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I am not sure if I have asked about this before. The idea of fostering is something I have thought about for some time - maybe do some shor-term fostering. However I don't know if I would even be approved since I work full time. I'm just wondering what I would need. The main floor of my house is open - I can possibly block off my kitchen - I have in the past for the Beaglebratz. I don't even know for sure how the Beaglebratz would react to this. I'm wondering too what I would need - as in a crate and other supplies. Also, I am not able to drive but do have a 24/7 vet clinic not more than a block away along with an ER vet not more than a block in the other direction. As I said, only in the thinking/questioning mode right now. I would limit to Beagles - possibly Westies and Cairns since those are the 3 breeds I am most familiar with (my sis has had Westies for 30 years - she lives a couple miles from me).

Bak to work.........
 

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Hi Kim! I don't have any answers for you, as I've never fostered a dog. BUT...I've also been thinking about it, and wondering if I would be accepted due to Hubby and I working all day. One of my boys is almost always home during the day, but I'm not sure if they would factor that in. Also, I'm a little afraid I might get too attached, and not be able to give a foster up. It will be interesting to see the replies to this post!
 

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Most of our foster parents work. The majority of people who adopt also work and the beagles do fine. You would probably need a crate. I think our foster parents provide food but the rescue pays medical costs. I know that all of the rescues desperately need foster homes. Many of the dogs are older and are OK with the run of the house when no one is home. Most rescues try to make a good match between foster home and dog. Some of our dogs are in foster care only a few weeks, we have a senior that has been in her foster home a year.
When you are ready to give it a try just complete an application on a rescue website. They will call to interview you and then you can find out the specifics.
 

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I work all day, sometimes 10 hours a day, and the pups do fine. It is amazing how well they will adapt to your schedule. Undoubtedly, the most difficult part of fostering is giving the animal up once his/her forever home is found. I keep reminding myself that this dog IS NOT MINE, and that I was meant to be a part of it's life for a reason. The tears of sadness when we give them up are nothing compared to the opportunity for a new life in a permanent home.
 

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I have been an active foster parent for Beagle paws for over a year now and both me and hubby work full time,they provide with the crates and supplies needed yet i never accept them as i have my own supplies.
I have cried over every foster that has left my care whether to a new home or RIP Sadie over the rainbow bridge,It is difficult yet i know they are going to a good home.
Ohh on a very short side note when i move back to the city next month i will be taught how to do home visits and all the interview stuff

Please feel free to send me a message and ask any question you want to i would be glad to help.
 

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Also i live about 30mins away from the nearest vet and i do not drive.
My main supplies i have on hand at all times is
-Extra collars(to send to their new home in)since many have none
-Extra Leashes(to send to their new home in)since many have none
-Extra toys(I like to send their favorite toy with them when they are adopted)
-Extra harnesses(as i harness all my dogs)
-Lots of blankets(since i tend to send them to their new homes with one of those too)
Most of all lots of
-Love
-Patients
-Understanding
Sometimes it is alot of work but well worth it(i have broke down and cried more than once)
 
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