Our Beagle World Forums banner
1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My 9 week old broke my wife's will and we decided to let him sleep in our bed. We are trying to house train him and we are using a crate. When we are gone for work and school he is in his crate and he cries the entire time we are away (our neighbors have rudely informed us). When we are busy in the house we confine him to an x-pen with his crate in it, he eventually ends up sleeping in the crate.

He has a separation anxiety problem, when we did crate him at night he cried throughout the night. This upset the neighbors and upset my wife who also has a stress and anxiety condition, we decided to try him in our bed. He doesn't cry, I wake up in the middle of the night and take him to the bathroom, over the past 2 nights he hasn't had any accidents, and we all less stressed. Our vet is concerned that this will delay the time required for him to become house trained. If he doesn't have any accidents in our bed and we continue to train him to go to the bathroom outside, how can this delay his training? Is there a reason he has to spend the nights of his early life in the crate?

We decided to heed our vets advice and crate him at night, we will just have to find a way to deal with his cries until he adjusts to the crate (earplugs, ambien and cookies for our neighbors!!).
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
32,140 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,097 Posts
I suppose your vet COULD be right - but I've housetrained several puppies while letting them sleep in bed with me. I wake up if I hear them moving around and can let them out. I haven't done that with the beagles, but did with a keeshond puppy and a Lab/Shepherd mix. Most of the beagle pups I've had here have been crate trained - but most of the time I've had more than one puppy at a time - and if they have a buddy, they're less likely to cry. Even now, my two little girls (Angel, about a year and a half), and Bella, who was 2 in May - half sisters - sleep together in their little house - and are crated together when I'm at work. If, for some reason, Bella isn't in with Angel, Angel fusses till sister comes to bed with her.
4 years ago I went to NY and got a little beagle girl from my Beagle Bay co-manager. JoJo was a delightful puppy - BUT she came from a VERY busy household - there was always someone home, and there were always other dogs, cats, goats, wabbits, you name it, they had it - running around. When JoJo came here I did have the other dogs, but I worked full time, and she would get very stressed and had severe separation anxiety - until I started crating her with my Chloe (who has never had puppies, but is a natural born nurturer and LOVES puppies), that solved HER separation anxiety problem.
Here is an article I found on Beagle Bay about separation anxiety. Hope it's helpful to you.
Dogs with separation anxiety exhibit extreme behavior problems when they are left alone. The most common behaviors are destruction of property (sometimes injuring themselves in the process), especially around doors or windows, howling and barking, and urination and defecation from distress. The destruction and house soiling is not an attempt to seek revenge on the owner for leaving, but is actually a panic response.

Separation anxiety sometimes happens when

A dog has never or rarely been left alone.
Following a long interval, such as a vacation, when dog and owner are constantly together.
After a traumatic event (in the dog's mind) such as time at a boarding kennel or shelter.
After a change in the family's routine, like a move to a new home, or a new person in the home.
Dogs that exhibit separation anxiety follow their owners around from room to room and become anxious even if a closed door separates them from the owner. They dislike spending time alone outdoors. They act depressed or anxious to your getting ready to leave the house.

For minor separation anxiety problems the following may be helpful:

Keep comings and goings low key. Ignore the dog the first few minutes when you come home, then calmly pet him.
Leave your dog with an article of clothing that has your scent on it-- one that you don't mind if it gets chewed on.
Provide enriched environment to keep the dog busy while alone. A Kong toy (even several) that is stuffed with soft food is good-- unstuffing it will occupy the dog. Hide favorite chewies in the house for the dog to find.
Sometimes leaving the radio or TV on is helpful, if the dog associates it with your presence. Or make a tape of family kitchen noise and play it while you are gone.
Provide aerobic exercise before leaving, but let the dog calm down before you leave. A tired dog will rest better.
Teach a sit or down stay (or use a tether) and gradually increase the distance you move away from your dog. Your goal is to move briefly out of sight while he remains in position. You want your dog to be comfortable about spending time apart from you.
Some dogs may be more comfortable in a crate - if the dog has first been trained to regard the crate as a safe haven. However, in many SA cases, confinement only worsens the dog's panic and hysteria.
Some dogs do better if they have a companion animal to keep them company. But this is not always successful, so be sure you actually want another pet.
Punishing a dog for destructiveness is not effective and may actually make things worse, since it could increase his anxiety.

