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Despite the negative feedback I got from people when I brought Maggie home, I have enjoyed her immensely. She is smart, engaging, funny and very naughty. During obedience, I hear people with other breeds of dogs talking about the same issues I have had with Maggie like the digging, stubborn tendencies,etc. My friend is looking for a puppy for her kids and has been reading books and websites. She asked me why beagles are always rated as more difficult to work with.Since Maggie is my first pup, I couldn't answer her. I know that a few of you also have other breeds and thought you might be able to help. I told my friend that if getting another dog was an option for me, I would definitely choose a beagle! She is such a clown and even when she is being "naughty", like stealing my book when I went to the kitchen for coffee, there is such intelligence and a look in her eyes like she is laughing at me, I wouldn't trade that for an "easier" dog.
 

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Beagles can be very stubborn at times. This often makes people think that they are stupid. That is so far from the truth...they are very smart. They just don't like to do things unless there is some benefit to them. I can get Jersey to do virtually anything by dangling a nice meaty treat in front of her. Once you get through that though, it's great. You've got a loving, loyal dog to keep you company for a long, long time. Oh, and that "laughing" look...I know it so well. I definitely think it is there way of saying HA HA, I've got your (book, shoe, box of tissues, magazine, etc...)
 

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Actually, it is not only the Beagle pups that differ from other pups, but the Beagle adult that differ from other adult dogs as well.
Beagles are not for everyone. Those who loves them absolutely adore them, those who do not cannot stand them. In order to live with a Beagle you need patience, tolerance, consistancy and a good sense of humor. To be able to live with a Beagle you must be willing to LIVE WITH your beagle and not beside him/her. And this is often this very fact that brings the Beagle to the shelter. People want dogs that are cute. God Beagles are cute! They want a dog who has a good contact with kids. We all know the Beagle is great for that. They want a dog who can entertain them. No shortage there. They want a playful dog. Well, I'm still not sure Beagles know where to stop. They want, or so they say, a bright dog. I think Beagles often outsmart us... Unfortunately, they also want a dog who can stay in the backyard, out of the way when they have no time for him, they also want a dog who "knows his place", being the perfect little angel that listen to his master without any effort on the part of the owner, they want a dog with an "ON" and "OFF" switch. This, a Beagle is not. The Beagle is demanding in the eye of the wrong owner, and the best companion in the right home. They are hunters, and therefore must be able to tune everything out in their mind but the one scent they wish to follow. Well, we all know what that means in our daily life! LOL! They were bred with such a concentration that they seem to live in their own little world sometimes, which made them refered to as "Schizophrenic". This ability to focus on one thing and one thing only is what make them appear "stubborn", what make them seem to be defiant at time. This is what make many trainer faulsly say that a Beagle is not trainable.
In order to do the job they were bred for, they need to think, to plan, to scheme. Rings a bell??? This intelligence is what allow them to play, to make up game, to interact with us. It is also what allow them to get bored at time, and then to become destructive.
For the job they were intended for, they had to have a powerful nose, one that can track a scent twice to 3 times as easily as most dogs. And we want him to ignore the roast on the counter top?... This nose is the reason why beagles are not suited for a home who do not clean up after them, with adolescent leaving the pate or the cheese on the table after making their snaks. He is not suited either in a home where we feed the toddler on the cafe table, or leave candies and cookies as a display in the family room.
Yes, the Beagle is different, in many ways, and is not the easiest dog for those who plenly want a dog. Have you ever looked deep inside the eyes of your Beagle? Don't you see something, a glare, an expression which appear totally human? The Beagle is more than just a dog, he belongs to a category of canine who possess a higher process of thought and understanding. But for the home who truly want a companion to interact with as one would with a child, a person, then, it is the most fun, loving, unique dog ever known.
This, at least, is my belief.
 

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Yes very good post Cheerio, you described the Beagle perfectly.

Quote:Originally posted by cheerio:
The Beagle is more than just a dog, he belongs to a category of canine who possess a higher process of thought and understanding.
I would like to know though what other breeds that you would say fall into the same category?
 

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I can only agree strongly with Cheerio´s post..its right on as our Snoopy is concerned.
I must admitt that I sometimes find it a bit "scary" what goes on inside this little Beagles brain. He very often does things that is almost a little too human and "smart" for an animal.Living together with a Beagle surely will teach you that this breed of dog certanly is neither stupid, dumb or stubborn but only has hes own will and thoughts.
Thats why we love hi so dearly :heart:
Snoopys mom
 

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With our minimum experience so far, the two puppies we have are no different to the other puppies I've had - although they were a family pet and not "mine".

