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Its been a while, I was on vacation too, plus the rain and all. So today I decided to take Charlie for an adventure(birthday kinda thingy too). Yes, you all are so right about Charlie, he has quite a character, mischief, I would say snorty. He started out roaming around the park by himself, sniffing away. Didn't pay attention to any others. Then when he decided to come down to the pack, he wouldn't play, and gotten quite feisty. :greendevil: He is no longer a sweet little boy I'm afraid. When he barks he'll charge fiercely. He is afraid of me and only I can discipline him. He growled at my daughter the other day, I stopped it in time.
He has behavioral problem! I know I can still work on him, as for now it is not too serious. What should I do?
All seems to happen after the lodging and turning "1" .
Perhaps in the doggie care, they have 2 other dogs and Charlie needed to protect his belongings and food and at times defensive? /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/confused.gif He is not as friendly now, I might think twice if a child wants to pet him. Advice please.

Charlie mom

Charlie mom
 

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Wow, I'm afraid I don't know the answers to your questions. But do you think maybe he is still getting used to being back at home? Isn't 1 year old the adolescent stage for doggies?

Is he getting enough exercise? A tired young Beagle doggie is a good doggie.
 

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Sounds like he has forgotten his manners and needs to be put in his place. He is trying to assert his dominance and it needs to be nipped in the bud. Try this website for instructions
http://www.sonic.net/~cdlcruz/GPCC/library/alpha.htm
he will need to work for every bit of food, attention or play he gets.
You may also want to get him worked up by the vet as some conditions like thyroid irregularity can cause strange behaviors as well.
 

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Hi

I am sorry to tell you but Charlie is being a "normal" teenage beagle.

Caleb at one was intensely "gobby" and would stand and bark at me and would answer back,he drove everyone nuts with barking all the time and wwould bark louder and louder and would be very stubborn and deaf to commands, we even had a citronella bark collar for a while but he learnt to bark through all the sprays til he emptied the reservoir on the collar aand it was empty and he would be barking non stop!! Drove me nuts.

All you can do is reinforce positive behaaviour by giving him a treat and perhaps doing a lot of training little and often to reinforce it. We had a squirt bottle of water for the naghty barking and chewing and it did keep him in check (instantly behaves himself now if I produce the bottle)

They do settle down again but I remember I could not leave him alone for a second as he would be up to something!!! He was two before he started behaving again. Just be firm but fair and keep up little bits of training so he knows you mean business and keep his brain busy!!!

Good luck, Caleb is three now and is blossoming into a lovely laid back loyal friend that I wanted him to be instead of "devil incarnate on legs" We still have naughty moments

Good luck
 

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Charlie sounds as if he tryng you out, to see just how far he can go. Be firm now or you'll get a lot of trouble. He has to know you are alpha dog. We had trouble with Spotty, our last beagle, in later life, when she decided suddenly she was alpha dog. She even bit us a couple of times when trying to get to a dog she wanted to bite, but we soon learnt what to do. Spotties behaviour was partly due to ill health (cancer) but she needed firm handling. A dog behaviour specialist showed us small things we should do, like not look directly at the dog. If we were talking to strangers or friends whilst out walking, to drop the lead and stand on it, ignoring Spotty completely. It worked liked magic, she would lie down and wait for the human conversation to end instead of barking at the people. Another way with a dominant dog, is whilst out walking YOU decide when the dog can stop to sniff, otherwise the dog should walk to heal. Our dog behaviour specialist nearly died laughing when he watched me walking Spotty, stopping whenever she wanted to. This is only a problem if the dog has alpha problems. Poor old Spotty was a loving beagle at home .

As far as allowing children to touch Charlie is concerned. We have always played safe. When strangers come up to us, although we are sure Susi and Snoopy will be well behaved, we always say, we dont know, if asked if it is safe for the children to stroke them. Some people might be offended but it is better than a child being bitten.
Be firm with Charlie now, he'll be a happier dog for it. He has to trust you to protect him, if he is uncertain he#ll attack any thing in sight.
 

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I am seeing some of the same behaviors from Maggie who is almost nine months. She responds best to my husband and usually responds to me but is very naughty with my 13 year old. Maggie wants to jump up and grab at her clothing. It seems like she is trying to initiate a game but my daughter can't get her to stop. I wonder if a spray bottle would be an effective techinique for her.
 

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I can sure relate - I experienced Moose's naughty side this morning at the off leash dog park.

We usually both take all the dogs to the park together, but Booker, Moose and I woke up earlier this morning and Booker really wanted to go to the park so off we went... When Moose was younger he was not reliable off leash at all (we were always afraid he would just take off and never be seen again) - but he is much better now at least staying at the park so I decided I would take him off leash even though Marc wasn't there - I have probably only done this alone about 2 or 3 times in the 5 years we have had Moose so I was a bit reluctant but decided to go for it. Well, he stayed in the park fine, but getting him to come home was just about impossible. It became a game - he would come towards me when I called him, but then instead of sitting so that I could put on his leash he would bark at me (taunting me, I am sure) and then run away. I could see this dragging on for quite a while, but eventually he stopped to pee and I swooped in and got his collar.

I know I have to work on being more in command with Moose - Popcorn and Booker are fine and do seem to accept me as a leader, but Moose has always had a mind of his own in that regard. All Marc has to do is raise his voice a bit and Moose would have come straight over to him... but not me. He just gives me "the look" and does whatever he pleases.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Oh thank you.....the squirt bottle, I forgot about that, I've been screaming my head off on him, barking my command. I might go out and get more squirt bottles so they will be handy everywhere I need them. Yes, indeed Charlie is quite dominant only I can stop him, he consider me as a leader. I take care of both 24/7 head to toe, my family only play with them. If he ever bite me, I know what my husband would do, give him away!

Charlie mom
 
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