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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Was wondering how many times a day I should feed the pup...I know some people use a dispenser that always food there, but that just seems like a bad idea with a pup...

also, he's peed indoor about 5 times today...this is just day 2, so that's to be expected, but any suggestions to speed up the process to make him go pee outdoor always?
 

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Maggie's three months old, and I feed her three times a day...per recommendation of our vet. I don't leave the food down all day and let her graze, but rather put it down for 20-30 minutes at a time.

As far as getting Luigi to pee outside, the only advice I have is to take him out frequently, tell him to go potty, and reward or praise him when he does. Maggie still doesn't seem to be getting it, but I'm trying to remain optomistic that some day soon she will! LOL
 

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How old is the puppy? I usually feed my "puppies" 3 times a day until they're 4 or 5 months old - then switch to morning and evening. I would <u>never</u> free feed a beagle - beagles are the "original chow hounds" and you'd be rolling them all over if they were free fed. I know a few beagle owners who can "free feed", but they're few and far between.
As far as "house training" - you have to watch puppies - it can be a lengthy process with beagle puppies, much more so than with any other breed I've ever had. However, here's an article on house training that I found on my beagle group. Hope you find it helpful. Oh and GOOD LUCK!

House Training a Puppy

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The quickest and easiest way to house train your puppy is to rely on your puppy's natural instincts and behavior.



What To Expect During the House Training Process
Unless you can monitor your puppy 24 hours a day, don't expect the house training process to be completed until your puppy is at least 6 months old. It's normal for a young puppy to be a little 'input-output' machine. Since puppies are growing and developing rapidly at this stage, they eat more food, burn up more energy and seem to need to eliminate constantly! They also have not yet developed bowel and bladder control, so they can't 'hold it' as long as adult dogs.

House Training When You Are Not Home
Confine your puppy to a small, 'puppy-proofed' room and paper the entire floor. Put his bed, toys and food/water bowls there. At first there will be no rhyme or reason to where your pup eliminates. He will go every where and any where. He will also probably play with the papers, chew on them, and drag them around his little den. Most puppies do this and you just have to live with it. Don't get upset, just accept it as life with a young puppy. The important thing is that when you get home, clean up the mess and lay down fresh papers.

Passive House Training or Paper Training
While your puppy is confined, he is developing a habit of eliminating on paper because no matter where he goes, it will be on paper. As time goes on, he will start to show a preferred place to do his business. When this place is well established and the rest of the papers remain clean all day, then gradually reduce the area that is papered. Start removing the paper that is furthest away from his chosen location. Eventually you will only need to leave a few sheets down in that area only. If he ever misses the paper, then you've reduced the area too soon. Go back to papering a larger area or even the entire room. Once your puppy is reliably going only on the papers you've left, then you can slowly and gradually move his papers to a location of your choice. Move the papers only an inch a day. If puppy misses the paper again, then you're moving too fast. Go back a few steps and start over. Don't be discouraged if your puppy seems to be making remarkable progress and then suddenly you have to return to papering the entire room. This is normal. There will always be minor set-backs. If you stick with this procedure, your puppy will be paper trained.

House Training When You Are Home
When you are home but can't attend to your puppy, follow the same procedures described above. However, the more time you spend with your puppy, the quicker he will be house trained. Your objective is to take your puppy to his toilet area every time he needs to eliminate. This should be about once every 45 minutes; just after a play session; just after eating or drinking; and just upon waking. When he does eliminate in his toilet area, praise and reward him profusely and enthusiastically! Don't use any type of reprimand or punishment for mistakes or accidents. Your puppy is too young to understand and it can set the house training process back drastically. Don't allow your puppy freedom outside of his room unless you know absolutely for sure that his bladder and bowels are completely empty. When you do let him out, don't let him out of your sight. It is a good idea to have him on leash when he is exploring your home. He can't get into trouble if you are attached to the other end of the leash. Every 30 minutes return your pup to his toilet area. As your puppy becomes more reliable about using his toilet area and his bowel and bladder control develops, he can begin to spend more time outside his room with you in the rest of your home. Begin by giving him access to one room at a time. Let him eat, sleep and play in this room but only when he can be supervised. When you cannot supervise him, put him back in his room.

Active House Training
The most important thing you can do to make house training happen as quickly as possible is to reward and praise your puppy every time he goes in the right place. The more times he is rewarded, the quicker he will learn. Therefore it's important that you spend as much time as possible with your pup and give him regular and frequent access to his toilet area.

Key to Successful House Training
Consistancy and Patience. Never scold or punish your puppy for mistakes and accidents. The older your pup gets, the more he will be able to control his bladder and bowels. Eventually your pup will have enough control that he will be able to "hold it" for longer and longer periods of time. Let your puppy do this on his own time. When training is rushed, problems usually develop. Don't forget, most puppies are not reliably house trained until they are at least 6 months old

http://www.perfectpaws.com/index.html
 

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I have nothing to add (that I can think of anyway)... I would definitely crate train!!!! I think that if you're dealing with a young pup (which you are), that is the best way to house train a puppy.

