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Kramer, that quiet little cutie inside the house turns into Mr Beagle Von Barks Alot :evilgrin: outside the house. More specifically, whenever another dog is in his view. Oscar then feels obligated to give a halfhearted bark or two to support his brother, but Mr. BVBA seems to lose control. Any advice would be appreciated. Thanks.
 

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This is a problem, we have it with ours. Susi goes almost blind with rage when another dog comes towards us, its almost as if she cant see it and she barks and snaps in all directions. Snoopy goes into the attack but stops once the dog has gone.
We have been told by dog trainers that the only answer is far more contact with other dogs. We should go to a dog obedience class with a play-group. Our two have to be muzzled for this but we shall try it in the summer.
Another trainer swears by first teaching the dog to 'leave', i.e. go past food, toys etc. As soon as the dog goes to take the treat one shouts 'leave' and pulls the dog towards you. Once they have learnt that you can use the 'leave' command, when they go for a dog.
We are trying the following right now. Susi and Snoopy walk to heal quite well. If we see a dog coming we wave a treat in front of their noses and wait until the dog has gone past before giving it. They are supposed to then associate strange dogs with getting treats. Thats the theory!!!! It has worked a couple of times so far.

What did work was having a beagle and its owner come to afternoon tea. Maybe our two remembered her from their prison days, Jenny was also a research beagle, but they let her sniff about our garden without any trouble. If you have friends that dont mind risking having their dogs bitten maybe could invite them over and keep the dogs on a lead to start with.

Anyway, hope the above is some help
 

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Quote:Originally posted by A doghouse:
If we see a dog coming we wave a treat in front of their noses and wait until the dog has gone past before giving it. They are supposed to then associate strange dogs with getting treats.
I like that - I think I'll try it.

The one time we let him approach a strange (and much bigger) dog he didn't try to bite him, he just continued to bark - right in his ear. I think the other dog just rolled his eyes and yawned, as Mr. Beagle Von Barks Alot was no bigger than his head.
 

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try making him sit and use the treat to focus him on you. After the other dog passes...lots of praise and then the treat. I did that with my Sammy as a puppy and from then on I had to carry treats during our walks.
 

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Charlie too goes crazy when other dogs pass by our fence, blind with rage too, LOUD LOUD bark. I thought of the muzzle, only when he goes out during the busy hour when everyone is walking their dogs. I think for just an hour with the muzzle won't be a torture, he does not like it, it won't hurt him or anything like that.
I can hear people over the fence complains /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/frown.gif
One even whistled, I tried that, maybe it was coming from inside the house, he did not freeze up. I'm very embarrassed. :redface:

Charlie mom
 

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here in the colder climates...once it gets warm and everyone is outside more, it's like Georgia completely forgot how to act around people and other dogs. She just howls and howls at other dogs...once she gets used to being outside more, I think she will calm down.
okay, I HOPE she will.
 

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I use an empty soda can with a few pennies inside.
I keep it by the door for when she gets carried
away. If I tell her to stop and she ignores me, I
just shake the can. She hates the sound of it.
 

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We have the same problem with our rescue Moose - he is very mild-mannered most of the time but if he is out on a walk and he sees another dog he goes beserk (usually then geting the other two going as well, and then it becomes a scene). It is much more of a problem when I walk him alone or with a female friend - if Marc or any male for that matter is along Moose may still make a bit of noise but he isn't completely out of control. Moose is also fine at the dog park when he is off leash and can go up to meet another dog directly - he is perfectly quiet and well-behaved then. He has also been at daycare in the past for years with other dogs and so I really don't think it is tied to not being socialized with other dogs - at least in Moosie's case.

As for how to deal with it, we have also used the "distract with food" technique and it works quite well most of the time. Also good, especially when I am walking the dogs alone, is to just avoid the confrontation situation and go the other way if I see a dog coming - I know that doesn't deal with the underlying problem but it does make the walk much quieter! Another thing that has worked very well in the past is also to give Moosie a toy to carry for his walk - he loves toys and will willingly carry something for hours if he is in the right mood, and I really think it works like a pacifier because if he has a toy in his mouth he won't make a peep the entire walk. And most recently I have been really trying (with some success too) to be more assertive with him and trying to get him to listen to me and shut up before he really gets going.

Good luck!
 

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Calvin has the same problem; I've found that time and discipline (on a leash) have lessened the problem....I've had Cal two years....and things have improved a lot.

He behaves better in the 'heel' position, and I DO use a choke collar on him during our walks around town, which signals to him that he will be disciplined if he misbehaves. (I was trained on proper usage during obedience class)

You'll learn a lot in obedience class; when the boys are settled a bit, you might consider a class. It really helped ME answer some behavior questions!! My dogs are far from perfect, but I've worked on the most serious problems, and things have improved greatly with patience and time.
 

