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Hello there! I'm Mrs. Nix, and I live in Okinawa, Japan with my husband and my four year-old daughter. I tend to be long-winded in places like this. I apologize for that in advance. Some people like that...others hate my famous "walls of text." I'm just so appreciative to find this community to talk to. I really hope that someday, I can add something positive and helpful.

So...here goes:

We just brought our new beagle princess home four days ago. She is a 7 month-old tri-color JKC registered Beagle, and we have named her Kioko (which means "greets the world with happiness"). We bought her from a woman who was recommended to us by friends.

In the U.S.A., I would never have gone to a "registered puppy sales" place, but this shop has a good reputation here on Okinawa. Things are very different here, and it seems that people don't typically buy straight from the breeder like we do at home. My eyebrow went up after meeting my Kioko for the first time when I realized that she was so old to still not have a home...AND she had an engorged tick behind one of her ears. I grew up on a farm so I'm familiar with ticks, and it takes DAYS for a tick to get that large on a dog. This indicated a lack of care to me, but the handler with the pups acted shocked and embarrassed, and after handling several other pups, I found no other ticks. They seemed clean, playful, and well-fed. Based on that, like an idiot, I wrote it off as an isolated mistake on their part. Like I said--this place came highly recommended. I thought I was dealing with reputable people. Plus...you all know what it's like when you meet your beagle baby for the first time...you're just in love and it's all over. I'm fully willing to admit that I was a bit overcome with that puppy smell and the lovely personality I found in Kioko. Perhaps that dulled my judgment.

I have, in the last 48 hours, discovered that I was duped. I fear...and this makes me sick...that our darling came from a horrible place. I have researched and studied for so long to determine what breed was best for our little family. We were so careful for so long to wait until we had the right choice made and the right home situation to raise a dog. I have always preached (as a former kitty cat mommy to several long-loved feline angels who are--as Dylan Thomas wrote--no longer whinnying with us) against pet stores and puppy mills. Now, I really believe I've gone and made a tragic mistake. Little Kioko Lily has several illnesses and problems that were invisible to us two weeks ago when we first met and selected her. Now, there seems to be some problem with her papers, as well. Due to all this, I can only conclude that she came from a puppy mill type of outfit somewhere here in Japan.

I can’t undo this, now, so my focus is getting Kioko better. She is going to be alright. We have a wonderful and supportive, ethical veterinary staff. They are just a miracle, and they have helped us get Kioko the health care she needs.

So. We have her at home, now. Both my husband and I have spent several years selecting the breed and trying to understand what will be required of us to be good beagle parents. So far, she has been a perfect beagle. That is to say...she follows that nose wherever it leads her, and she's stubborn as a proverbial mule! Oh, but she's so affectionate and playful and loving--a real snuggler--and she's fantastic with my daughter. She is really surprising us with how uncharacteristically “lap dog”-ish she is. We didn’t expect that from a beagle, and we’re prepared for it emotionally if she becomes a bit more houndishly aloof once she is no longer sick.

All that said, I am a new puppy owner. Kioko is our first dog as grown-ups. My childhood furry companion was an English Setter named Sugar whom my parents bought when I was 5 years old. She was a magnificent quail dog for my parents, and she was my companion in life until she died at the age of 13 years...shortly after I graduated from high school. My husband grew up with a terrier mix named Zach. Zach died only last year. So...we know and love dogs, but we've never raised one before.

Now, we are raising a headstrong beagle...and she's ill to boot. I figured the best thing I could do to aid myself in helping Kioko become the best beagle she can be was to find a group of people who know and love their own beagles. So here I am.

I hope you all don't mind questions. I am pretty sure I'll have a lot of them in the coming weeks. If any of you have suggestions or advice, I'll be happy to read it and very appreciative of your time and interest.

Here's what we're doing:

1.) We have her spay scheduled for the end of next month. I am praying that her first heat will not come before then. She needs to get well before the surgery...which is the reason we're waiting so long to have it done.

2.) She is on a week-long course of antibiotics for a nasty urinary tract infection, and she is scheduled out for getting her vaccinations updated--including, among others, a corona, parvo, distemper, and rabies. She's clean for heartworm, and we've gotten her on the appropriate heartworm preventatives and flea/tick treatment.

3.) She is successfully crate-ing for us. No accidents of any kind in her crate since the antibiotic started, and she voluntarily goes into it throughout the day. We close her in it at night and when we leave the home (which is never more than 2 hours or so at a time). We have her crate in the living room with all of us during the day and in our bedroom next to our bed at night. It's working very well. No separation anxiety so far, and no crate accidents. So the crate thing is fine.

