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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Has anyone ever experienced this before? My Weimer/Aussie mix is 11 weeks old, and whenever I look into his eyes or can see his eyes when he is still, I notice that they are shaking. I can't explain it....you know how sometimes people freak you out by tellling you to look into their eyes, and then they can move them rapidly? His eyes do that...any thoughts? Ideas? Concerns? Thanks!
 

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Wish I had some advice for you, but I haven't experienced anything like that. My first thought would be something neurological, but please keep in mind I'm still very new to animal parenting and pet health nuances.

Hopefully it's just a little quirk of his, but to be on the safe side, I'm thinking a quick call to your vet wouldn't be unwarranted.

If you find anything out, let us know!
 

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Hmmm, don't have experience with that either.
I would definately call the vet.
Please keep us posted.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
This is what I found:

Congenital Nystagmus

Nystagmus is an involuntary movement of the eyes associated with vestibular or visual stimuli.
Is Nystagmus Always Abnormal?

No. Normal vestibular nystagmus occurs when you move your head in any direction. When the head is move in the horizontal plane to the right, the eyes will stay focused on an object in their visual field, and as the head moves out of that field, the eye will suddenly jerk in the direction of that movement. This is referred to as physiologic or vestibulo-ocular nystagmus. This type of nystagmus will also occur in a blind dog.4
Abnormal Nystagmus

Abnormal nystagmus is characterized by the presence of continual jerk nystagmus with the head motionless in any position. This is a spontaneous or resting nystagmus.4
Congenital nystagmus in dogs is usually associated with ocular abnormalities and visual defects.1 Because the fast movement is recognized more easily, it is used to name the nystagmus. Fluttering or flickering movements are sometimes seen in Siamese cats with strabismus. If the cat fixes its sight on an object, the nystagmus disappears. This problem of nystagmus does not seem to cause problems in cats.2
The movement is either smooth and equal in both directions (pendular nystagmus), or alternates between a slow drift and a quick, jerklike movement (jerk nystagmus)). Pendular nystagmus is usually seen in congenitally blind eyes.
This type of nystagmus is observed in Collies with known congenital and hereditary eye disorders.3
Horizontal Nystagmus

Horizontal nystagmus is a side-to-side movement most often seen in cats and dogs with vestibular disease. The "fast" component always "kicks away" from the side of the brain where there is a lesion; then this is followed by a slower return phase.5
Rotatory Nystagmus

Rotatory nystagmus involves more violent movement of the ball and usually indicates a more severe brain damage.
Animals with congenital eye abnormalities such as microphthalmia, persistent pupillary membrane, and cataracts, or conditions with a very early onset of blindness often show abnormal eye movements of wandering nature termed as "searching nystagmus."6
The Biard dog is affected by an autosomal recessively inherited retinal disease with severe, early-onset visual impairment and blindness. The cause is thought to be a genetic defect. Most affected dogs have nystagmus. Puppies can be diagnosed using electroretinography procedure.7
Treatment of Nystagmus

Gene therapy is a promising tool for treatment of genetic disorders in which the gene defect is known. In the eye, this therapy seems exceptionally promising and has already been shown in practice.
Acquired Nystagmus

Dogs with ear diseases such as otitis media or otitis externa often have balance problems. Balance is governed primarily by semicircular canals which are located in the inner ear. These balance problems may be characterized by head tilt, circling, incoordination, and nystagmus].8 Untreated ear diseases can lead to erosion of the skull bones and meningitis (inflammation of the brain).
 

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No, I hadn't heard of that, thanks for posting the info.

Have you had a chance to check with a vet yet? Any word on little one and his eyes?
 
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