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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My girlfriend just got a 3 month old puppy! sooo cute

I asked her how everything was going and she sent me this message this morning...

She is so much fun but a little devil too! She's very stuborn and likes to pee on the carpet when she wants attention. I've decided to have her sleep in a kennel but feel bad b/c she's in it most of the day when we are at work too. But it's just temporary. Any beagle tips?

I figured...what better way to get a few beagle tips..then to ask all of you knowledgable friendly people


Anyone have any advice to offer her?
 

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A couple things that I've learned with Murphy (now just over 7 months old).

Consistency in training makes a huge difference. All the family members have to be on the same page too.

Obedience training. We've had dogs all our lives, but Murphy is the first dog we've had actual obedience training with. It's well worth the price.

Piddle pads help with potty training.
 

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I can't say much because I am at work rite now but I would like to say this that I hope will help ease her mind a bit. My youngest - Shasta B. - is now 2 and a half years. She was an 8 weeek old pup when I got her. I too felt bad about leaving her in a crate all day while I was at work. In this case, the ideal situation would be for either me to go home at lunch to give her a break outside or for someone I knew and trusted to take her out for a break after 3-4 hours HOWEVER for me, neither was a go since I didn't know none of my neighbors that well and I only get a half hour for lunch. I still feel bad about leaving her in a crate all day but the crate is like their den - their safe place. And it is also a safe place to us - the pup is safer in a crate then they are roaming in the house. Now, in the mornings when I am getting ready for work - Shasta B. knows the routine - when I am getting ready to leave, I grab a couple of treats while she runs into her crate. Yes, I hope to be able to gate off a room for her and Shiloh B. but in the meantime, this way will have to work for now.

Bak to work........
 

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ARen't beagle puppies the cutest?

believe it or not they are not malicious and don't intentionally pee on the carpet. At that age their bladder is still developing and they may not know they have to go until they actually are.

A general rule of thumb is that they can hold 1 hour for each month - so at this point, no longer than 3 hours. You need to establish a routine where the pup is routinely taken out approximately 30 minutes after eating, and immediately after they become excited.

There is a great article here on crate training - http://www.hsus.org/pets/pet_care/our_pe..._training.html.

I wasn't keen on crating myself, but it does help with the housetraining. At just over a year we are starting to give our guy some limited freedom during the day . He is baby gated in the kitchen and on a couple of occasions now, I've come to find him napping in his crate!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
perfect guys! thank you!! i'm passing on the information to her
 

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Yes, there is definitely no malice or intention behind her peeeing on the carpet - she is not doing it for attention! She's just doing it because she hasn't been trained otherwise and has not developed proper bladder control yet


My biggest recommendation would be to do some training! Has she been to puppy pre school? It's always helpful for new owners
You also want to make sure she is doing training every day with the puppy, it's a great way to bond and also to teach the puppy the right behaviours so it grows up into a well behaved, balanced adult dog. Now is the time for the puppy to learn what is right and wrong, what the rules and boundaries are etc. Beagle puppies can be stubborn and strong willed, and if they get away with that as pups they will only become more stubborn as they mature into adults.

You also want to make sure the puppy is being well socialised and she's taking him out and about and exposing him to as many new POSITIVE situations and experiences as possible.
 

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Because puppies are learning all the time, training can begin as soon as you bring your puppy home. Start by helping your pet learn the house rules, establishing a good routine and creating an environment where the humans are the leaders. Puppies are easily motivated with small food tidbits and can be taught commands such as sit, down, and stay. Due to puppies' short attention spans, training sessions should be brief but frequent. Focus on techniques using positive reinforcement, such as small food tidbits, play and attention. Family members can establish control by teaching their puppy that each reward must be earned by following the basic command.

Displaying subordinate, deferential postures (such as sit, down or stay) will result in the puppy receiving a reward. To receive anything of value (affection, attention, food, play, and walks), the puppy should perform a simple obediance task such as sit or stay. Think of this as doggy please, which allows the puppy to learn that awards are earned and not given on demand. Because getting what the puppy wants is a reward, food rewards should be phased out gradually and used only intermittently. Progress to teaching the puppy to sit and lie down in a specific spot during meals or anytime you need the puppy to be quiet. Initially, puppies may only comply for short periods of time, but with continued reinforcement, they will do so for longer and longer periods. By controlling a puppies behavior and resources, an owner can become the leader.

Does the dog free feed? Feed the dog 2 times a day, and only leave it out for 20 minutes. If he has not eaten, then that's his problem. Usually a dog will have to poo 10-20 minutes after eating (and playing and napping). This will help with irregular bathroom breaks, and will get him more on a routine. Routine is KEY!There should always be water available for the dog to drink, but since it's a puppy, there needs to be constant attention...it's harder to break a dog unless you catch him in the habit. For example, when he walks out of your site, follow him. You should be watching your puppy anyways until he is fully potty trained in the first place. If he goes to squat and pee, PICK HIM UP and tell him no! (HE WILL STOP PEEING), then emediatly take him outside and tell him your word for bathroom go potty, and praise him when he is done. There is no point in disciplining a dog when the potty accident has already happened. You never want to punish a natural function. Crate training is not cruel, it's the best.
 
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