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Hey guys it's been awhile since I last posted about our boy Chase and may be the last time. :-(

My husband is fed up with him. He's 4 months and we've had him since he was 7 wks and he still doesn't get anything we've taught him. He won't "sit" "stay" "lay" or anything anymore. He's tearing up the house we're living in (Military housing) and he's not potty trained at all. I'm very skilled when it comes to training dogs and none of my or your methods has helped us.

Yes, these are all things that get on all of our nerves but at times I feel like I'm the only one trying to get him trained and it's a lot of work for just me especially when I have other problems and needs within my home. My husband wants to sale him... Then just now he said he's going to just bring him to a shelter. I hate the feeling of giving up. Because even though everyone has completely given up on him I haven't. I get a little discouraged too with Chase and I may say things out of frustration but I don't want to give up my little puppy I love him. He's one of the family members. How can I trust he'll be going to a good home?

It hurts to possibly have to say goodbye to the little guy and I think he knows because he's been in his kennel all day off and on just staying out of the way. And that just hurts my heart.

I mean I have ran out of ideas. I can't take him to any training classes because that cost money I do not have. I know some people may say that giving him up may be the best thing but trust me when I say he's with a loving family my husband is just very frustrated with him using the potty everywhere and tearing up the house that we will have to pay for repairs. Any advice is greatly appreciated. Thanks!
 

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How old is he?

The way I look at it is...you just don't "give up" on something you love. But if you've exhausted all possible venues with training him to know avail and you can't give him the home he needs do the very best you can to find him a great forever family.

If you're going to owner surrender him look for a beagle rescue to take him. Do not just go dropping him off at the closet shelter...he deserves at least that.

Puppies are HARD, but NOT unmanageable. I speak from experience. Although training Abby was difficult and frustrating I did not give up. There were times that Béla and I fought tooth and nail about her (him wanting to "get rid of her" because of puppy accidents or her scratching the windowsills or what not) as well as her training. I did not back down, we pressed on, overcame and made it through her "puppy" days.

I'm so happy I didn't give up and/or didn't let him give her away. She is an amazing dog, very loyal and loving and not puppy wild anymore.

Babies are hard too but never would I dream of giving up my kids...and that's what I feel like Abby is...she's just "one of the gang"

Everyone on this board has struggled with their beags at one time or another.

"Without ambition one starts nothing. Without work one finishes nothing. The prize will not be sent to you. You have to win it." Ralph Waldo Emerson
 

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He is only 4 months old. I can't tell you what you should do, but can tell you that I wouldn't give up on him.

Chloe was a nightmare!!! when she was younger and she is not even a year old. I have an antique chair without the stuffing, a chewed up legs of the sofa/futon, a chewed up passport, and she is still not 100% potty trained. When I'm with her in the house she is fine, but if I'm at work it just seems like she wouldn't bother holding it. I still come home everyday to a little puddle of pee by the door (which makes me think she gets a little stressed when I'm gone and just can't control it) and she has her "fit" episodes... I would never consider giving her up because of that...

The key is patience. What if you have him in the crate all day and when taking him out of the crate, leashing him to you? Just don't let him out of your sight. It shouldn't take much longer, with many puppies it's almost instantaneous, one day the are just potty trained.

If you do decide to give him up, please find him a good home or give him to a beagle rescue. They will know how to place him appropriately.

Be strong!
 

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At four months, Chase is still a baby. If he can be given more time, things will undoubtedly get better.

When we were in the military and lived on base, special services offered a variety of classes, etc. Is it possible there might be inexpensive training classes offered through them?

Please do not take him to a shelter. If you don't know of someone who'd give him a good home, try to find a beagle rescue. They'd be able to work with him and, as Eleanor said, know how to place him.
 

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I have not raised a Beagle yet, so I can not speak from experience. I do know that Keegan, the Cocker, was a real pistol to train as a puppy. From the age of about 4 to 8 or so months she was bent on "not listening" and having "selective hearing."

I just worked harder with her and I did not give up. Instead of walking her for a half mile every day, I made it a whole mile. I carried treats with me everywhere. I kept her on a leash that was around my belt loop. I did not let her out of my sight!

Don't give up on this poor baby. But if you have seriously sat down with your husband and listened to his concerns and made a game plan and it hasn't worked, the least you can do for this poor little fellow is take him to a Beagle Rescue. Please don't take him to the shelter, you have no idea who will adopt him there. At least a new owner will be screened by the Rescue agency.

