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Discussion Starter #1
Okay, I'm totally sold on the Beagle breed now (or just Beag cross). And guess what? We FINALLY heard from the housing help place that we're on the list! :bounce: :bounce2: :ecstatic: :happyhappy: :hyper: :woohoo: Finally, no more cramped apartment! Plus my dad being a Veteran gets us a little bit higher up. Hopefully we'll be in a house soon! And once we're settled, here comes the dog! /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/laugh.gif Unless something goes awry and/or the housing takes long than anticipated, I SHOULD be able to get a dog by mid-Fall.

The only problem is, I have to decide in the meantime just which to get. I've heard a lot of pros to getting an adult Beag; especially for a beginner. But I'm kinda selfish. All the dogs over six months over at any shelters already have names. Naming a dog is half the fun! I'm also up in the air about whether to get a male or female. My dad says to get a female 'cause they're easier to house-train; better yet, an adult dog. I know he's worried about my little 21 month old nephew.

But my last dog was about six months old when we rescued her and she already had issues. It took that poor animal months to trust anyone. Plus she was super-shy. I don't want to go through that again. If I get an adult with problems, they'd be even harder to train than a pup.

Then again, if I look, I might be able to find an adult that's already hosuebroken, trained, and good with kids...but of course they'd already have a name and besides that puppies are so darn cute! /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/frown.gif

Any input?

PS: sorry for the long post!
 

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Everyone loves a puppy but puppies are A LOT of work and take a lot of time and dedication to train [properly]. Think of it it terms of a baby. You wouldn't offer to baby sit for someone if you knew you wouldn't have the time or care to dedicate to their child, would you?

Puppies (and I can say this because I'm a mom) are very much like babies. You are responsible for this little furry being...everything you do and don't do to mold and train them will affect them, you and the rest of your family. If you're not RIGHT THERE to teach them right from wrong, correct them, feed them, walk them, clean their ears, clip their nails,interact with them on a constsnt basis, exercise and occupy them it will be very hard on them as well as you and your household.

Yes, an older dog may have some "baggage" (don't we all?) but that doesn't mean that they're any less worthy or capable of love.

On the name thing...yes, I agree naming is a very special thing, but if you find the perfect dog don't like that stop you from getting him or her!

As I said we adopted Abby at 3 months old and the breeder had orgininally intended to keep her for himself but on a whim decided to bring her to meet my boyfriend and suprise! that's the one he chose for me. Abby was the oldest of the bunch at 12 weeks, the rest were 7 and the only red and white beagle in the bunch. Béla was also told by the breeder that Abby might have an issue with her back legs.

I don't know if I would have picked her if I, myself had been the one to meet the breeder. I'm actually glad I wasn't because, despite her bow legs and "unique" coloring Abby is soooo perfect. She is my best friend! It's a match made in heaven.

As for why I wanted a female...I wanted a female for the plain and simple fact that I am a female /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/laugh.gif Though not that I have my "girl" I'm open to either or when we get another beagle.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I didn't mean it that way. There's just been too much stress lately and there was way too much heartbreak with my last 'problem' dog. Don't get me wrong, I loved her to death. I just don't want to go through that again.
 

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I got Monty when he was 3 months old, and looking back I wish i would have gotten an adult rescue. Don't get me wrong, I love my Monty to death, but it has been a real hard and long process getting him trained. If I had known how long it would take to get him potty trained, and how much he would have destroyed, i might have thought twice! My advice, if you do get a pup, make sure you have the time and funds to take him to obediance class, and that he gets socialized alot right from the start. Make sure that someone can and will be home with him alot in the beginning. When we got Monty, both my boyfriend and I work fulltime, so he spends alot of time by himself, and I know he gets lonley.

Maybe, get an adult rescue - this will get you used to having a dog again, and you can save a dog that needs your help. which in my opinion is much for satisfying then naming a pup. Then, if you still really really want a pup...get your adult a friend! Not only would they not be lonley anymore, but maybe the older one will help you with training the younger one!

Sorry so long, just want to help /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/smile.gif
 

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I completely understand! As I said I WANTED a puppy, but after having one, and reading about all the sweet rescuse/adult beags on this site, I've decided that the only thing better in loving and molding a puppy is loving and working with a rescue or older dog.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Yeah, I was kinda worried about the training bit. I didn't do such a good job last time and this time I promised myself to go to an obediance class. Plus I have college during the day.

