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A quick question: I got Tucker from a breeder and I knew that his dew claws were removed. However one of the claws was not removed fully and has grown back a tad bit. I am to understand this is a normal practice with breeders but my boyfriend seems to think that maybe we got Tucker from a bad breeder because of his dew claws being removed. So what is everyone's perspective on dew claws and their removal? Thanks!
 

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Many breeders will have them removed. You take them in at a few days old and it's a very easy procedure. Much more intensive when they are older.

Duke and Violet both have theirs, but Duke even has back dew claws. I really have to watch that they don't get too long and he hates having them clipped.
 

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Originally Posted By: astrolineIs it more painful as an adult or as a puppy?
probably as an adult, as a puppy its still under developed basically just a nub, that the vet snips off, takes like 30 seconds, most breeders have them done since usually the vet wont charge more then a few extra bucks to do it and its not something the dog needs really.

Either way with or without it doesn't bother the dog, it just helps so that they dont snag on things.
 

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As a breeder myself, I always have the dewclaws removed. The expense is minimal as a pup because no sedatives are necessary and as mentioned previously it is not fully developed. Some dogs have front and back dewclaws, but I have yet to see that in any of the beagles that have come through our home. The main reason to have them removed is because of the location of them. Since they do not meet the ground (and can't file themselves naturally) they are often forgotten and can grow to the point that they grow back into the dog's leg requiring surgery to repair. Also they grow so close to the leg it is hard to file or clip without risking injury to the dog. They serve no purpose to the dog unless the dog is to be used in hunting large animals. It helps the dog in treeing the animal and enables the dog to essentially hold onto the base of the tree. I hope that all makes sense.
 

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Sadie comes from the finest puppy mill stock, and has her dew claws. Bebe came from a show breeder and her's were removed at some point.
Back when we were doing our greyhound thing, some of them had them and some didn't. Someone told me it depended on the dog's form. On some dogs the dew claws would cut the outsides of the ankles (rear legs) as they ran. Then they would remove them.
 

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A lot of breeders will remove them since it's an easy snip-snip when they're young. Our breeder didn't and it cost us an extra $200-$300 to have them removed at the same time he was neutered. Which also made the healing take longer and he had to wear a cone for 2 weeks.
 

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I asked our vet about having Sadie's removed when she was spayed at age 4. She said it would be like a human being having their thumbs surgically removed. She didn't recommend it for an adult dog. If they do it when they are newborn it is easier on them.
 

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Originally Posted By: Brien & Bodie
A lot of breeders will remove them since it's an easy snip-snip when they're young. Our breeder didn't and it cost us an extra $200-$300 to have them removed at the same time he was neutered. Which also made the healing take longer and he had to wear a cone for 2 weeks.
Brien it costs $6 per pup if it is done shortly after birth. Pathetic isn't it?
 

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A quick question: I got Tucker from a breeder and I knew that his dew claws were removed. However one of the claws was not removed fully and has grown back a tad bit. I am to understand this is a normal practice with breeders but my boyfriend seems to think that maybe we got Tucker from a bad breeder because of his dew claws being removed. So what is everyone's perspective on dew claws and their removal? Thanks!
If there is nothing medically wrong with t then leave it alone. They should never be removed unless a medical issue.
Surgery can seriously hinder the body's ability to recover Dr. Dobias Healing Solutions
If you are a dog or cat owner, I urge you to think twice before you get an unnecessary surgery done. Not only it results in unnecessary suffering but every chinese medicine practitioner will tell you that removing body parts has dear consequences. Plus, how would you feel if someone cut off your ears? One of the most brutal surgeries that should be outlawed is ear cropping and declawing in cats. However even tail docking or dewclaw removal can cause problems. Did you know that the removal of the foreleg dewclaws in dogs also removes a very important acupuncture point that is connected to the function of the immune system?
 

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