4.) We are taking her outside at LEAST once per hour during all of her waking hours (the poor thing has to piddle constantly because of the infection)...to the same spot. She is also walked twice daily around the block. She loves that, and the vet said there was no need to closet her in the house...just to keep her from close contact with other dogs until she's well and totally vaccinated.

5.) She is fed twice per day, with a training session that involves food treats as reward in the midday between meals. She is making good eye contact with me when I call her name, and she's learning "sit," but you can tell she thinks it's beneath her dignity.

6.) She has been bathed. She took it like a man. HA HA HA.

7.) We’ve brushed her teeth (which she resists but is warming to because the toothpaste tastes like chicken), and brushed her all over, including paws (which she does NOT resist) every night before night-nights, and I‘m already seeing that this night time routine calms her down and prepares her for sleep. When we’re done brushing, she gathers up all her toys and takes them to her crate and then goes to lie down in the middle of her blanket with all of them. It’s the most adorable thing I’ve ever seen.

8.) We’ve signed up for basic obedience classes, and the school will call me with my options for start dates on that very soon.

Okay…that’s it. I told you I was long-winded. Hehe. Anyway…thanks so much for being here. I hope to get to know some of you and contribute to the community. I will be posting Kioko pictures very soon.

Good day to everyone,
Mrs. Nix
 

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Welcome to Beagle World! You will make a great Beagle owner. You have done your homework and seem to have all the "bad bases" covered. Hopefully now you will get to enjoy the pure joy of being owned by a loving Beagle. I would say the best thing you are doing is getting her healthy. She will love you for making her feel better. Sounds like she already is! Just as an aside, and this is really, really going to date me, but I used to live on Okinawa, but it was over 50 years ago! I know I would not recognize it today. There are lots of new puppy owners that will have tons of good advice for you. My pups are all rescues. You will hear this from everyone, pictures please, we love pictures.
 

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Kioko, what perfect name for a beagle. A dog doesn't ask to be in a pet store and frankly, all dogs deserve better but fortunately it sounds like Kioko has lucked out. Beagles are hearty critters and I'm sure she will recover in short order. Beagles were bred to be independant thinkers which means training requires a different approach than say a herd dog. Beagles were also bred to be pack oriented and since you are now Kioko's pack, she will want to please the pack. You can use that to your advantage when training. Beagles do not respond to negative training, praise (and treats) when they do what you want works, punishment when they don't is counter productive. Kioko needs to be socialized and it would do both you and her a lot of good to go to a basic obedience class. The great thing about beagles is they are forever young, merry and retain all the loveable traits of a puppy for their lives BUT all the unwanted puppy traits like chewing tend to fade as tehy grow up. I am sure Kioko will reward you in time but the key word to traing a beagle is patience. Looking forward to learning more about Kioko.
 

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I love her name and can't wait to see pictures. I am sorry to hear that her first weeks with you have been filled with illness. I am sure she will be feeling a lot better soon. Welcome to Beagle World.
 

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Wow... that's quite a story there. I personally think that Kioko ( :heart: the name) couldn't have found a better home than with your family. I think that a lot of parents don't do their homework the way you did yours with the pup.

I think she will be very happy with you and you will enjoy every minute of having her with you.

Waiting for those pictures.
 

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Welcome to Beagle World. :wave: I'm so sorry that you had a bad experience with the shop, but so glad that sweet Kioko was rescued by you. You're doing so many good things for her.

My husband was career USMC, and was stationed on Okinawa twice. I never spent any time there. He could have had another tour there during which the kids and I would have been able to accompany him. However, he'd already been told that the other option was Hawaii so we went there.

We do love pictures so will anxiously await the first ones of Kioko. As for being long-winded, if you ask me what time it is, I very possibly will launch into a lesson on how to build a clock. /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/laugh.gif
 

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Welcome to BW! I firmly believe that things work out the way they are supposed to and Kioko was destined to be part of your family -- just imagine what might have happened to her if you had not come along when you did. Like others have said, eagerly awaiting pics!
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
PICTURES!



This one is Kioko longing to run out in the middle of the street to chase and lick some kids skating by. The feet belong to me!




hee hee. My sweet little lap beagle near bedtime.



My daughter and Kioko hamming it up for the camera.




Kioko just before night nights in her crate with all her toys.
 

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Welcome! That is a beautiful name. Kioko and your daughter are beautiful also. My Maggie was also probably a puppy mill dog and she is doing great despite some early illness.
 

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Welcome! Kioko is absolutely beautiful!! I'm so sorry to hear about her illness, but it sounds like she is very fortunate to have such a caring and loving "Mother". Hope she feels better soon!
 

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こんにちはそして歓迎。
Welcome to the BW pack!

I have always believed that every dog deserves a good home (puppy mill or not). At 7 months, I would consider Kioko a more of a rescue. Our Summer is a cuddler too, so its not uncommon. That may never change, neither will the stubborn.