Whatever you decide, good luck with the pup.
 

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If I was closer to you, I would offer to foster him until a proper home was found. Thispoor little guy deserves more than to be dumped at a shelter. I'm sorry but dogs should not be disposable. Puppies are a lot of work, and are non-stop work but it is all worth it. I really hope that if you deo decide this is your only option, that you at least find a good home for him, a home that will be for life.
 

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look I went through the same thing just a few weeks ago. My other half wanted to get rid of Glover, he was driving us mad! more so than normal lol

But with alot of help from these guys here at BW and alot of patient thinking! He seems to be getting better.

Glover is only 5 months, and as much as he does bad things, the good over weighs them.

Please don't give up!!! have you sat down with your husband and worked on a routine, plan that you both follow religiously?

This is what we did and truly, it works. He's only a baby and I know you know that, but your husband needs to understand that too.

Like the others said though, if you do decide to give him up, make sure its a good home, not a shelter. What ever Chase has done, he doesn't deserve a shelter.

xx
K
 

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The members on this forum know to what lengths I have gone to for my Maggie so I will not get started on how I feel about your decision. Instead, I have done an on-line search for you to find beagle rescues in Missouri. Here is a list of rescues and their phone numbers. Before you just dispose of your pet, at least take the time to be a responsible human being and call each of these rescues to find a humane place to take Chase:
1) Basset and Beagle Rescue of the Heartland - 800/332-9416;
2) Furry Kids Refuge - 816/699-3238;
3) Heart of America Humane Society - 800/384-3143;
4) Foxwood Animal Rescue - 816/665-2339;
5) Excelsior Springs Friends of Animals - 816/898-6649;
6) Friends of the Friendless Animal Rescue Group - 816/200-9571.
Another option (unless you got Chase from a pet store) is to call whomever you got Chase from and ask them to take him back so they could find him a good home. Do not do this if you got him from a pet store!
 

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Have to agree with the majority here. Chase is a PUPPY - I'd never had a beagle until I got Princess for my granddaughter. EVERY dog I'd ever had as an adult (Collie shepherd, Sheltie, and Keeshond) had been TOTALLY potty trained by 3 months. Beagles are NOT like other dogs - I know a few beagle owners whose pups were trained by 3 or 4 months, but they are in the minority. I was so frustrated by Princess, she seemed to think she had a 3 story, 6000 square foot indoor potty - we had MANY discussions about that, but I didn't give up on her. She was probably 6 months old before she was fully trained. I have a friend who has two rescue beagles from shelters - the older one had soooo many issues, he'd been in 3 homes by the time he was 9 months old. He wrecked a lot of her things, too. But she was determined that Toby was in his "forever home". She took him to obedience training - then advanced obedience training - got his good citizenship award and Toby is now a certified therapy dog. He still has issues, he's afraid of stairs and won't go to the basement - probably locked in a basement at one of his "homes", he's terrified in a crate (we think he'd been crated for long periods of time). She kept asking us WHEN will he stop being a terrorist. We laughed and assured her that Tobes is a "normal" beagle - and by 1 1/2 or 2, she should be all grown up. I have holes in my upstairs hallway (BIG holes - courtesy of Sir Romeo when he was a pup), almost every piece of furniture I have has teeth marks, (remember, I have ten beagles), I've lost countless shoes (my fault for not closing closet door), remotes, cordless phones, computer cables, and most of that is MY fault.
Do you have a crate for Chase? I used to think crates were cruel - but I have crates all over my house now - there are times I can't watch the "youngsters" - none of them are frightened, they eat in their "little houses", sleep in their "little houses", and go in willingly, often just to "nap". The leash attached to your belt is also a good training tool. Keeps him within reach of you - so you can stop him if he starts to piddle.
Some of you may know (and not approve) of the fact that I am a hobby breeder. But I often talk people out of my puppies - simply because puppies take a LOT of time and effort - not everyone should have one. If you truly can't handle him, either call his breeder (if it were one of MY puppies he could come back to me - I will always take back one of my puppies) and see if she will take him - if NOT, and you still want to re-home him, by all means call a beagle rescue. You've gotten good advice here. Please try to find a solution. Babies DO grow up!!
 
