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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi. just wondering if people have had this problem before. My 1 year beagle pup is very nervous around alot of things, like noise, traffic, hussle and bussle, and new objects. He was never misstreated before and has a lovelly personallity apart from his nervousness so wondered if this is common in beagles?

thanks
 

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How long have you had your pup? Do you know his background?
 

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I know they say dogs will go through a stage when they're young where they get easily startled. But at 1 years old he should be beyond that. Bodie is 5 months old and he too should be beyond that stage. But he still gets startled during walks or being in an unfamiliar setting. It can be as benign as a piece of paper blowing by or a trash can in the street. I think he's used to the sounds, no matter how loud, around the house. Although, he still doesn't like the leaf blower.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
he was raised in a kennels and we had him from about 3-4 months. He's been puppy classes and is fairly well trained for a beagle lol. He just seems always to be 'on edge' when we are out unless he's in a field away from all distractions. I take it beagle are normally more 'confident' than my little man then?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Originally Posted By: Brien & Bodie
I know they say dogs will go through a stage when they're young where they get easily startled. But at 1 years old he should be beyond that. Bodie is 5 months old and he too should be beyond that stage. But he still gets startled during walks or being in an unfamiliar setting. It can be as benign as a piece of paper blowing by or a trash can in the street. I think he's used to the sounds, no matter how loud, around the house. Although, he still doesn't like the leaf blower.
when we first got him he simply refused to go out on walks. I had to either carry him or drive somewhere quiet away from distractions. He also doesn't travel well, is sick in minutes if that is normal.
Excuse all the questions straight away but I've only just fund this place so chatting with other beagle owners is quite novel :)
 

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You will have to take him out little and often. Make it fun from the start, just getting out of the front door at first than give lots of praise and some favorite treats. Just go half a block or so at first but plenty of happy voices, praise and treats. He should soon become accustomed to his walks fairly quickly. Dont push him if he really does not want to do it or make a fuss if he gets upset as this will reinforce his behaviour.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Originally Posted By: barking madYou will have to take him out little and often. Make it fun from the start, just getting out of the front door at first than give lots of praise and some favorite treats. Just go half a block or so at first but plenty of happy voices, praise and treats. He should soon become accustomed to his walks fairly quickly. Dont push him if he really does not want to do it or make a fuss if he gets upset as this will reinforce his behaviour.
sorry, i think my posts have been a little confusing. What you have said is actually what we did to get him going for walks when he hated going out. He now loves getting the 'walkies' call and loves going out but just gets scared so easily so was wondering if this is normal. The main reason I asked this really was because what has happened in the last couple of days which I'll explain. I live next to some farmers fields and he loves being let off the lead their. it has a public footpath which actually goes under the M1 motorway (which if you aren't british is one of the biggest roads in the UK) and he isn't bothered but the farmer put some high tech metallic 'scarecrows' and they really have changed his opinion of walking there. It just seems to be small things like this that always put his back up.
 

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Our dogs have been with us since they were pups. I have always been careful to socialize them and to expose them to a lot of different things from a young age. I have one of the 3 that does seem to be quite timid at times. I have no idea why. He also has never been abused and did not come from a place that he lacked socialization so I can't explain it.

As for car sickness...some dogs have it and some don't. I do not have any with the problem.
 

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Java's very brave when it comes to meeting new people and animals, but he too has some fear of random objects (normally larger than he is, e.g. doggie gates). I've always attributed this to his individual quirks. I'm sure there's some deep psychological explanation for it. But then again, the same can be said about us humans being afraid of the dark or of heights.

One way is to not be compelled to pet him to calm him when he's afraid. That's our natural instinct as humans, but you may be inadvertently telling him it's ok to be afraid in that situation. I think the trick is to try show your furry pal that you're calm and whatever that is scaring him/her is not really that bad. Consistency is your friend. (Of course, all that advice is completely easier said than done--at least for me
)
 

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This may sound a tad silly, but I am sure one of my trio does not see as well as her roommates. Things that do not bother the other two frighten her, plastic bags, unusual shapes put out for trash, the wind suddenly blowing a large branch close to the ground. You get the idea. Sometimes I really wish they could talk to me.
 