Severe cases require systematic desensitization to being alone. This can take a long time. Sometimes veterinary prescribed drugs are used as a temporary measure along with the behavior modification program. Because a dog with severe separation anxiety can do damage to himself and/or your home, you may have to figure out some interim measures, such as leaving the dog at a daycare facility, or with a neighbor or family member.

Copyright © Pat Scott
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,667 Posts
Daisy sleeps with me but is crate trained. She was the same as your pup in the beginning. She would cry in the crate during the day. Now she is fine. She does have some mile SA issues, but she has gotten much better since I started leaving a radio playing when we leave. Your pup is still young
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,123 Posts
I'm doing the exact same thing with Menolly. She asleeps in my bed but stays in the crate when no one can watch her. She cries in the crate a little bit still, but has had exactly one accident in the house in about three weeks (my fault; I forgot to open the doggie door.)Now, beleive it or not, she's started going into the crate all by herself to chew toys or nap.

The way I see it, letting him sleep on your bed minimizes the chances he'll pee there, sinmce they don't like soiling thier bed. Menolly has yet to even try to pee on my bed. Anyway, as long as he's getting outside enough times to go and is going outside, I don't see any problem with it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
29 Posts
We had the same problem with our 10 week puppy crying all through the night the first week we had her. We managed to resolve this problem by moving her crate from the kitchen into our bedroom. This immediatly stopped her from crying at night. She will still wake up but then see that we are in bed and she then goes back to sleep. Peace at last!!!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,799 Posts
Ours have always slept in our bed with us. I like them in the bed because they are quiet and I know where they were. I'm not an expert though. I'm sure the people that have already posted have given excellent advise. But ours got house trained fine, even though they slept with us and and we were all 4 happier.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
The vet says his anxiety is a little higher than most puppies she sees, considering he cries bloody murder when we stand on the other side of the baby gate or x-pen in plain sight. We don't give in and we let him cry, the problem is waiting for him to stop crying so we can acknowledge him again and reward him for being quiet. Our vet told us to SPANK him or spray him with a water bottle if he doesn't stop whining after a couple of minutes!

We've tried the radio, article of clothing and providing toys, which had no effect. We also tried the wind up clock idea which hasn't helped. Our breeder gave us a toy that he had with his litter and mom thinking this might help, but he still cried all night.

If we put the crate in our bedroom, should he be able to see us? We have a small bedroom, he might have to be placed on top of a dresser. I still think he will cry all night regardless, even if we put the crate on the bed!
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
32,140 Posts
Originally Posted By: eagerinsight Our vet told us to SPANK him or spray him with a water bottle if he doesn't stop whining after a couple of minutes!

If we put the crate in our bedroom, should he be able to see us? We have a small bedroom, he might have to be placed on top of a dresser. I still think he will cry all night regardless, even if we put the crate on the bed!
I would switch vets!!!
You are not supposed to punish him for crying. Good bahavior - reward, bad behavior - ignore!

It takes time and tons of patience to get them to relax in the crate. You should start by getting him in the crate while it's open. Then you an reward him being there quietly. Feed him there, put his toys there, he will learn to associate it with being his place. Then you can start closing the door for a few seconds and reward good bahavior, gradually increasing the time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
93 Posts
A vet advocating spanking? That doesn't sound right at all!

With such a young pup, it may take a few more weeks of ambien and ear plugs (for you!) before he gets used to his crate but like Chloe's Mom said, make the crate the place to be. Food rewards, especially, will help. Oreo used to trembled when I would first put him in his crate but now he practically runs into it when I tell him to go because he knows that he always gets a treat when he goes in.
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top