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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,

I'm new to this forum and my wife and I are planning on getting a 12-week old beagle puppy from a local, certified breeder in a couple of days. Both my wife and I work from 9:00am - 6:00pm during the week. We purchased the wire crate + x-pen combo (manufacturer - MidWest) for the 12 week old beagle puppy to play in while we are gone. We bought all sorts of toys to occupy his time when where gone. However, I Youtubed "beagle escape" and started to freak out. Check this video:
. From what I've read, beagles are quite the escape artists. To add to this, my wife and I moved into our first home last month, after 7 months of remodeling. We have new furniture and appliances, and I am worried that a beagle escape during work times will make what's relatively new and clean to wet and damaged. When the proper time comes, me or my wife will drop off the puppy to a doggy day care on Wednesdays so it can socialize with other animals mid-week, but what we're concerned about is if boredom will cause the begale puppy to ravage our house and belongings on Mondays, Tuesdays, Thursdays, and Fridays. Doggy day care is quite expensive. We really want a beagle and would treat it like our own child. We also plan to wake up at least an hour earlier to feed, play and care for the puppy before we leave for work so he doesn't feel completely neglected during work hours. Any insight would be much appreciated. Thanks.
 

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Well, just remember that's one particular video. I can also attest to my beagle, Hailey, and others that I've met who are absolutely not escape artists. We worried a bit when we first got Hailey wondering if she'll chew leather shoes, couches, etc, but overall it's their attitude and personality. Pups are going to be more energetic and get into more trouble than older dogs but it's one of those things that may end up 'wait and see' scenarios.

I work from 6am to 5pm on a daily basis, Hailey has the run of a rather large laundry room complete with a small bed, water, etc. She seems relatively happy about it and enjoys the radio I keep running for her as well. Perhaps you need to figure out a section of the home that you can setup a puppy/baby gate and segment it off. When I'm around the house, she has the run of the place, even if I'm outside for a few hours as well.

Best of luck.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I appreciate your response. How old is your beagle? I was hesitant mentioning that I work 8 hours a day, because I do feel bad that neither my wife and I can be with the puppy during work hours. But we gotta make money to provide for our future puppy! We have designated our laundry room and part of the kitchen for the puppy to roam when we are out. Did you use an x-pen for your puppy or did you just section off areas by using a pet gate? The idea of using a radio is great. Is this somewhat proven to minimize the puppy from feeling lonely by hearing music/sounds other than silence? Also, what do you think the age of a beagle should be when they are allowed to use the dog door to eliminate and play outside when they are alone in the house? Out laundry room has a door that opens to our completely fenced yard.
 

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I would wait for a while before giving the puppy access to the backyard until you know if he is a digger or an escape artist. Putting his pen in a room is a good idea. If you find he doesn't escape, you can move it to a bigger room later if you want. It is always an adventure with a new dog. FYI, my Tucker is 17" tall at the shoulders and we can confine him with a 12" fence. He just won't jump it. Now our 2 new girls can and will jump over a 3 ' fence. They also like to chew things. We have a crate for them now if we are gone, though not for a long time. Tucker on the other hand has complete access to almost anywhere in the house. No Pantry access.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Tucker - Since we are plainning on picking up the puppy this Sunday, my wife and I will take him around the yard throughout the holiday weekend to get accimated to his new home. When do you suggest we expose the puppy to the rest of the house? I've read that exposing the puppy to the run of house isn't a good idea at first. We plan on taking his crate into our bedroom when we go to sleep just in case he whines and needs to go potty.
 

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We got Bianca at 6 weeks of age. From the first day we got her, we started to introduce the crate. Those first 2-3 weeks we slept downstairs with the air mattress next to her crate as she woke up every couple of hours to go potty. Luckily, I had the opportunity to work from home those first couple of weeks as well and what I did was when she fell asleep to put her in her crate. More and more, kept using the crate as a positive experience.

As of today, Bianca is 5 months of age and is able to stay in the crate from 8AM until I get home at 4PM. She doesn't soil her crate and is ready for love, affection, and food when I get home :)

Basically my word of advice is to use that crate! Keep the associations with it positive and she will take to it very well.

Good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Bianca - Thanks for your response. We'll definitely crate train. We're looking forward to it. I'm sure our experience on puppy's first day/night will be extremely exciting and scary at the same time!
 

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Bianca - Thanks for your response. We'll definitely crate train. We're looking forward to it. I'm sure our experience on puppy's first day/night will be extremely exciting and scary at the same time!
No problem. Yeah if you stay consistent with the crate you will get great results! As you have probably read, they do not want to soil their living area so if it's done right they will hold their potty as long as possible and soon enough it'll be long enough for you to come back from work. Honestly it only took Bianca about a month for her to completely hold it. And for the record we do leave talk radio on for her so she can sleep with human voices in the background. Even days that I am working from home, she plops down and sleeps the whole time.

Also, I should mention that we have had no problems with Bianca escaping her crate. That thing is pretty solid :)
 

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I work 8 hours a day but do run home for lunch. However if I counldn't Molly would be safe baby-gated in our kitchen. She is always in there when we arent home and she has toys, a kong, non-shreddable bedding, a view of the side yard out the door and her water bowl. Oh, and the TV on. I wouldn't leave her outside because she is tiny and a troublemaker. That combination would lead to escape.