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We have four beagles, all rescues and all adopted as pretty much adults (ages 7 months to 3 1/2 years when we adopted them). Our first two are the typical self-confident, afraid of almost nothing type of beagles - their tails are ALWAYS flying high when they are out and about. The last two are both scaredy-dogs... especially our third, Popcorn. Even three years after adopting her she remains terrorized of pretty much everything in the world outside our apartment, and her tail is rarely, if ever, up in the air when she is outside. If something scares her she basically loses it and cannot really function for a bit until she gets her composure back. In contrast, our most recent adoptee, Buzz, started out a lot like Popcorn but in the two months we have now had him has made amazing gains in confidence to the point now where his tail is often flying high with the other two.

So I don't think there is a normal in this regard - we don't know a lot about the Popcorn's background but I can't imagine it was any worse than, for example, our second beagle Moose's life before we adopted him (he had an electrical cord tied too tight around his neck and a cigarette burn on his head when the rescue found him and, we learned later, had been shot at some point and the pellet left in his flank...) - yet he is such a confident and self-assured little guy.
 

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Daisy is almost 13 months, and she is still quite fearful. It started when she was 8 months or so. It has gotten better, but I've been working with her.
 

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Just have to keep working on it. Helping a dog gain confidence can take a long time and good handling techniques. Henry came to me as a very sweet dog but was nervous. It took a lot of work to get him where he is now, confident and self-assured.
 

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Originally Posted By: Brien & Bodie
I know they say dogs will go through a stage when they're young where they get easily startled. But at 1 years old he should be beyond that.
Dogs go through two fear periods, the first one is from 12-16 weeks and the second one is generally from 8-16 months.

If the OP didn't get the pup till he was 3-4 months old, and he was kenneled up until then, there is a chance he missed his most important socialisation period from 6-12 weeks of age.

It has hard to work with a dog that is under socialised but its not impossible - you want to teach him that each experience he has, holds a value - at the moment a lot of things (noises, smells etc) would have a negative value - so you want to boost his confidence.
 

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My JoJO is all confidence when her big sister Jesie is about but when Jesie isn't there she is very nervous. I've started walking them seperately at least twice a week to get JoJo's confidence up which has helped. The other thing I do is when we are walking either all together or just one at a time if JoJo see's another dog or human and she makes any sort of contact I praise her and also reward her with a treat. I've been doing this for about 2 months and she has really really improved. Now she will even initialise first contact! We aren't completely there yet but we are definately getting there. Patience is the key (if it isn't a dog I have none! hehe).
 

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I agree with Smeagle. It sounds like as he was kennelled before you got him then chances are he missed that vital period between 6-12 weeks when socialization and good experiences are crucial.

Things like the scarecrow are new to him and would probably make most dogs a little aprehensive if they had never seen one before. A well adjusted dog though would quickly get used to it. Next time you take him there take some very tasty treats that are better than what you normally give him. Make it all fun and exciting and walk past the scarecrow with him, getting closer each time, but distract him from it by giving him a command like heel then treat/praise. Repeating this over and over again will give him positive thoughts about the scarecrow.

My first dog Lilly used to be scared of a brick wall that was built right in the middle of a field (don't ask me why lol). After weeks of walking her past it but not too close and talking to her all the time in a happy voice I eventaully managed to incorporate the brick wall into a game where I would hide behind it then call her. When she found me I would run round and round the wall with her chasing me. Voila, fear gone.

You can apply this kind of approach to almost any fearful situation and turn it into something positive.

Good luck
 

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Snoopy's eyes are not as good as Susi's and he'll sometimes bark madly and back off, when out on walks. We can usually work out what object he is scared of and I'll walk up to that object whilst Dave waits with the dogs. When Snoopy sees we are not afraid he relaxes and walks past the object.
I am surprised you walk your beagle off the lead, it is very rare that a beagle can be trusted 100% not to take off after a scent. Maybe if you walked him on the lead, he would feel safer. Try walking past the scarecrow with him on the lead and try to make it the most normal thing in the world. He'll sense it if you are nervous.
 
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