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We had our home visit today and I think it went well! We are excited about the idea of having a dog in the house again! Here's hoping we are approved and can get started in finding the right dog for us!!

Just had to share!
 

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Nice!! I remember how nervous I was when we first started out rescuing.
 

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We've never had a home visit for either Lucy or Rascal. I would be curious about what they look for.
techie
 

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It's funny, when I applied to get a greyhound the app process was pretty intense, plus the home and yard inspection. They wanted to be sure we had a fenced yard, ample house size, no tie outs, and also do we own our home. They ask if you rent do you have landlord permission. Do you have a vet? They checked our vet reference also. And they want to know what other pets you have or had and why you don't have they anymore (like did they pass away of old age or did you re-home them).

Then when we applied to get Molly our beagle, they were like "oh you rescued a greyhound?" and we didn't have to have the home visit and passed right thru the selection process.
 

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This is exactly what we experienced. Funny you have a greyhound. We wanted one but found after some soul searching that our lifestyle (full time work dual income family) made that breed not a gift of fit. I can't wait to hear if we passed!
 

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I am sure you did fine :)

We had two greyhounds when we rescued Molly.
 

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Good luck, I'd think they could tell you pretty much on the spot - but who knows.

We started out trying to get a beagle/beagle mix pup from one of the dozens of local rescues, but they all had forms to fill out and wanted home visits. Some of their websites said you needed to have a fenced yard (most of these rescues are city people) - we have a 25 acre dog park about 2 miles away. Invariably before we could even get the paperwork looked at the pups were gone and the next pup was at a different place requiring different paperwork. In the end we looked up a reputable breeder, called them up and put down a deposit on the smallest female of a new litter they had. Paid the same amount for an AKC beagle that the rescues were asking for their pups. Picked her up a month later when she was old enough. I respect what the rescues are attempting to do, but in the end they made it such a pain that it wasn't worth it to deal with them.
 

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Shelters are generally easier to deal with than rescue groups for sure. When we rescued Oliver from the shelter, we went to meet him, filled out a small amount of paperwork and then picked him up a few days later.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
We are approved!! Just a few more steps until we have a beagle in our home! While searching for the right dog what do you all suggest we do that be prepared? The more ideas the better!
 

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Congrats! Some lucky beagle with have a forever home soon!

You can research dog foods to be sure you are feeding a healthy diet. This site is a great help: Dog Food Reviews and Ratings | Dog Food Advisor

If you have a fenced in yard you can check it out carefully for any openings that a dog might use to escape. Beagles are smart and can squeeze into all sorts of areas.

If you don't have a vet yet you can start checking out the local ones for hours, services, emergency services etc.
 

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We are approved!! Just a few more steps until we have a beagle in our home! While searching for the right dog what do you all suggest we do that be prepared? The more ideas the better!
Make sure you post pictures!
This is a puppy,right?
Get a crate , get a good size one since they grow fast. My dog will be 5 yrs nxt month and loves her crate.
My dog chewed up 5 fluffy beds so don't rush into getting one. A kiddie plastic pool works great with lots of old towels. Get tough twisted ropes for play. Go to www.dogfoodadvisor.com for resource on quality food.
Get the dog to the vet within 48hrs for a check up.
Keep the dog in a restricted area of your house until it can be trusted with monitoring. Potty train by taking the dog on a leash to where you want it to do the biz.
Take to puppy obedience training once it has all the vaccines.
Hope this helps.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Actually we are looking for an older dog. But not too old. Maybe in the 2-7 range as far as ages. Great suggestions! Keep them coming!
 

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I am so glad you are looking for an adult! So many of them in the shelters. Molly and Vazzle were 2 when we got them and Oliver was 6.
 

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My .02 - based only on a sample size of 2 beagles that I got as puppies. Not sure how much this works with a pre-owned/pre-trained dog

1) Find out what they have been feeding the dog and stick with that, if it is a crap food then gradually switch them over to something better. Ours eats Diamond Natural because that is what the breeder fed and I was able to get it locally without much trouble.

