Our Beagle World Forums banner
1 - 20 of 20 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,729 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Charlie is such a sweet boy at most of the time, even in the dog park off leash too! He gets along with everybody more than just fine, to human too. Just lovely....BUT when he is on leash he seems like another dog. He lunged at 2 dogs today, one a big brown lab, and the other cocker spaniel, both bigger than he is. He barked so loud it's ear piercing, I have to pull Charlie aside, I fear the head on. Then when they approached closer, Charlie just lunged fearlessly snarling teeth. :angryfire: I was totally freaked out. :freak:
I scolded Charlie, he knew something went wrong, he was scared, pawed up to my lap, ears and tail drooped. I rubbed it some more, bad boy, no more walking we go home.
People must think I have a vicious dog of only 24 lb beagle.
Any advise rather than time out! I'm not talking to him, and he knows it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
324 Posts
charlie's mom,you have done the best thing I known to teach him right from wrong. Beagles can be very sensitive to terms "Good Dog" or "Bad Dog". They seem to work for me. But part of your problem goes back to when Charlie was a puppy. When little if puppies are not exposed to other dogs very much these confrontatins will sometime comeup. I have really never had that problem but if I did. I think I would approach it the same way you are doing now. Scold him,tell him,"Bad Boy",and take him home & ignore him. IMO-this will have a greater impact on him then anything else you can do.JMHO
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,632 Posts
Well, all I can say is that I am in the same boat as you. Spencer is a doll, sweetest dog you will meet EXCEPT if he is on leash. If he is on leash, he gets aggressive with other dogs. If Spencer meets a new dog, it has to be off leash.

Good luck!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
324 Posts
Spencer's Mum,if it only happens when he is on a leash. It is back most dogs fell they are at the disadvantage to bigger dogs when they are on a leash. It is not aggression showing but him showing but his way of showing he won't be dominated.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
124 Posts
Charlie Mom, I had the same problem with a 75lb pit bull down the street. It was a simple fix, she would go crazy when he walked by so I scruffed her, made her sit and told her "NO" every time he walked by. After having his owner walk by five times she realized he wasn't going to hurt her. I guess the pit bull likes aggressive girls because every time he sees her he howls and wants to play. /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/laugh.gif
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
182 Posts
We are having the same issue with the puppy and only when on leash. He is going through puppy school right now and the trainer said to give him a leash correction when he starts and a loud "uh-uh" and then a sit. So far so good.

BJ's problem area so far - small children. Talk about embarrassing, nothing like having your puppy lunge and growl at a toddler. But when I thought about it he had never seen a small child before, nobody under 5'9" at home.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,098 Posts
I use leash control and 'heel' whenever I see the early signs of a bark or growl about to happen. (Eyes locked, Ears back and tail straight out); I also remind with the phrase 'no bark' (which in our household also includes growls)

By the way Charliemom, it's constant vigil with me, since both my dogs have always warned off other dogs while on leash. (Maggie learned it from Cal). If I watch their reactions as another dog or person approaches, they calm more quickly, and usually no bark or growl sneaks out, since I correct with a leash-snap if they misbehave. With time and vigilence, walks have become less confrontational. My biggest fear is meeting another dog with the same behavior followed by an owner that doesn't correct that dogs behavior, because then Cal goes on defensive mode no matter what.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,729 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks Deb, one more question. Do I stop all together, pull him aside have him sit, control with the leash. Or walk normally, that will be head on with the other dog.(narrow path) /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/confused.gif
That was what I did, pulled him aside. Is that a wrong move, cause he might think that he is giving in, the other party wins, he should defend himself.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,098 Posts
Well,
I suppose there's more than one way that is correct, but I keep on moving forward with dogs at heel.
However, if either growls or snarls, there is an immediate correction, and usually I stop and have them "sit" and "look at me" (eye contact)....then remind with another "no bark".

Don't forget LOTS and LOTS of praise if they follow your "heel" and "no bark" commands. My dogs LOVE to know they did well and mom is proud.

If it continues to be a problem, you might consider some more formal training; it always seems to help if somebody with more experience can help me. I have local support in the form of the Mississinewa Valley Obedience Training Club who provide classes and support as their club moneymaker. All the members show their dogs competitively and practice obedience daily. They are a wonderful source of help!!

Talking to them, I am always reminded that in the dog world, the alpha has to always be in charge!
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
4,444 Posts
Our two are still terrible when meeting dogs in the woods. They have to be on leash so dont know how they would react to dogs if they were allowed to run with them. Dog walkers know us now and ignore the barking, Dave has got used to it! At home they are two little angels and were well behaved when Susis sister came to visit.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
32,140 Posts
Charlie's Mom -- saw an ad for a new book by Patricia McConnell called "Feisty Fido" -- description says: Is Fido a little feisty when he sees another dog? Lots of good dogs are overly reactive when they see another dog while out walking in the neighborhood. If this describes your dog, help is on the way in this practical and user-friendly booklet.
Author is a certified applied animal behaviorist who has several books out about various behavior issues, conducts seminars and has a call-in show on public radio. Here is her website: http://www.patriciamcconnell.com/
I would love to go to one of her seminars but Tampa is not on her tour list. Maybe some day ...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
158 Posts
so, we had a really bad time out walking today, and as the problem is similar to Charlie's I thought it made sense to post it here to keep the info together...