They were "bitsa" dogs, no real idea of what they were apart from a pound special, although one was very staffy/cattle dog cross looking and the other very whippet/cattle dog cross looking.

I'm sure as they get older the differences will be more apparent, but so far no problems at all with them as puppies. Not even whimpering at night /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/smile.gif
 

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Cheerio said just about everything that can be said about our Beags!!

I, personally, love them for their loving personalities, whether stubborn or willful. That's what makes them who they are. I love a dog that has the capacity to constantly surprise me (sometimes bad surprises) but mostly "how did you figure that out!" or that certain look "concocting a plan of action for MORE tidbits" they get in their eyes.

I love them because they 'love' you back. Daisy is so gentle with everything she amazes me with her delicacy and yet she can run like the wind, especially when she's happy -- you can feel all that joy and it makes you joyful, too!

There are many dogs who make us happy, but I think Beagles are all-around dogs who have more good traits wrapped up in one good-looking package.

Monica and Daisy /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/smile.gif
 

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Excellent post, Cheerio!

I have looked into my Henry's eyes...really looked and connected.

I believe that beagle eyes are deep and soulful. Sometimes my Henry looks almost human.
 

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No truer words have been spoken Cheerio !!!!

double ditto to that !!
 

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Awesome, Cherrio!

"The look".
That's what makes the picture of Murphy at the top of the page so, I don't know... "Creepy". That look that says, "I've got you figured out much better than you have me figured out."
My Sadie's doing it to me in the picture below!
 

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Great post, Cheerio! I almost fell on the floor laughing when I read the part about candies and cookies on the coffee table. I can just picture Ginger and Chloe having a field day!
 

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Excellently said Cheerio.

Right now we have a Golden Retreiver and a Beagle puppy. There both loving and sweet temperment, both great with our 6 month old daughter. Something I've noticed thats different is that Welington (our beags) likes motivation to do something ie a tasty treat. He is also an excellent escape artist. He's also more calm with our daughter, when shes on the floor he comes up to her and puts his head on her tummy and cuddles, bear is excitted more and walks on her if you don't watch. Where Bear (our golden) is very praise orientated.
 

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Ditto to Cheerio as well! There are many different breeds (for a reason)! (Not that I place any stock) on astrolygy, but I am also stubborn & hard-headed as the sign of Taurus would indicate! (10th of May). But a beag just seems to be such a natural fit to my personality! :thumbup: Plus they are very sneaky & can be masters of stealh like I am!...Even though I try to avoid scaring some of my co-workers & strangers...but it must be the American/Indian blood in me that startels many of them! /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/eek.gif I often wear my keys on an outer belt hook, to simmulate the sound of "spurs", but some of these "hard-hearing folk" are still surprized by my "sudden presence"! /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/eek.gif My "Talent" does not just apply to the "human-world"...As I have surprized many deer while still sleeping in their beds! :thumbup:
 

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Cheerio’s comments are spot on! As Wellington’s provider noticed with Wellington, he responds well to treats (bribes) while the retriever responds well to praise. Beagles can come to appreciate praise as well but the key is reward and love wiuth both of those breeds. Rough handling training like you might do with a guard dog dog does not work. Stern words and negative feedback do not work. That is where patience and IMHO the maturity and wisdom of the trainer must manifest to have success in training a beagle.

The key is that beagles were bred to be independent thinkers. The evaluate all their options, do not blindly respond to a command. You say come, the beagle mind evaluates, if there is not a fresh scent, and hunting opportunity, something else to interest the beagle, the beagle will come.. Herd dogs, like border collies, look to their master for direction. The beagle has no master, he has his fellow pack members of which you should be the alpha member but he expects cooperation within the pack and if he gets a fresh scent, it is the packs duty to support him. Many in the dog training world thrill at the blind obedience of the Border Collie and they rate the black and white flashes as the “smartest dog.” These same “experts” are intimidated by the independent thinking beagle and rather that work as the alpha in the beagle’s cooperative pack, dismiss the beagle as un-trainable and less intelligent. This is balderdash, beagles are easy to train if you recognize them as a beagle and again IMHO way to smart for many so-called experts.

Bassets are more laid back than Beagles, Blue Ticks are bigger, foxhounds, bloodhounds, etc. are unique to their specific breed but “scenthounds” in general are unlike the rest of the canine world. You either love scenthounds and the traits that make them unique or just find fault with those traits. There is no on/off switch with a scenthound and especially a beagle. You are part of their pack 24/7 and those that appreciate these merry little hounds will never understand how anyone could not be enamored by their beagles traits and those that don’t will never understand the joy a human owned by a beagle derives from the special relationship.
 
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