Anyway, I have always said that once you adopt/rescue a dog, its previous history is gone. Their new history starts now. It sounds like her first chapter is starting out nicely.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Thank you for the nice welcome, Everyone. I'm feeling so lost and ill-equipped. I love this dog, and so does my husband. We've waited so long for her, and we're feeling completely out of our depth. Difficult housetraining...we can do. But this is impossible housetraining.

Today is the end of day 5 for us, and her housebreaking is actually completely derailing. We thought we were making progress...but it's gotten so much worse in just 24 hours. I hope it was just a bad day. /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/smile.gif I'm running out of ideas, and no matter how much time we spend outside, how brightly we praise her, how vigilant we are about taking her after sleep, meals, and playtime...she is eliminating outside less and inside more. We spent a collective 10 hours outside today, but she only went poop outside once in the morning and pee once in the evening (after a solid hour and a half of sitting and waiting for her to go). EVERY time we go inside, she will squat to go within 5 minutes...and it's not just urine anymore. She pooped inside today for the first time--twice.

I have no idea why it's all derailing so badly, and I don't know what we're doing wrong for her. I had to clean her crate 4 times today because she peed in it each time I placed her inside it today...which were so that I could clean up messes she made on the floor after coming in from outside potty time...that she refused to go potty during.

I got her down to sleep on her 5th set of clean bedding for today, and we're getting ready to go to sleep. I'm getting very close to crying and despairing. I can handle a slow training process. I can handle some piddle and poops. What I can't handle is having NO IDEA what to do, now...and becoming fearful of letting her out of the crate inside. I will NOT lock a dog in a kennel and leave her there, but she eliminated in her crate or on the floor more than 6 times today, even though I was right there to stop her and take her out each time. NONE of these times, did she finish her business outside...even though I sat out there for a full half hour each time before coming in with her.

My poor daughter can see that I'm stressed, so I know that Kioko has to be picking up on it by now.

I don't know how to help her, but conventional crate training method isn't working. AT. ALL.

Please wish me luck.
 

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Hi and welcome to BW!

Kioko and your daughter are beautiful!! congrats!

I don't know how to help you with the potty training as I didn't really have that problem with Glover, who is now 5 months going on teenage years...

but Im sure there are people here that can!

x
K
 

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I can read the distress in your post. I'm afraid that I can't offer help in the potty training area as it's been a long time since I had to do that.

All I can advise is patience. Kioko is in a new environment, and she's not feeling well. The antibiotics probably aren't helping as far as house training goes. It could be that they're upsetting her system. Do you have a small room such as a bath or utility room where you could confine Kioko with a baby gate and perhaps cover the floor with papers? That way she wouldn't be confined to her crate and, until things improve, it would make cleanup easier.

She will potty outside, and when she does praise her like it's the greatest thing that ever happened. Good luck, and keep us posted.
 

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Oh my, I can relate!!!
I had the most horrible times trying to potty train Chloe. I had it bad, as I am at work all day and she is not crated!! (have you ever heard a bealge cry/bark/howl/distressed? when I got a call from the building management and had to get home in the middle of a day's work, that was her last time locked up).

Kioko will get the hang of it. Usually what happens is that they get worse and worse, and then get better, then get worse all over again. One day (soon!!) you will see that in a miraculous way she will suddenly be potty trained.

Keep on with the positive reinforcements and unless you catch her in the act, no "bad dog" or scolding. Beagles don't react very well to that. It takes a LOT of patience with them, but they are smart, and when they realize the negotiation is not in their favor, they WILL give up.

Keep strong!
 

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House training a beagle puppy can be very challenging. Since she is having some physical problems, and is on antibiotics, this can affect her.
Here's an article from my beagle group on "House Training" - hope it's helpful. She's a beautiful girl - and I'm so sorry she's had so many problems.


House Training a Puppy

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The quickest and easiest way to house train your puppy is to rely on your puppy's natural instincts and behavior.


What To Expect During the House Training Process
Unless you can monitor your puppy 24 hours a day, don't expect the house training process to be completed until your puppy is at least 6 months old. It's normal for a young puppy to be a little 'input-output' machine. Since puppies are growing and developing rapidly at this stage, they eat more food, burn up more energy and seem to need to eliminate constantly! They also have not yet developed bowel and bladder control, so they can't 'hold it' as long as adult dogs.

House Training When You Are Not Home
Confine your puppy to a small, 'puppy-proofed' room and paper the entire floor. Put his bed, toys and food/water bowls there. At first there will be no rhyme or reason to where your pup eliminates. He will go every where and any where. He will also probably play with the papers, chew on them, and drag them around his little den. Most puppies do this and you just have to live with it. Don't get upset, just accept it as life with a young puppy. The important thing is that when you get home, clean up the mess and lay down fresh papers.

