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Hello everyone,

we've been thinking to get a dog for a while now. It didn't really fit with our day to day routine(baby, rental home, full time jobs, lots of travelling etc) but last year we finally made the decision to go for it. Our daughter is now 7, we have our own home with a good size garden and there's always somebody around the house since after corona I'm working from home almost full-time and my wife only works two full days a week. So our search began for the breed. After A LOT of research we narrowed it down to a male (in order of preference) Beagle, English Cocker Spaniel or a Whippet. Next challenge was to find a good pup. Not an easy job here in Belgium. Anyway we got on several waiting lists and finally the news came that a beagle puppy was avaible. This is a dog with pedigree, a full breed Beagle.

And now we are having second thoughts about the Beagle :( We start focussing on all the negative news we hear and read. Very hard to handle, cannot be left alone, you cannot take them with you anywhere because they bark all the time or try to run away (eg. restaurant, drink in an outside bar,...), they cannot be left alone or they brake down the house, they cannot be left in the garden or they start digging like rabbits, they are hard to walk, they cannot ever walk without a leash (eg. beach, dog pen,...).

For sure we would take him to puppy training.

Now on top of that we have the choice between a male and a bitch. I was 100% sure about the male, but now I also hear the the bitches are easier to handle?

I'm sorry for the rant, my mind is a mess right now :(

Please Beagle owners, calm down my mind :)
 

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Very good that you are considering all the variables and issues before committing to a dog.. First I would read up on puppies since the first year can be a challenge.
Have you had a dog before?
Things to consider...
1. Beagles are a little slow in potty training but with concentration on this they get it.
2. Have a yard with a fence since beagles are NOT off leash dogs..they will run away given the chance.
3. They need good training and the whole family's involvement.
4. Have a place in your house to keep the dog until they get over the mischief phase.
5. All puppies ho through a biting stage at about 3 months and lasts a few months. This is not aggression..its just what they do..so very important to read up on working through that..if you get a puppy ill be happy to post suggestions..
7. Any dog is an expense for food and vet care.

I got my beagle at 8wks old and she is now 10.7 years old...
Cassie says Hi
Dog Comfort Tartan Dog breed Carnivore
 

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Thank you for researching and thinking hard about the dog you get! It will make your journey easier.

If you get a beagle as a pup and take him/her for training, things will go more smoothly for you. I had a beagle named Benny that I got as a pup and he was wonderful! He loved to go in the car, camping, visiting friends, staying in hotels etc. He could be alone at home with our cat but we would have someone stop by if we were gone long. Yes, it isn't a good idea to let them off leash unless they receive serious recall training.
 

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You sound like you have done your research! Thank you for that!
Any dog is a full-time commitment - it's having a child who stays at age 2.
Beagles can have separation anxiety as they are bred to hunt in packs they always want to be surrounded by their pack, so if you decide on a beagle, make sure you have plans to inlcude it on activities. They're an active breed, like any dog, left to their own devices, they can be destructive. Ally chewed a chair rung and the corner of the baseboard but my husband left her alone in the kitchen as a puppy while he was in the basement for a bit. No destruction after that; except she loved ripping the stuffing out of toys (she never tried to eat it).
Crate training helps with taking them places, any fears (storms, loud noises) and potty training. They can be trained not to bark excessively, Ally hardly ever barked unless someone was at the door (she was not left unattended outside). We took her on trips, she was quiet and well behaved (a good case for crate training as well). She sat at outdoor restaurants with us, just keep on a leash tethered to you - I just wrapped Ally's around my ankle - we took kibble and she had her dinner but of course she still begged and of course it worked, lol.
Ally like to dig when she was a puppy, but it was just a stage for her. I put her to work digging holes for my annuals (no kidding). She enjoyed digging in the sand at the beach, but was not a chronic digger in the garden. She did not like water (lakes, ocean etc).
Puppy training is the best thing you can do - it is good for socialization and to learn limits. Food motivation helps with training but also adds calories, so have to adjust for that. They do not respond well to punishment, only positive correction and redirection. Punishment will lead to a fearful beagle.
I've only had females, so I can't comment on gender.
Personally, I've had a jack russell terrier mix, 2 poodles, a lab/beagle mix and a purebred beagle. My beagle was easier than all of them - it's all about how you train them and their personalities. My beagle was my heart dog. I'm in between beagles right now.
Looking at your other two choices of breeds, all will be of the same energy and exercise needs and prone to separation anxiety. With a young child, have you read up on spaniel rage? Temperament is a genetic trait.
 
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