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Hello!!!!
I have an adorable 5 month old Beagle named Sydney...but he is driving me nuts!!! About a week ago I bought him a gentle leader as reccomended by the dog training school he is enrolled in. It has been about a week and he absolutly HATES it. Whenever I put it on him he will just lay down and pout. I had it on him for about 2.5 hours yesterday, and was running around like an idiot trying to get him to play, and i was offering him lots of treats, but he wanted nothing to do with me. He even peed on my couch (and he is pretty much house trained).

Any suggestions on getting my little guy use to his gentle leader?????
 

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I really don't know much about those, but why did you put it on him if you weren't walking him? If you're not working on his training at that time, you can take it off of him. Choke collars usually work when training dogs, and don't cause discomfort unless the dog pulls so you could try that. Or you could use a harness. they give you more control of your dog b/c when you pull back, the dog's front legs are lifted off the ground so its harder for them to resist.
 

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I would not recommend any kind of choke or pinch collar on a beagle. They are stubborn enough not to care about the 'correction', and the pressure might damage their windpipe. Heck, even a standard collar can do that. Daisy would pull until she hacked with the regular collar, and I could see eventual damage being a possibility. I switched to a harness and it works well. She's definitely not a great walker - too busy sniffing, but the harness does give me more control, and I don't worry about hurting her.
 

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I agree, I used a "choke collar" for my keeshond many years ago, and it worked very well, but beagles are PULLERS, and it can hurt them. I have not used the gentle leader - tho a trainer did suggest them - I really prefer a harness - I don't get to take my dogs "walking" often, because I have too many and it's hard to get them out one at a time - but I do prefer a harness when TRYING to walk a beagle!
 

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Quote:Originally posted by beaglesmom:
I agree, I used a "choke collar" for my keeshond many years ago, and it worked very well, but beagles are PULLERS, and it can hurt them. I have not used the gentle leader - tho a trainer did suggest them - I really prefer a harness - I don't get to take my dogs "walking" often, because I have too many and it's hard to get them out one at a time - but I do prefer a harness when TRYING to walk a beagle!
These type "choke collars" maybe good on large breed dogs but not on beagles. Beagles will pull until they choke themselves. Tried one on Shiloh for a while and he almost choked his self number of times and was always coughing and choking. I was afraid he might hurt himself !
 

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What is a gentle leader?

anyway, I just use a collar and a lead for Glover, he has mastered the walk perfectly now, I don't make him go heal or anything and let him sniff his favourite spots when on walks lol. When he grows a bit I will be using a harness.

When we started Walking Glover he used to refuse going anywhere! we had to drag him! so we gave him a break for a couple ofdays and after that he has been fantastic!

I think you've introduced the lead enough to him, just try to get Sydney out there, he'll eventually love it!

oh by the way, Glover is almost 5months too!
 

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The gentle leader is a type of collar. I'm not sure we can post links here, but if you'll just plug "gentle leader" into your browser, you'll come up with information about it. I DO have a couple - just haven't really "experimented" with it much. Got it when a trainer suggested using it for beagles.
By the way, I had my Keeshond for about 15 years - and got her in 1985 - everyone at that time was using "choke" collars, but I've never had one on one of my beagles. I just don't like them. I really prefer the "step in" type harness for the beagles, it's so much easier on both of us!
 

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The gentle leader or halti is not a training tool that I ever recommend. I am not a fan of it at all, and it should certainly NOT be left on a dog for 2 hours!

As with any training tool, pinch collars, check chains and yes even gentle leaders should never be used unless you have a training program to go with them and have been shown how to use the tool by a knowledgable trainer! People rarely correctly use check chains, prongs/pinch collars and haltis (not that there is a 'good' way to use them) because they don't know how or have not been shown how to use them properly.

Those that have had no luck with prongs or check chains (and not every tool will work for every dog) what training program were you using with these tools?

Collars, harnesses etc are all training aids, not cures or quick fixes, and not one will stop a dog pulling on the lead without a good training program to go with it.

I personally love and use martingale collars, they are comfortable for the dog to wear and are adjustable so are much more effective than check chain. An eg of a martingale collar:

http://www.twosmallpuppies.com/index.php...hbt2ddf88ne77b4

I have a Siberian Husky as well as a beagle, and both breeds are known pullers. One of the most effective ways to teach them how to walk nicely on the lead is to stop and change direction each time the dog pulls on the lead. This teaches the dog to walk by your side.
 

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i have a harness on my puppy. he has been wearing it since i brought him home. he didnt like it at first and would try to get it off but now he is used to it.

we went on our first walk yesterday... he pulled a little but i use a longer leash so he has a bit of room to walk. He is a typical hunter though. he was out in front walking in a zig zag pattern. he did really well with a longer leash. but when i came across other dogs or people i just brought him closer to me.
 

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We use gentle leaders they are not choke collars thet are a head collar, they give you control of the dogs head and virtually stops pulling all together. We find them extreamly handy if we are going to country shows and alike where there are lots of people and foodon the floor and interesting smells. We find them to be very good at keeping our beags under control. The only downside to them is in hot weather when they can restrict panting to a degree.
 

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Gentle Leaders and some of the other "newer" things were not around when I got my Keeshond in 1985 - when I took her to obedience training, the trainer REQUIRED choke chains. When I took JoJo to "puppy classes", the trainer just suggested regular "flat collars". I like martingales, too - and have a couple, but for the most part I like harnesses for walking mine, but that's just my preference.
 

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First, Kudos to you for taking Sydney to a training school. It is an investment well worth it.

We used Gentle Leaders when Lucy and Flora were in training classes. Lucy was fine with hers (but not happy). Flora hated hers, and would sulk during class when she wore it, but eventually dealt with it, and did fine in class.

