just knows our training game ends if she does x y or z and that she will have to sit in her crate. It hasn't made the crate a bad place to be.
Nothiong wrong with the crate as a time out, it's how you put them in there that is the issue. If you grab them by the scruff of the neck and throw them in, as suggested earlier, then the crate as a safe place can be compromised.
 

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Nothiong wrong with the crate as a time out, it's how you put them in there that is the issue. If you grab them by the scruff of the neck and throw them in, as suggested earlier, then the crate as a safe place can be compromised.
Totally agree with you there Ian :)

I don't see when scruffing a dog would be necessary ever if the time out is a punishment?

I use a no reward marker (oops or no) said with no anger, just a neutral tone as I pop her into the crate. I can't see a purpose for using anything stronger.
 
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