The 'pal' later on, I'm a little wary of. We already have a cat and there's a limit around here; no more than three 'large' animals, and my dad may want to get another dog for himself once we've moved. If he does maybe they can keep each other company; if not, there's always the chance that he/she and the cat will get along.
 

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We got Fin at around 6 months and he was a terror. He's just now starting to calm down so I would suggest training right away. As for the naming, we changed Fin's name and after less than a week he knew it. I do agree with other people on this board that puppies are hard work and there are so many rescue beags in need of a good home. You should sit down and list the pros and cons for getting a puppy vs. an adult dog. When you have a puppy you have to think of all the vaccinations, neutering, meds (Advantix, etc.). That can get really expensive and time consuming.
 

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Beaglebabe and Letty are right about the amount of work it takes to raise a puppy. I got a puppy, and overall I'm glad I did, but there were a lot of times when I wondered if it was a mistake. Plus, just because a dog is a baby doesn't mean it won't have issues to work through.

Spend a lot of time thinking about whether you and your family are willing and able to:

1. take a puppy out to go to the bathroom every hour during the day, and wake up and take him out a couple of times at night.

2. Introduce him to all different kinds of people and places for socialization (a lot of dogs who show fear towards certain types of people/experiences just weren't introduced to them during the critical first 16 weeks of life.

3. Deal with nipping, scratching, crying at night, chewing, accidents on the rug, upset stomach causing messes at both ends of the pup, etc. Not all of these things are daily events, but a slightly older dog will have outgrown a lot of this.

If you do decide on a puppy, be very careful where you get it. A poorly bred dog can be cheap up front, but a lot of trouble in the long run.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Point taken. It's been years since there was a puppy in the house, so I'd forgotten what it's like. /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/shocked.gif
There is a local breeder mentioned on the AKC website. But unless I win the lottery, I just can't afford to buy from a breeder. That's why I mentioned a beagle cross.

I'm a compulsive list-maker, so I've already made a list with pros and cons of pups and adults, and those results already point to an adult dog. /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/shocked.gif I'm just a little stubborn and wanted to get my info from the source in case I missed something.

Oh, well. As Laxmobster mentioned, I can always re-name the pooch. I was just a little worried that the dog would only respond to its old name; a name that sounded ridiculous calling out at the top of my lungs. :redface:

Thanks for such prompt and helpful responses!
 

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when we got Polly, she was 8 weeks old--we were choosing between her and a 1 year old male Beagle...well, the male beagle was taller than our Georgia, so we decided on the baby.
Guess what, the baby is now more terrier than beagle, and she's taller than Georgia... /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/eek.gif
If you are going with a possible mix, it's hard to tell what they will turn out to be like when they are a baby...
of course, we love her and all that, now that she's housebroken (whew!)...
our reasonings were just kind of dumb. That male dog would have been perfect for our family. :rolleyes:
 

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Well, it looks as if we are having puppies here in the next week or so ... so.. heheh /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/wink.gif
Looking back, I had gotten 2 at once, my first dogs, at about 6 wks old. would NEVER recommend that to anyone. I loved it, but it was SO hard, no sleep, wrecked our $1700 new carpet.. not the best idea. I would have just gotten one and been done with it then I wouldnt have another brood due here now from the last pup!
Anyhow, look around at local shelters when it is time, you will find the right one...
Judi
 

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I've done both the puppy & rescue route. For me a rescue was the right choice. When I got Emma she was 2 yrs old & had the name Sophie. When you 1st change the dogs name use it over & over. Don't use nick names until they have the real one down. Everytime I talked to Emma I made sure to use her name. I sounded like a moron, but she knew her name within a week or so.
Emma had many issues, but now (a yr later) she is over most of them. The best thing for her was taking her to a dog park once a week. At 1st she was terrified, but soon discovered all the people & most of the dogs where nice. It helped her to come out of her shell.
 

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We have three rescues, all adopted as adults (youngest at 7 months, oldest at 3 years) and I highly recommend the adult route - obviously as we have done it twice since the first time!

I really wouldn't get too hung up on the name issue. As others have said, it really isn't that difficult to change an adult dog's name - you just have to consistent in using the new name and not the old and they'll get the picture soon enough.