As for your pup, be sure she really knows your yard and neighborhood well in case of an escape. Also if you have a yard gate you may want to put a "bewareof dog" sign on it to keep people like meter readers from opening your gate.
 

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What a cool video! I was pulling hard for that little guy...

For what it's worth, I would be absolutely floored if I ever saw my Boone do that. But then again, she's never been in a situation where climbing something was necessary.

As for keeping your new pet home during the day, the thing I would worry about is the fact that you are getting a 12-week old. When we got our girl, I happened to be working from home so that worked out great. As a young pup (8 weeks), she had to relieve herself every couple of hours, and wanted tons of attention. I think it was good that I was able to basically be there at all times with her. I certainly didn't pay her attention 100% of the time, and we still went through crate training etc, but we did get to play during the day and I think that was important, at least for us.

I went back to working at an actual office when Boone was about 6 months old. But I am able to come home for lunch every day to let her out, spend some time together, make myself a sandwich...

Bottom line though, I think dogs, beagles in particular, are able and willing to adjust to any schedule you need them to be on.

Good luck!
 

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The arrival of a new puppy in a household can be a time of great excitement and joy. You want to make sure your puppy is happy and healthy, but it is also important that you begin shaping his character from an early age. Here are a few simple training techniques that are crucial in obedience training and can help make the bond between you and your new pup strong and healthy.

When you ask something of your puppy, praise him when he does it. Praise and reward is the most effective way to train your puppy and get him behaving the way you want him to. If he doesn’t follow your command, give an appropriate correction. Be stern, but do not use violence or let your temper get the best of you. This will misadjust your dog and lead to other behavioral problems.

Repetition is key. Repeating your commands often will help your dog learn what it needs to do. Stick with short phrases that are easy for your puppy to memorize, and make sure you are clear in your commands.
Be fair and understanding. Do not expect your dog to do something he has not been taught to do. Do not punish your dog for something he has not done, and if a correction is in order, correct him when you catch him in the act. Dogs do not have the capacity to remember things, or feel remorse in the same way that humans do, so timing is critical. Understanding this is crucial in dog training and can save you time and effort.
Finding what motivates your dog towards proper behavior is important. It will play a major part in your dog’s training. Training schools are effective, but you must be able to communicate with your dog effective on your own. Be patient and loving, and the training will come naturally.

Providing your puppy or dog with an indoor kennel crate can satisfy many dogs' need for a den-like enclosure. Besides being an effective housebreaking tool (because it takes advantage of the dog's natural reluctance to soil its sleeping place), it can also help to reduce separation anxiety, to prevent destructive behavior (such as chewing furniture), to keep a puppy away from potentially dangerous household items (i.e., poisons, electrical wires, etc.), and to serve as a mobile indoor dog house which can be moved from room to room whenever necessary.

A kennel crate also serves as a travel cabin for you dog when travelling by car or plane. Additionally, most hotels which accept dogs on their premises require them to be crated while in the room to prevent damage to hotel furniture and rugs.

Most dogs which have been introduced to the kennel crate while still young grow up to prefer their crate to rest in or "hang-out" in. Therefore a crate (or any other area of confinement) should NEVER be used for the purpose of punishment.

I recommend that you provide a kennel crate throughout your dog's lifetime. Some crates allow for the removal of the door once it is no longer necessary for the purpose of training. The crate can be placed under a table, or a table top can be put on top of it to make it both unobtrusive and useful.

Toys and Treats: Place your puppy's favorite toys and dog treats at the far end opposite the door opening. These toys may include the "Tuffy", "Billy", "Kong", "Nylabone" or a ball. Toys and bails should always be inedible and large enough to prevent their being swallowed. Any fragmented toys should be removed to prevent choking and internal obstruction. You may also place a sterilized marrow bone filled with cheese or dog treats in the crate.

Water: A small hamster-type water dispenser with ice water should be attached to the crate if your puppy is to be confined for more than two hours in the crate.

Bedding: Place a towel or blanket inside the crate to create a soft, comfortable bed for the puppy. If the puppy chews the towel, remove it to prevent the pup from swallowing or choking on the pieces. Although most puppies prefer lying on soft bedding, some may prefer to rest on a hard, flat surface, and may push the towel to one end of the crate to avoid it. If the puppy urinates on the towel, remove bedding until the pup no longer eliminates in the crate.

There are alternative methods to crating very young puppies and puppies who must be left alone in the house for lengths of time exceeding the recommended maximum duration of confinement. I suggest the following:

Use a small to medium-sized room space such as a kitchen, large bathroom or hallway with non- porous floor. Set up the crate on one end, the food and water a few feet away, and some newspaper (approx. 2'x3' to 3'x3') using a 3 to 4 layer thickness, several feet away. Confine your puppy to this room or area using a 3 ft. high, safety-approved child's gate rather than shutting off the opening by a solid door. Your pup will feel less isolated if it can see out beyond its immediate place of confinement. Puppy proof the area by removing any dangerous objects or substances.