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I have the same problem as Doghouses's Susi. Foxy-Roo has this built in fear of strange dogs when out and will aroooo at the top of her voice at them and cannot be distrated, believe me I have tried most things, a spray bottle. treats, telling her to leave. She walks down the road looking for other dogs in the distance.

I have even had a behaviourist (reccommended by vet) out who was a very aggressive lady and wanted to set her bull mastiff onto Foxy who would teach her a lesson. I presumed she was saying the bull mastiff was a stooge dog but I had no confidence in the lady so it went no further.She talked to me like I was a complete idiot. She did tell me that Foxy had fear aggression (which I had already deduced for myself)

Walks with Foxy are not a pleasant experience and the only safe way to walk her is on a halti and if she sees another dog you have to turn her head so she cant fixate on the other dog and kick off.

When we went on holiday laast year, we kept running into dogs everywhere and Foxy spent most of the time arrrrroing at them all, god forbid if any of them came over.....

She is fine with other dogs off lead, we went to aa Beagle B-B-Q with other beagles there and off lead she was fine if a little hesitant, when she clicked they were not going to hurt her she was fine.

I cannot take her to the field and put her ona a long lead for a run she is so stressed! I have tried!!

The other two are fine and I have no concerns aabout them.

Foxy would be good at agility as she is quick and is intelligent but other dogss there would be a problem....

We love her to bits and walks just have to be managed but I wish she could be not so fearful when out. My dog trainer would not have her in the class with such an over the top hysterical reaction as it would not be fair to the others


She is such a sweet beagle aand gives so much love and is a good friend to Caleb and Gwenni.

She is much better as she gets older but I fear that this is something that will always be with her. Hubby does'nt really get it and thinks that lots of love will conquor this problem and is naive about it and the topic has caused some rows. I dont want to risk a dog fight by letting all and sundry come upto her and have someone call the poilce and have the Dangerous Dog Act called upon where a dog perceived to be a dange to other dogs or people can be seized and destroyed if a court warrants it.

I fully understand the jecky/hyde analogy...

It just makes me sad as I love all my beagles, even Foxy with her issues!!
 

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I must say reading all the messages on this thread, has made me feel a lot happier! I feared our two were badly behaved because they had spent so many years in a research centre. Now I see that many beagles are like this.
Hellen, the reason we havent gone to a dog school yet is because, as you say, most schools dont want the other dogs being upset. One is prepared to try if ours come individually and muzzled, but I am not too happy about the prospect. So walks have become a pain and at weekends we even drive away from our village to find a place to walk where few dogs go.
I am worried because we are setting off for the UK soon, for a six week camping 'holiday'. Including Wales and Scotland.
 

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From reading these posts it seems that being on lead or off lead changes the dogs' behavior. I wonder if they're feeling more vulnerable when they're on lead and therefore react more aggressively.

I wouldn't have any idea how to handle this but maybe a trainer would know why this can happen.

Daisy is fine on her walks. So I have no experience with this problem. Just was a thought I had.

Monica and Daisy /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/smile.gif
 

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Quote:Originally posted by My Sweet Daisy:
From reading these posts it seems that being on lead or off lead changes the dogs' behavior.
Uh...silly question...but what's the difference between on lead and off lead? Sorry, but I'm new to this.

Also, I tried the ole "distract them with a treat" trick and it failed miserably. Mr. Beagle Von Barks A Lot couldn't care less about it. He seemed to be looking right through me as he continued to watch the passing dog. The boy is wiggly, I'll give him that. I'll continue to try the treat thing, as I can't imagine having to continue to deal with this.

Interesting tidbit - I read that if you yell "NO" when he barks, he thinks that you are barking along with him, so don't do that.
 

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I have tried 3 times all together with the new whistle I bought 2 days ago. All 3 times Charlie listened and ran back to me from the yard where he went berserk barking. My husband said maybe it was just luck, I'll try again tomorrow. I make sure Charlie gets a treat when he comes back every time. Perhaps you folks should try that too.


Charlie mom
 

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BeagleFan, on lead means on the leash, off lead running free.
Ours dont react to any old treats, what seems to work (sometimes) is a piece of cooked sausage or ham. The timing is important, which is sometimes difficult, one doesnt want the dog to think its getting rewarded for barking.
 

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It is so difficult to manage a walk when your dog is kicking off especially when you have tried lots of tatics.

It makes me very sad.

I know at some point We will have to try the behaviorist route again. It would be nice to go for a walk without it being like a military operation and scanning the horizon for approaching dogs and having to be alert!

Anyone else tried a behaviorist for this type of behaviour???
 
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