Good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Yeah, we've started crate training...That paper training seems like a great idea, but we're in a small 2 bedroom apartment...Don't think it'd work in that setting...
 

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Around here we have to be eagle eyed, shoes on, and ready to take (13 wk old) Bernie out constantly (once per hour or more depending on the water intake) to pee if he's not crated. He's a water pig, food pig, and a chewing nutcase (just ask the newly chewed doorframe that apparently got in his way of getting to me in the bathroom!) Bernie whines to go out to poop, but only glances at the door to let you know he has to pee. Thankfully I am home all day with him, and usually catch that glance.

We are working on the "pee time Bernie", and he sometimes heads to the door, to wait the leash (escape artist dog here, that wants to befriend the skunks, possums, and whatever other wild life is out there!) The leash helps to remind him that he's there for a job, and once he's done, he gets to play. He used to make Dave the hubby walk for blocks, over snowbanks etc, before he'd pee. Now they're both a little better trained, and it's out the door, down the stairs, find his spot (one location only), and he's done and ready for play.
 

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I hope that house training and crate training go flawlessly for you and Luigi. If, however, it does NOT...look me up, and we'll talk about options. I've been through the gamut in this house, and so I have lots of different things you can try if the crate training method (which really is the BEST way if you can manage it) fails you.

As for feeding, Luigi is younger than my beagle was when I got her, but we have always fed Kioko twice daily. She is fed in the morning 1/3 of her daily allowance of kibble. I give her the remaining 2/3 while we are eating, but it is set down at her food spot after our family begins our meal (common wisdom I've read for dogs that think they own the house says that you should always allow the dog to view you eating BEFORE you allow the dog to begin eating...it establishes that you are higher in the pack order). Hounds think they own the house, so this helps a lot.

In our home, we say grace, so Kioko's food and water dishes are prepared and put on the table next to my place. She is tethered in our dining area and asked to "sit." When we finish saying grace and everyone has taken their first bites, I set down Kioko's dishes for her to eat.

This may sound over-ritualized, but Kioko has had "issues," and establishing alpha status in every aspect of our day together has helped tremendously.
 

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We fed Duke 3 times as a pup, but he was the rare beagle that didn't always eat what was in his dish. Sometimes he ate twice a day, sometimes only once. Now I put food in his dish in the morning and usually it's gone by the time we get home and he'll get more in the evening, but there are days the food stays in the bowl until the evening. Mind you, he does tend to snitch some of the labs' food, though. LOL
 

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I fed Beaglina twice a day when she was a pup, and if she didn't eat it I took it away after 30 minutes. She used to get healthy treats in between though, as part of her training.

On house training, I can only second what others have said, you need to be consistent and patient - and remember that most pup owners go through a phase where they think their puppy is only one that will never ever learn /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/animal18.gif but don't worry, it passes!
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
here's a question regarding crate training - how much crate time per day? He sleeps in his crate, but beyond that...when should i crate him other than when i'm out of the house?
 

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diesel just barley learned not to go in the house.. which is nice cause we just barley got our carpets cleaned... it took a lot of time and patience. the thing that helped me the most was the crate training.. another thing is have your eyes on him.. look for signals and NEVER and i mean NEVER leave him out of your sight for even a second.

diesel learned faster every time we cought him trying to pee in the house

i feed diesel 3 cups of food a day 1 1/2 in the morning and i leave that down for him. he usually finished it by afternoon time.. but i dont give him any more until dinner time which is antoher 1 1/2 cups of food...i think that as long as you control the amount of food that is left out leaving the food out wont hurt them

i am slowly switching him to adult food now cause he is almost six months.
 

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Originally Posted By: Luigi88here's a question regarding crate training - how much crate time per day? He sleeps in his crate, but beyond that...when should i crate him other than when i'm out of the house?
I would say whenever you cannot be with him and watch him for accidents. You'll learn the signs before he squats pretty quickly. If you cannot watch him - crate him!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Here's another question: When he's crated, should we let him see us? We have him in the bedroom, and other than when we're sleeping, we close the door when he's crated in there. good or bad?
 

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I think that if he is not crying and getting panicky when you are not aroung or when you leave him crated when you leave the house, there is no reason for him not to see you when you're around.
It is important that you expose him to different sights, smells and noises.
 

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If I had the space (small cottage here) I'd probably have decided to put Bernie's crate somewhere further from the kitchen, and the cat food bowls that now live on a table away from puppy jaws. All he has to do is hear me start prepping dinner, and the whining starts. God forbid that I should feed the cats in his presence! Bernie's been crate trained from day one, and after the first couple of days, the "need to seeeeeeeeeee you, need to talkkkkkkkkkk to you" whining stopped, and bedtime is no longer an issue.

Now if I could stop Ned the feline PIA, from sitting in front of his crate, teasing him, I'd have it made!
Hope all this goes well for you! Kym and Bernie
 
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