I agree that Gentle Leaders should only be used under the guidance of an experienced trainer, one used to the ways of hounds (or at least terriers). There are many, many wrong ways to use a Gentle Leader.

Putting it on during supervised playtime is a good idea. Eventually Sydney should begin to associate it with good things, but if Sydney is as stubborn as Flora, it will take about a month.

Here's a suggestion: Put the Gentle Leader on Sydney. Have playtime (whether or not Sydney plays). Do some training exercises. Take off Gentle Leader. Do more training exercises. If Sydney listens better without the Gentle Leader than with it, don't worry about using it. If Sydney doesn't listen, put the Gentle Leader back on, and keep working on the training exercises.

For Lucy and Flora, the Gentle Leader was a signal that this was not run-around-like-a-fluff-head time, and they'd pay more attention.

Final suggestion: NEVER, NEVER jerk a leash attached to a Gentle Leader. It is too easy to injure the dog's neck.
 

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As Lucy's mom has suggested using a Gentle Leader successfully depends most importantly on getting your Beagle to accept wearing it FIRST way before you even attempt to take him for a walk in it.

Some dogs accept them very quickly whilst others take a bit more time.

They don't feel normal to your dog, particulary if he is used to wearing a regular collar. The pressure across the bridge of the nose feels weird and has a calming effect too which can make some dogs seem depressed.

It took me 3 weeks to get my first dog to accept wearing one and 2 days to get my second dog to, so they are all different.

The Gentle Leader in my mind is an excellent piece of equipment when close heel work is needed on a dog that hasn't yet been taught to heel properly. Or in situations like Barking Mad suggested when you need to keep your Beagles nose off the ground.

BUT they are no substitute for correct training. They don't teach your dog anything. If you don't train your dog to heel when you take the Gentle Leader off and try to walk your dog in a regular collar he will still pull.

Incidently I don't use them anymore but I would if I needed to.
 

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One thing I did when trying to teach my dog how to walk was carry a lot of treats. I had bought a nylon no-slip collar - she loves to sniff and wander, but I wanted her to understand that being with me was awesome and that smell over there wasn't really that great.

So, I started out by putting the collar on her (even just a regular collar) and leash. I started practicing her sits and downs on the leash, and heels. Giving her treats like crazy. We eventually made it outside and when she'd start to pull, I'd give just a light tug (only with finger strength, not the whole hand), called her name and when she'd look at me, I'd give her a treat. Then I would go the opposite way in which she wanted.

You basically have to be very patient when teaching your dog to walk on a leash. Even with very intelligent dogs like Beagles, it will take a while. While I do not own a Beagle yet, I would assume the training is the same - regardless of the breed. Patience, kindness and short lessons.

Make the experience of him wearing any kind of collar or harness an enjoyable experience. He's nervous and doesn't understand it. It's like when they are chewing on something you really don't want them to chew on, you distract them and replace whatever it is with something better and acceptable. Create a good situation for the dog, and he'll start to understand what you expect from him. Don't punish him while wearing it for the bad behavior. He doesn't understand.

IMO, I don't think Gentle Leaders are your answer. I think that this is unatural for the dog and might cause some discomfort.
 

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In what way do you think them unatural Jamie? Just out of curiosity.

No type of restraint is exactly natural for a dog is it!! Even a regular collar is unatural. If you never ever put a regular collar on your dog and trained it to wear a Gentle Leader from day one it would never know any different. They only cause discomfort if not fitted properly or not used correctly, like most restraints.

It's no more unatural to me than putting a halter on a horse or a harness on a ferret.
 

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I just think that the whole idea of leading my dog by the "head" is unatural. I think it is more forceful and the pressure is there, even when you are not tugging - in what pack of dogs does an Alpha continuously hold the subordinate dogs nose or keep a continuous bite on the neck? It is usually a one-two thing. It's quick and the subordinate learns.

I do agree that any kind of collar or harness is also unatural, but I find that it causes less distress to the animal itself, just like a necklace or a turtleneck on a human would be.

This is also just my opinion and am not trying to be mean or judging. I enjoy learning new things and can be swayed to feel differently if I read up more about them. But so far what I've read it is meant to make the dog feel subordinate and the whole "follow me" approach is told, not asked of.
 

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Quote:Originally posted by Jamie:
But so far what I've read it is meant to make the dog feel subordinate and the whole "follow me" approach is told, not asked of.
Yep you have a point there and I tend to agree and this is why I don't use them and don't encourage their use long term.

BUT, they are very useful in certain situations whereby you need to be able to walk maybe an untrained dog in the initial stages. They DO have a calming effect, one might call this making the dog subordinate but many people with highly strung dogs regardless of the breed cannot walk their dogs without one.

I have met many people who have been very close to finding a new home for their un-trained/highly strung/nervous/over excitable/too strong for them dog. After trying the Gentle Leader their lives have been turned around and they have kept said dogs, enjoyed their walks and built a much better relationship with them.

And all it took was a few bits of webbing, can't be bad eh :hi:
 

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No, I agree - it can't be all bad! /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/smile.gif
 

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The idea behind the gentle leader is not to lead your dog but to prevent him/her from pulling you through a walk. the gentle leader moves your pup's head down if they try to get ahead of you. Their instinct is when the head goes down they stop and you stop also. They begin to understand that you stop they need to stop also.

It may take longer with the more stubborn breeds like the beagle but if they are USED PROPERLY the dogs are not in any pain. Heel can be one of the most difficult commands to accomplish but being consistent pays off in the end.
 

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I use a harness, works wonderfuly. Sometimes he hesitates going into it, but he is still good with it.
 
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