Our middle beagle Moose was "Joey" before we adopted him at 1 1/2, and he was responding consistently to Moose within days. We don't know our youngest beagle's original name as she was a stray. The rescue had then named her Lucy so she was called that for a few weeks when in the foster home, and then we named her Popcorn and she started responding to that pretty much immediately.

Sometimes I check with Moosie and call him Joey just to see if he responds - but there is absolutely no reaction at this point... I think whatever you call them to call them to dinner is the name they will respond to!!
 

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"If you do decide on a puppy, be very careful where you get it. A poorly bred dog can be cheap up front, but a lot of trouble in the long run. "


When we got Monty from the breeder, we got him for 1/2 price because he has a scar on his head. They said it was there from birth, and they couldn't breed him, and no one else wanted him. It broke my heart they way they talked about no one wanting him. I knew the minute she said that, that even though it was a 2 hour drive, and i hadn't even seen a picture of him, that he was the lil' guy for me!

Point being, not all cheap dogs are going to give you problems...Monty still has the scar - a little bald spot - but i think it gives him character! But definatly talk with the breeder and even a vet if your unsure if it will cause any problems /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/smile.gif
 

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Hi Dogless (for now), Beagle puppies are the cutest creatures on earth!! And they smell so sweet!! It gives you a good feeling to "start from scratch" raising a dog--a real sense of accomplishment when you've finally reached success with potty training and obedience. That being said, I would vote for you getting an adult rescue. Yes, they do come with "baggage" that sometimes takes a while to work through. But one thing you need to think about is that everyone in your house is likely going to need to be involved in the potty training in the beginning, depending on what your class schedule is. Puppy bladders just aren't that big! Would everybody be willing to help?
We got Shiloh at 2 months from a breeder, and she is my heart, but my next dog will be an adult rescue. I figure there are just too many dogs out there literally dying for a good home!
I can't really say whether boys or girls are easier to housebreak. The only boy we've had was our standard poodle Coco, and he was a year and a half when we got him.(He was also the best-trained dog we've ever had, probably because we didn't train him!! /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/laugh.gif ) BTW, his name wasn't Coco when he came to live with us. He learned his new name fairly quickly.
Good luck with whatever you decide. And'may the force be with you.' /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/wink.gif
 

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A difficult decision. Puppies are cute but one has to reckon with a year of destruction in the house. Our first two beagles were six months old and taken from homes where the owners had gone despair. Our present two were 5 years old when we got them. Also a lot of problems (still have) but ours are ex research beagles. If you adopt a beagle from a rescue centre you are probably saving a life. You can change the name. Rescues adore their owners its as if they know they have been saved from death.
Think over everything very carefully before getting a dog at all, usually a dog is for up to 15 years.
Good luck whatever you decide.
 

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I have one adult rescue adopted at 3-4 years of age; I renamed him with no problem (his owner surrendered him, and his name was 'Trouble' :angryfire: ) NO WAY was I going to call him that! Like Sherock's Emma, Calvin knew his name pretty quickly.
I took him through obedience right away, and learned a LOT about him through that experience. I had great trainers with a lot of experience working with rescues (our Humane Society also gives a discount on basic obedience with the local Obedience Training Club)
My experience with Calvin has been great overall.

Next, along comes my beagle rescue Maggie; She was about 6 weeks old when I got her (not exactly sure of her age).....and the next year was a blur...just like the first year with an infant. I can't agree more....a Beagle Puppy is the cutest creature on earth....and most of them grow up to be wonderful loving family members. However, at about 6 to 12 months, I thought I'd lose my mind. Maggie destroyed furniture, carpeting, shoes, clothes....countless things I try to forget.
I would never talk anybody out of getting a beagle pup; I think that's what you SHOULD do if you go into puppy adoption with eyes wide open. Most people make the mistake of thinking of obedience training as a 'one time thing', It's a life-long thing whether you get a pup or an adult. Educate yourself, know what to expect, read lots of books , and decide if you can give a pup 24/7 thought and attention.

I wouldn't do anything over. There are both pros and cons to adult adoption and puppy adoption. And remember this sage advice......

THE ONLY REASON GOD MADE BEAGLE PUPPIES SO CUTE IS SO YOU WON'T KILL THEM. :biglaugh:
 
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