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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have noticed lately that Ben has become more assertive in his dislike for other dogs getting too familiar with his hind region.

He is intereted in greeting other dogs on our walks and will sniff around and play a bit initially, but when the other dog gets too sniffy around Ben's butt, he growls, lunges and his fur stands on end!

Short of avoiding all other dogs (not really possible), how can I ease these greetings for Ben?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
2.5 years old.

I have a feeling, unfounded of course, that this stems from a not so enjoyable trip to the dog park last summer. Ben was violated repeatedly by a dog, aptly named Woody. Ben also has a very amourous little JRT girl friend that he spent a few days with in the fall while we were on vacation. I really noticed his dislike of getting sniffed escalate after this.

I think he just wants his butt left alone.
 

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That's hilarious, but I can see why you are wanting advice. Unfortunately I don't have any to give in this case. I haven't found any of mine that have that issue.
 

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Originally Posted By: *silleb*2.5 years old.

I have a feeling, unfounded of course, that this stems from a not so enjoyable trip to the dog park last summer. Ben was violated repeatedly by a dog, aptly named Woody. Ben also has a very amourous little JRT girl friend that he spent a few days with in the fall while we were on vacation. I really noticed his dislike of getting sniffed escalate after this.

I think he just wants his butt left alone.
I haven't had experience with this specific problem but I do have a dog here who doesn't like others, especially dogs that get in his face, so I can give you a bit of advice.

You need to do some focus training with him so that he is less interested in other dogs and more interested in you - that way when you can see he is getting stressed by other dogs or is in a situation that may escalate that you can pre-empt it, recall him and give him big rewards for coming to you and ignoring the other dogs.

Generally speaking - I don't take my dogs to dog parks because I think they are generally an accident waiting to happen. A dog humping another is a sign of dominance and is very rude in doggy language. There are way too many uncontrolled, unsociable dogs in dog parks for me to risk taking my dogs to them - I set up meets with friends' dogs and dogs I know are friendly instead.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I think I will give the recall and reward a go when we are on walks. I was doing this quite consistently when he was younger. He is pretty good when dogs walk by on the other side of the street, he just stops and has a bit of a look.

He lets all humans touch him. He probably wishes more humans would touch him. And he is fixed.

We don't go to the doggy park but once in a blue moon anymore. He doesn't get any exercise there. He just walks around on his own sniffing things.
 

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Originally Posted By: *silleb*I think I will give the recall and reward a go when we are on walks. I was doing this quite consistently when he was younger. He is pretty good when dogs walk by on the other side of the street, he just stops and has a bit of a look.

He lets all humans touch him. He probably wishes more humans would touch him. And he is fixed.

We don't go to the doggy park but once in a blue moon anymore. He doesn't get any exercise there. He just walks around on his own sniffing things.
You want to make sure your timing is great - don't use the food or reward as a distraction, but a motivation for the dog to recall and ignore the other ones. As soon as he looks at you, give praise, as soon as he comes over to you - BIG praise
 

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If you want Ben to have more doggy friends, or be more comfortable around other dogs, try setting up playdates with dogs that will respect his space. As in, if the other dog starts sniffing his behind, and Ben growls, the other dog immediately gives him his space. After being given space, does Ben want to go back to playing? Or does he want to fight? There's a big difference in that it sounds like he's just a little sensitive. This doesn't mean that he doesn't want to play...
 

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We have fought this since we got our two beags. When we first got Daisy they told us at the shelter that she couldn't be around big dogs. Well, we knew we had to try and fix that because my parents (whom we visit often) have two large yellow labs. When we first started visiting Daisy was AWFUL. She growled and all her hair stood up even when the labs were just standing NEAR her. Originally we started putting her on her side in a submissive position to the labs. Fortunately the labs are extremely un-aggressive so that really helped to keep things calm. It's been about a year with us visiting my parents about once a month and things are MUCH better. Daisy and Rocky both have gotten to the point where we can leave them out, free to roam, with the labs at my parents house while everyone is gone. In the beginning we also would walk them together when we would visit which I really think helped them the most. Daisy's fear aggression (we're pretty sure that's what it is) would just melt away when we were all walking. Now she is getting to the point where she somewhat play with the labs as well. We still have some issues with Daisy and Rocky and big dogs but they're not nearly as bad. We are also using treats when we walk as a reward for ignoring other dogs and it helps too. I really agree with setting up doggie dates with dogs that you know are friendly and respectful of your dog's space.

Good luck!!
 
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