Passive House Training or Paper Training
While your puppy is confined, he is developing a habit of eliminating on paper because no matter where he goes, it will be on paper. As time goes on, he will start to show a preferred place to do his business. When this place is well established and the rest of the papers remain clean all day, then gradually reduce the area that is papered. Start removing the paper that is furthest away from his chosen location. Eventually you will only need to leave a few sheets down in that area only. If he ever misses the paper, then you've reduced the area too soon. Go back to papering a larger area or even the entire room. Once your puppy is reliably going only on the papers you've left, then you can slowly and gradually move his papers to a location of your choice. Move the papers only an inch a day. If puppy misses the paper again, then you're moving too fast. Go back a few steps and start over. Don't be discouraged if your puppy seems to be making remarkable progress and then suddenly you have to return to papering the entire room. This is normal. There will always be minor set-backs. If you stick with this procedure, your puppy will be paper trained.

House Training When You Are Home
When you are home but can't attend to your puppy, follow the same procedures described above. However, the more time you spend with your puppy, the quicker he will be house trained. Your objective is to take your puppy to his toilet area every time he needs to eliminate. This should be about once every 45 minutes; just after a play session; just after eating or drinking; and just upon waking. When he does eliminate in his toilet area, praise and reward him profusely and enthusiastically! Don't use any type of reprimand or punishment for mistakes or accidents. Your puppy is too young to understand and it can set the house training process back drastically. Don't allow your puppy freedom outside of his room unless you know absolutely for sure that his bladder and bowels are completely empty. When you do let him out, don't let him out of your sight. It is a good idea to have him on leash when he is exploring your home. He can't get into trouble if you are attached to the other end of the leash. Every 30 minutes return your pup to his toilet area. As your puppy becomes more reliable about using his toilet area and his bowel and bladder control develops, he can begin to spend more time outside his room with you in the rest of your home. Begin by giving him access to one room at a time. Let him eat, sleep and play in this room but only when he can be supervised. When you cannot supervise him, put him back in his room.

Active House Training
The most important thing you can do to make house training happen as quickly as possible is to reward and praise your puppy every time he goes in the right place. The more times he is rewarded, the quicker he will learn. Therefore it's important that you spend as much time as possible with your pup and give him regular and frequent access to his toilet area.

Key to Successful House Training
Consistancy and Patience. Never scold or punish your puppy for mistakes and accidents. The older your pup gets, the more he will be able to control his bladder and bowels. Eventually your pup will have enough control that he will be able to "hold it" for longer and longer periods of time. Let your puppy do this on his own time. When training is rushed, problems usually develop. Don't forget, most puppies are not reliably house trained until they are at least 6 months old

http://www.perfectpaws.com/index.html
 

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Welcome to BW! Kioko is gorgeous and I just love her name. It sounds like she has been through a lot in her short lift, but you sound like you've got everything under control.

As for housebreaking. I went through the same thing with Jersey. She had a lot of problems housebreaking. I started to bring treats out with me and gave her something yummy immediately after she finished going potty. I didn't wait until we came in so that she associated the treats with going potty and not coming inside. It took a while, but one day it just clicked in her head and she went to the door wanted to go out. Like Sandy said, just be patient. It may take some time, but it will happen.

I do wonder if the amount of time she spent in the pet shop is hurting her crate training. If she got used to releaving herself in the same area she was living in, it could take a little longer for her to adjust. Just an idea.

Good luck and again, welcome to the boards!
 

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I would guess that some of your housebreaking problem is you rescued her when she was 7 months old. The poor thing had probably just been sitting in her cage with no "guidance" about what was proper (don't piddle and poop in the house) and what was not. So you get to literally start from scratch with a pup that has been doing "whatever" for many months. The only advice I can offer is what you have already received. Be consistent, on top of it as much as you can, and praise, praise for even the littlest bit of progress. One of the best pieces of advice I have ever read is to hook the pup to you waist or belt, and where you go, it goes. It is never out of your sight and you will quickly learn the "I am about to squat and piddle/poop" signs. A quick no, no and out they go! I fostered a little 18 mo. old girl last month for 3 weeks, and while she was housetrained - thank my lucky stars - no one had ever trained her as far as what was allowed and what was a positive no way Jose! She was a little doll and there was tons of things to love about her, but she needed some serious manners. It was sort of the samething you are up against. An older dog that has no idea of what is ok and what is a no-no. Hang on there, judging from everything else, she is more than well worth it. You may grind your teeth down a bit, but one of these days you will say "OMG, I think she got it"!!!!
 
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