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Well like I told my husband... If our son was the same way would he just give up on him? I mean I don't think what he is doing is right and I am not the one throwing in the towel and giving up on my baby. He deserves such much more than that you're all right. I asked my husband to just let me work with Chase a little longer before he just takes my puppy away.

So hopefully Chase can make him change his mind. I think he's just bluffing and i really hope so because Chase is officially a family member in my eyes. My other dog Cisco I've had him since he was 4 wks old and my God he was terrible (God bles his soul he's going to be leaving us soon. He's really old and becoming very sick) but I never once gave up on him. I am not that kind of person and like I told my husband I don't want any part of it. :-(
 

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Chase's mommy, I'm so sorry you have to make this heart wrenching decision. I completely understand your situation, and I think some have been quite harsh on you. I know you do NOT feel Chase is "disposable". You are obviously trying very hard with him, and love him very much.

I have had dogs all of my life, and Daisy, who is about 1 1/2 or 2 years old, is hands down the most challenging dog I've ever had. I adopted her in July. She is still not housebroken, tears things up, and totally ignores me when I call if there is something more interesting. There are things she KNOWS she is not supposed to do, yet does them anyway. When I see her doing whatever bad thing it is, the second she sees me, she hangs her head and crouches...so I know she knows! The only thing that works at all is to take her to doggy day camp, because it totally wears her out. But that's $20 a day, so I can only afford to do it once a week.

I have been in your shoes many times over the past 6 months. I am trying very hard, like you. Some days I have been so frustrated and stressed out about her that I have actually cried. I just want a good dog, and she's not cooperating at all /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/frown.gif

So I don't have any good advice, except that I know exactly how you feel. The love, the guilt, the stress. I feel horrible when I think about finding her a new home, but some days I just don't know if I am a beagle person.
 

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I have to laugh at "DaisyTheDevilDog" - I felt the same way when I got my first beagle - and I was over 60 years old! The funny thing is that once I accepted the fact that beagles are NOT like other dogs - and learned to love them for what they are, I totally and completely fell in love with the breed (obviously - since I have ten of the little darlings). I'm fortunate in a way - the older dogs play with the younger ones - they chase each other around the yard and wear the kids out. As my friend Deb always says, "A TIRED PUPPY IS A GOOD PUPPY". Wear them out!
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Here's an article I found on my beagle group about house training - hope it's helpful to you.
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House Training a Puppy

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The quickest and easiest way to house train your puppy is to rely on your puppy's natural instincts and behavior.


What To Expect During the House Training Process
Unless you can monitor your puppy 24 hours a day, don't expect the house training process to be completed until your puppy is at least 6 months old. It's normal for a young puppy to be a little 'input-output' machine. Since puppies are growing and developing rapidly at this stage, they eat more food, burn up more energy and seem to need to eliminate constantly! They also have not yet developed bowel and bladder control, so they can't 'hold it' as long as adult dogs.

House Training When You Are Not Home
Confine your puppy to a small, 'puppy-proofed' room and paper the entire floor. Put his bed, toys and food/water bowls there. At first there will be no rhyme or reason to where your pup eliminates. He will go every where and any where. He will also probably play with the papers, chew on them, and drag them around his little den. Most puppies do this and you just have to live with it. Don't get upset, just accept it as life with a young puppy. The important thing is that when you get home, clean up the mess and lay down fresh papers.

Passive House Training or Paper Training
While your puppy is confined, he is developing a habit of eliminating on paper because no matter where he goes, it will be on paper. As time goes on, he will start to show a preferred place to do his business. When this place is well established and the rest of the papers remain clean all day, then gradually reduce the area that is papered. Start removing the paper that is furthest away from his chosen location. Eventually you will only need to leave a few sheets down in that area only. If he ever misses the paper, then you've reduced the area too soon. Go back to papering a larger area or even the entire room. Once your puppy is reliably going only on the papers you've left, then you can slowly and gradually move his papers to a location of your choice. Move the papers only an inch a day. If puppy misses the paper again, then you're moving too fast. Go back a few steps and start over. Don't be discouraged if your puppy seems to be making remarkable progress and then suddenly you have to return to papering the entire room. This is normal. There will always be minor set-backs. If you stick with this procedure, your puppy will be paper trained.