2) Lots of toys to chew on, and not size appropriate toys - lab sized stuff. My beagle is a chewing machine that can destroy a small dog toy in 5 minutes. Don't just lay a pile of them out. Present each toy to your dog so that they know it belongs to them, that way when you are yelling at them for chewing on a shoe they can eventually figure out the difference between what was given to them and what they found on their own. Mine ran across a bag full of beanie babies a few months ago that my wife uses for teaching (kids) Piper grabbed one, came across the house and set it down to see if it was OK since she was not given it. I said no and she left it - went and grabbed another. This kept on until I figured out where they were coming from. She has dog toys that look the same and would have disemboweled it in minutes if she thought it was hers.

3) Beagle proofing. Anything wood laying around - pencils especially mine seems to think is a stick, not a toy - there fore item 2 doesn't apply. A healthy beagle can jump a baby gate without thinking about it so don't assume they will do any good.

4) Hopefully the dogs are already potty trained and have a way of signaling you. Both of ours figured out that scratching on the door was how to get outside. The potty training was like training a child - if they even look like they are thinking about peeing or pooping they go outside. I was around 24/7 for pretty much the first year so this made it easier, she pooped in the house twice and peed inside occasionally for the first couple weeks - nothing since then.

5) Some folks say beagles bark and howl all the time, haven't experienced that with ours. If she barks then she was taken inside or calmed if it was another dog walking down the street, which has led to a single bark meaning that she wants in. Not sure why our 2 dogs only ever bayed for rabbits, other beagles at the local dog park are baying from the second they get in the gate. If she smells a rabbit she will head to the correct window and attempt to claw through it.

6) Other training - food doesn't work well, at least with mine. My wife started training her to sit and lay down with treats. Well if you had a treat that is what she would do and she could smell when you had one. This led to her sitting or laying down at the feet of everyone at the dog park that she could tell had food. Took a while to get that to go away and went to training exclusively with praise which they really seem to thrive on.

7) Bed - no dogs in my bed, so we had to make sure she had something she liked. Not much interest in open beds and then we found clamshell beds - Snoozer cozy cave is the brand. Lets them burrow and snuggle up, took her about 2 minutes to figure it out and take the first nap. My dog hated the crate from the time we got her at 8 weeks, she freaked out so bad the first time that we put her in one that she caught her jaw in the grating (steel cube crate). We got rid of that and got a plastic crate, still freaked out no matter how many times we tried. Wound up just not crating her - last dog was never crated either. Not sure why, except that she had spent the first 8 weeks in a good sized room at the breeders house with a dozen beagles/pups and was not ever contained to a small space.

8) Tired beagle is a good beagle. She gets a 2 mile leash walk in the morning and then an hour or so at the 25 acre wooded dog park in the evening. Translates into about 5 miles for me total and probably 8 for her ;) This pretty much guarantees that she naps and is calm the rest of the day, which is good because I work from home. Get used to baths because mine loves to jump into any little swamp at the park and rub her head in all sorts of stuff (thankfully not poop). They are a working dog and get really fat when they don't get enough exercise (or too much food)

9) Dog park - if you get an older dog with unknown history, make real sure you know how it behaves around other dogs - more than just a couple of them. Most of the issues I see at the local dog park are with newly rescued dogs that are either dog or human aggressive, and not with all dogs or humans. My favorite one that has happened 3 times now with different dogs is having a dog come charging up, circling me while growling - owner comes up (always a lady) and tells me oh, it doesn't like men. (Not a good off leash dog then)

Beagles think they are big dogs, mine would rather play with boxers, rotweillers, labs and german shepards than anything her size. This is something you have to watch because while they are chasing everything is good but if it turns into a wrestling/nipping match they don't back down and could easily get hurt by a larger dog that is just playing.

Again, my long winded .02 based on a couple pups
 
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