We all must remember, that dogs really should not be left alone in the first place. So, your house should not be torn up, because he will be in doggy daycare or in a crate. Puppies are a lot of work, no lie, and beagles are as well. They are hyper, and do require a good amount of attention and exercise. Now, I work 8-10 hours a day, as well as my husband, but you have to make time for them when you get home. Also, anyone would tell you, a beagle should always be on a leash, and if properly trained with a properly built fence, there should not be too much of a problem. This video is pretty extreme, I doubt this will happen, but I am sure all of us have expereinced an excaped beagle. Should keep an eye on them in the yard, and never leave them alone in the yard....I did that once, for like, 15 minutes...in this 15 minutes, Cassidy escaped, made it 2 blocks, fell in a neighbors pool, and ripped all of her nails out....that was an expensive vet visit. But, needless to say, this is with most dogs anyway. The crate should only be large enough to allow the puppy to stand up and turn around, nothing bigger.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Thanks, everyone for your responses. We are more confident that we will provide time and love to our future puppy. We can't wait! Visiting him in 2 days!
 

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We got Willie when he was about 19 months old, so not a total pup (although there is still quite enough puppy in him), and he came to us with adult bladder control and already housebroken, which was important to us. We both work 8-hour days (closer to 8.5-9 when you factor in traffic) and cannot come home midday, so we couldn't get a dog so young that it required a midday potty break. Willie does still have some issues with urinating while we are gone, but it seems to be behaviorally motivated/anxiety-related rather than a physical issue. No pooping problems - he's only had a couple of those types of accident in the house, and one was when he was brand new, so to be expected. The other time was our fault, we misinterpreted the reason for his bark.

He absolutely cannot have free roam of the house when left alone, he's too curious, too ingenious at getting at and into things, and too much of a chewer. We tested out some different methods, including confining him to specific parts of the house, but have come to the conclusion that we really don't have any option but to crate. There isn't really any appropriate area of our house to confine him that works well, because of the architecture and setup of our house, and he's definitely of the "escape artist" variety...he can open any unlocked door, and can jump/climb any gate. He has been known to actually drag furniture over to use as a ladder to get past a barrier, if he needs to. It's pretty ingenious, if maddening. He really doesn't enjoy his crate, or being left alone, but both are necessary. I don't think it's the crate that he objects to, as he sleeps most of the day on days when I'm home and I'm sure does, eventually, in the crate as well...but he isn't fond of being left alone. We're hoping he'll acclimate. I don't know that he'll ever be a dog that chooses his crate as a place to curl up and chill out, though. He's got his spots that he prefers (under the desk, on his slipcovered spot on the couch, at the foot of the bed).

We did have one incident of him breaking out of his crate, while we were travelling and staying at my boyfriend's mom's house. His crate is a wire, collapsible one, for ease of travel, and that means the side walls clip onto the roof when it's set up. This was when we had first gotten him, and he apparently rattled his crate so much that the clips popped out and he escaped and ran amok throughout the house for a couple of hours. He hasn't done it before or since, but we did reinforce the clip areas of the crate with zip ties on the remainder of that trip.

He also roamed our 4-foot fenced backyard with no mishap for about three months, and then, one fateful night, he was out for a short roam in the yard, and a rabbit ran through. He was GONE, over the fence in a heartbeat. It took us an hour to retrieve him, late at night in the snow. Now that he knows he can get over the fence, he can't be in the yard off tether or leash, which makes me sad. I liked being able to give him that time, but all it takes is once, and he'll never stay put again. The nose is too strong, as is the bred-in chasing instinct.

I agree with the poster who mentioned that these dogs do seem to be able to adapt to what schedule you need them to be on (barring, of course, leaving them for so long that they can't physically hold it anymore). Consistency is key, though, and you absolutely have to make sure that you are working TONS of exercise opportunities into your time home with your dog if he or she is being crated for a full workday. We have to get up at about 5:45 a.m. so that he can get a good 45-minute walk and still give us time to get ready for work. He does better in his crate if he's a little worn out and has just pooped and peed. I'd never want to leave him a full day without that good long a.m. walk. He then gets the same when we get home, and, weather permitting, one before bed. He's an active dog, and he'd go stir crazy if he didn't get that time.

I work 8 hours a day but do run home for lunch. However if I counldn't Molly would be safe baby-gated in our kitchen. She is always in there when we arent home and she has toys, a kong, non-shreddable bedding, a view of the side yard out the door and her water bowl.
Mollys Mom, tell me more about your nonshreddable bedding! I would love to leave bedding in Willie's crate, but I've yet to find anything he can't and won't shred.
 

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Mollys Mom, tell me more about your nonshreddable bedding! I would love to leave bedding in Willie's crate, but I've yet to find anything he can't and won't shred.
I'd love to hear about that as well. I even bought a so-called chew-proof bed made by kong, and it lasted all of an afternoon.

When I took it back to the store they couldn't believe it. The look on their face when i explained the culprit was a 9-month old 18 pound beagle was priceless. I got my money back, but I'd love to buy a bed our girl could enjoy without tearing to shreds.
 
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