House Training When You Are Home
When you are home but can't attend to your puppy, follow the same procedures described above. However, the more time you spend with your puppy, the quicker he will be house trained. Your objective is to take your puppy to his toilet area every time he needs to eliminate. This should be about once every 45 minutes; just after a play session; just after eating or drinking; and just upon waking. When he does eliminate in his toilet area, praise and reward him profusely and enthusiastically! Don't use any type of reprimand or punishment for mistakes or accidents. Your puppy is too young to understand and it can set the house training process back drastically. Don't allow your puppy freedom outside of his room unless you know absolutely for sure that his bladder and bowels are completely empty. When you do let him out, don't let him out of your sight. It is a good idea to have him on leash when he is exploring your home. He can't get into trouble if you are attached to the other end of the leash. Every 30 minutes return your pup to his toilet area. As your puppy becomes more reliable about using his toilet area and his bowel and bladder control develops, he can begin to spend more time outside his room with you in the rest of your home. Begin by giving him access to one room at a time. Let him eat, sleep and play in this room but only when he can be supervised. When you cannot supervise him, put him back in his room.

Active House Training
The most important thing you can do to make house training happen as quickly as possible is to reward and praise your puppy every time he goes in the right place. The more times he is rewarded, the quicker he will learn. Therefore it's important that you spend as much time as possible with your pup and give him regular and frequent access to his toilet area.

Key to Successful House Training
Consistancy and Patience. Never scold or punish your puppy for mistakes and accidents. The older your pup gets, the more he will be able to control his bladder and bowels. Eventually your pup will have enough control that he will be able to "hold it" for longer and longer periods of time. Let your puppy do this on his own time. When training is rushed, problems usually develop. Don't forget, most puppies are not reliably house trained until they are at least 6 months old

http://www.perfectpaws.com/index.html
 

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Chase's mommy, having a puppy who just turned 9 months old, I can relate to your story, and completely understand. If you search any of my posts from the summertime, you will see just how desperate I got. I mean, I was even online looking at other puppies to rescue, having decided that Marley was going in and I was coming out with a new one.

I just kept at it, is all I can say. And, still there are things we have to overcome, but boy oh boy, it's 1000 times better.

It was stressful, I did not remember how much a puppy required.

Hubby was not involved at all in the beginning so I thought I was going to just leave my house, puppy, hubby and all. No not really, but then I felt like I could have.

It got much better when hubby started helping me train, and when I saw little steps that Marley was making.

Do a quick assessment of your household.

Is now a good time for a puppy? Is everyone committed to this puppy? Are you giving him a fair shot? How often do you take Chase out to go to the bathroom? Do you use the same exact door, same words, same times? Do you walk him a lot, play with him, have training sessions? What do you do when you catch him in the act of going to the bathroom inside or tearing something up? Where is everyone when he is doing these things? Are you crating him when he cannot be watched?

There has to be a lot of attention, routine, exercise, etc. You say that you have experience so I am sure you know all of this.

Feel free to pm me, or I will give you my email. Yes, you have all of us here, but if you ever need to chat, please feel free.
 
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Quote:Originally posted by DaisyTheDevilDog:
Chase's mommy, I'm so sorry you have to make this heart wrenching decision. I completely understand your situation, and I think some have been quite harsh on you. I know you do NOT feel Chase is "disposable". You are obviously trying very hard with him, and love him very much.

I have had dogs all of my life, and Daisy, who is about 1 1/2 or 2 years old, is hands down the most challenging dog I've ever had. I adopted her in July. She is still not housebroken, tears things up, and totally ignores me when I call if there is something more interesting. There are things she KNOWS she is not supposed to do, yet does them anyway. When I see her doing whatever bad thing it is, the second she sees me, she hangs her head and crouches...so I know she knows! The only thing that works at all is to take her to doggy day camp, because it totally wears her out. But that's $20 a day, so I can only afford to do it once a week.

I have been in your shoes many times over the past 6 months. I am trying very hard, like you. Some days I have been so frustrated and stressed out about her that I have actually cried. I just want a good dog, and she's not cooperating at all /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/frown.gif

So I don't have any good advice, except that I know exactly how you feel. The love, the guilt, the stress. I feel horrible when I think about finding her a new home, but some days I just don't know if I am a beagle person.
Thanks for being so understanding. I knew once posting that everyone was going to be closed minded and NOT read anything I had to say and of course be harsh and I ignored every last one of those people. I know my heart and I know the type of person I am. I have worked for many animal shelters and I have had many dog. I also worked side by side with my great aunt who retired from being a vet.