We were on what *should* be a protected path through the woods when I suddenly heard hunters and their dogs, Beaglina's hackles went up and we turned round to walk back, but two of the (big) hunting dogs came running towards us - Beaglina started really howling and straining at the lead but fortunately they turned back. But after a few minutes we came across a couple walking a jack russell, she was off the lead and came running straight up to us, and Beaglina howled at her, but she came closer and then they started snarling and trying to attack each other. I was stuck in the middle as Beaglina was on the lead and got bitten - by MY dog!

I've seen some good advice above on what to do generally with aggressive dogs, but I really don't know what I should have done in this situation. I mean how should I have reacted the first time when the other dogs were charging towards to her? and I really don't know what I should have done to prevent her and the JR fighting or separate them once they started, or even how I should have reacted when she bit me... any ideas/help??
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,729 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Bealina's mom, glad you pull this up because I didn't know Judy had a great suggestion there and I missed it. I'll check into it, but there are couple of books, which one talks about dog on leash more?
Well, it has been a while, Charlie...hmmm matured quite a bit, I have a controlled leash, I correct him when such thing happens. Which means it does happen still. /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/wink.gif :rolleyes: I carry with me a squirt bottle during walks. When confronting with another dog during walks, first I would say "no bark" from a distance. Snap the leash, but I keep walking. At the same time telling him let's go, no bark. If he continues to be agressive, then I squirt. All that action will turn into just a whimper after the squirt. But usually I'll wait till the last if others didn't work. Charlie is quite stubborn and dormanant at times, so for me, I need to me firm and be the alfa dog at most time. I finally realize that it is ok if Charlie be named "not friendly" I just walk my own way and still enjoy.
As for the biting, that is a no no :nono5:
you need to tell Beaglina you are the boss. I would say "no" firmly. Take her home ASAP and not talk to her for a while, grounded! Trust me, they know what's going on when you are not paying attention to them. /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/wink.gif Charlie did, hide in the crate all that time when I grounded him. It really takes time and more training. So far a squirt bottle works for me when others failed. Good luck.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
32,140 Posts
Rhoda,

I didn't read all of the replies to this post, but I from browsing through it, I agree with Deb. When Charlie goes wild on walks (with a leash), correct him and get him to a down position. Don't continue the walk until he completely calms down. Try to correct him even when you sense he is getting excited, so you can stop his excitement on the first stages. After he completely calms down, prais him a lot and continue the walk. It will take time and many many repetitions, but I'm sure it will work. Try not to show him that you are tense when you see a dog approaching so that he won't get the excitement from you.

I think Cesar Millan had a case like that on one of his shows, when a dog was amazing except when on the leash.... you need to be calm and assertive (as Cesar say). You are the boss and you won't have Charlie start getting out of control.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
158 Posts
thanks Charlie mom, I'll definitely try the water thing, and maybe I should try and introduce her to some new dogs... at the moment she has 5 dog friends she plays with regularly and she's the submissive one in each relationship so it's really strange.

about biting me, I don't think for a moment it was deliberate, she was just panicking as she was tied up and the other dog wasn't I think. not that that excuses it - and I have a HUGE bruise! /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/frown.gif
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,199 Posts
Generally speaking if your dog is fine with other dogs when loose but confrontational and noisy when on the lead then it's through fear not aggression.

It's the classic "fight or flight" responce. Since they can't use the flight responce because they are attached to the lead then the only other option is to fight.

They aren't being bad they are just afraid. Careful introduction to dogs that you know to be friendly coupled with good obedience are the answers.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,632 Posts
I have the same problem with Spencer and it is because he is scared, like Jennifer said, it's "Fight or Flight". You basically need to stop the barking and stuff before it even starts. You need to snap them out of that mindset before they can even start. It is not easy but from watching Cesar Millan, it has given me the way to do it, I just haven't come across any dogs since watching the show.

I would be careful with scolding a dog when they are in this state of mind, you could just make things worse.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,729 Posts
Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Quote:Originally posted by Spencer's Mum:

I would be careful with scolding a dog when they are in this state of mind, you could just make things worse.
Spencer mom, you are right, and of course others advise is very good too.
Our house call trainer came by today. My daughter did the training. He said, either Charlie is trying to protect me or protecting himself. He thinks if he is on leash he is in a submissive position, and he is scare.
What I need to do is to reassure him that things under MY control. I should walk in front of him, put him under a heal command, me walking slightly ahead by my side. At the same time telling him it is ok. I haven't try that yet sounds good but I have to be calm first. :rolleyes:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
158 Posts
Yeah, in Beaglina's case too she was clearly panicking - that's why I didn't know what to do - though thanks to you all I have more of an idea now /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/smile.gif

I've been waiting to see if it happens again, or if it was a one-off because of the incident with the hunting dogs - but of course we haven't seen a single 'unknown' dog since then!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
158 Posts
Just a quick update - while out today we saw the same dog again, only this time Beaglina was off the lead playing with another dog, so I decided to just watch and see what happened... When she saw the other dog she just stopped and waited with her hackles raised a little, and the other dog (off its lead, like the first time) went running straight up to her and snarled and snapped at her! and Beaglina ran off - phew! Then, after that they just ignored one another. So, I was really relieved, BUT one thing that annoyed me so much was that when I commented on the other dog's behaviour the owner said "oh, she's always like that"!!
 
1 - 20 of 20 Posts
Top