I love Chase just like he was a family member and thats how we treat him however just like you I cry from being so stressed out. It's hard trying to care for the hardheaded pup, hardheaded son and hubby too?! Chase is a really great puppy and I know he'll catch on he just needs time and patience. Don't worry your pup will get the hang of it soon I have faith in both of our pups. Like I mentioned above I think my hubby was just talking out of anger. Good luck to you and again thanks for being a sweet heart! /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/smile.gif
 

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I take great offense to your statement that everyone was going to be close minded and harsh.

Furthermore, I do not understand
Quote:Chase is a really great puppy and I know he'll catch on he just needs time and patience. Don't worry your pup will get the hang of it soon I have faith in both of our pups.
If Chase is a really great puppy than the issue is with the humans and not the puppy. Also, if you have faith in your pup why even consider saying goodbye?

If you know what he needs, as stated in your quote, I am left to believe that you and your hubby are unable to give it to him. Again, if that is the issue than the humans are responsible, not the puppy.

It's very unfortunate that Chase may have to suffer or is suffering by having owners constantly angry with him because your family can not accept that a puppy will do puppy things. Personally, I think THAT is closed minded and harsh.
 

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I too take offense to this:

Quote:Originally posted by Chase Mommy:
Thanks for being so understanding. I knew once posting that everyone was going to be closed minded and NOT read anything I had to say and of course be harsh and I ignored every last one of those people.
Just know that any breed of dog takes time and patience. Puppies are puppies and imho, I think it varies by puppy. Some dogs just "get it" quicker than others. I know you said that it was your husband, etc., and I appreciate that you, yourself want to keep him and work with him. I don't think that anyone was trying to be close minded or harsh to you. I think that everyone is concerned for the well-being of the puppy.

Just take a deep breath and talk calmly with your husband. Explain to him rationally what you plan on doing to help with the training etc. Crate training and keeping him on a leash when he isn't crated are 2 very good ways of keeping your floors clean. A tired puppy is a good puppy. Remember these things and it should all work itself out in due time.

Good luck to you.

ETA: I know what you went through, from a different experience. I don't really have anything to add except that I just hope everything works out okay for you.
 

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I can sympathize with you. Jersey was a horrible puppy. She didn't want to housebreak, she chewed everything, not to mention the complaints from my neighbors about her barking. I can't tell you how many tears I shed over her those first few months. I had quite a few moments when I thought I'd have to return her to the rescue. I'd be crying my eyes out and Mike would talk me down. Like he kept telling me, we took on the responsibility of a dog, and we owed it to Jersey to follow through. We got through it all and now have one awesome dog. Sure, she still has her mischeivious moments, but nothing more than we can handle. She still has separation anxiety and will cry her head off if we leave her alone, so we just don't. We do doggy day care and my aunt helps watch her too. Jersey has become my best friend. The bond we have is incredible. It all paid off in the long run.

Chase is just a baby. He needs more time. Buy a book on obedience and set up your own training plan. I know that sometimes local shelters/ASPCA/etc. will do low cost obedience classes sometimes. Like Sandy said, does your base offer something? Maybe you could start one on the base if they don't already offer one. Look into all your options. When you're not home, crate him. If he's not crate trained yet, make that your first priority. That helped us so much with house breaking. The other thing that helped us with house breaking were treats. Jersey is totally food motivated. I started giving her treats the second she was done going potty outside. Within a few weeks she was going to the door on her own.

If you can make it through the next few months, I promise you, it will get better. Raising a puppy is not easy. It takes a lot of hard work and time, as I'm sure you know. However, if it doesn't work out and you have to re-home Chase, please find a rescue to surrender him to. I hope you don't have to give up though.
 

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Please, don't get upset by the other posts here. We're all passionate about our dogs and would do almost anything for them. I can't even begin to tell you what I did for my Amber to keep her with me for just a few extra weeks. The people here are anything but closed minded and harsh. I wish that I had known about this board when I was in your shoes. I'm sure it would have made things so much easier for me. I'm sure that you'll be supported in your decision, no matter what it ends up being.
 

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Sorry to hear that Chase is causing so many issues, but I think the others have offered some reasonable advice.

As a fellow beagle owner, I would like to offer to foster Chase though my local Beagle rescue if the need arises. I hope things turn the corner soon, and he becomes an even more cherished member of the family.
 
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