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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
ok,
so now i have seen that there are beagle rescue centers across the u.s.
so i have some questions that arent specifically answered in any online research i have done.
1. why 'beagle' rescue as opposed to say 'dog' rescue?
... are beagles more often abused? or are they more often given up? or what?
3. what are the main resons a beagle ends up in a rescue unit?
4. is 'fostering' a beagle a good idea if you already have a well socialized pack?
5. how do they find these beagles?
6. why do they charge someone to take them?

that's enough questions for now.

I am definately interested in learning, i had a brief bonding experience the other day. i pulled around a corner and noticed a beagle laying in a yard on the other side of a fence. he was pointed away from me.
i yelled 'HEY! beagle butt! over here! he whipped his head up and around at me, then his tail started to wag.
he stood up, did the bowing stretch, then walked over to the fence and stood up on his hind legs with his front paws on the fence. tail waggin still, then cocked his head a little and just looked at me. so i smiled and cocked my head at him. we bonded.
i then looked at his surroundings. he was chained to a tree.
there was scratch marks on everything he could reach. and paw prints all over the side of the house. He did have a dog house. Im not saying he was abused, i can certainly see chaining up a beagle that digs and gets out etc. but i felt sorry for the little guy like that. got me to wondering....
C.
 

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Well, I know there are others who can answer more than I can, but #1 - as far as Beagle Rescues. Most breeds have their own rescue groups. I think it happens for a variety of reasons - love of a breed, experience with a breed, network of other lovers of a breed - that sort of thing. All breeds are different, so it is helpful to have a group of people who really know a breed in detail.

Beagles being such a popular breed end up in rescues for all the typical reasons other dogs do. A lot of dogs are found as strays or surrendered by people who can't keep their pets. Unsuccessful hunting beagles are let loose in some parts of the country.

That is so sad about the beagle you saw. Maybe not abused, but certainly not a very good life =(

I know you will get a lot more info from other BW'ers, but here's some of what I know/heard!
 

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I'll answer these the best I can. Jersey came from a Beagle Rescue and I did a lot of research while I was looking for her.

1. why 'beagle' rescue as opposed to say 'dog' rescue?

Many breeds have their own rescue organizations. People who love the breed want to help. There are rescue organizations out side of shelters and the SPCA that do take in all breeds of dogs.

2. are beagles more often abused? or are they more often given up? or what?

I don't know if Beagles are more often abused. In the south, they are often abandoned by hunters after season. They also get abandoned by hunters if they aren't good hunting dogs. They suspect this was the case with Jersey's mom (she was found as a pregnant stray on the side of the road). A lot of people get Beagles and don't realize the challenge they can be sometimes. The barking, stubbornness and attitude that we all love isn't always appealing to others.

3. what are the main reasons a beagle ends up in a rescue unit?

Most of the ones that the Tampa Bay Beagle Rescue get seem to come from shelters. Either owner surrenders or strays.

4. is 'fostering' a beagle a good idea if you already have a well socialized pack?

That's an individual decision. Depends on the pack and the foster.

5. how do they find these beagles?

Shelters often call the local breed specific rescues when they have a dog who is either sick or close to it's d-day at the shelter. Some are owner surrenders.

6. why do they charge someone to take them?

These organizations run on donations and adoption fees alone. It costs money to feed and provide shelter and medical care to the dogs. Many need heartworm treatments, aren't up to date on their vaccinations, need spays, etc.


I hope that helps answer some of your questions. I'm sure there are many more answers out there.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thank you.
those answers are exactly the type of info i was looking for.

C.
 

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Another reason for fees altho needing it for operating costs is the main reason - this also applies to why people trying to rehome through classifieds should be charging a fee: The hope is that if someone is willing to pay then the chance of a good home for the dog is better (sadly, this is not always the case). But often you have evil people looking through the classifieds who may end up using that free dog for research or as bait animals when training dogs to fight. This does sound cruel and really is but it is a sad and horrible fact of life. That's why there are groups of people who work to prevent this from happening - some of the rescues & shelters also try to educate people about this.
 

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As a supporter of Great Dane Rescue, we charge a rehoming fee to help cover the cost of feeding danes in rescue, vetting them (many times the dogs are neglected, sick or injured) and also for transportation, maintaining a kennel facility, and license fees for the kennels. We try to make it as affordable as possible and really depend 100% on donations from the public.

Dogs of all breeds generally have their own specific rescues. There are also many, many All Breed Rescues out there that will take in any breed needing rescued.

I have fostered several danes and even a couple other breeds as needed. It is a personal decision and takes time and dedication. The dogs that generally come into rescue where not taken care of the way they should have. Occassionally we do get in a well taken care, well mannered dane, but those are far and few in between.
 

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Just to add to the reason there are fees to adopt...In most cases, you are getting a dog who has been checked and treated(if necessary) by a vet, spayed or neutered, started on heart worm preventative and in a lot of cases, housebroken. What a deal!
 

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I can't add much to what has already been posted, but I can say that I have worked with a beagle rescue and continue to follow their great dedication to the breed through their website (distance keeps me from being more involved). I have seen them spend thousands of dollars on one beagle to help it recover from a terrible situation. You won't see this dedication from a shelter--the dog would be put down due to the tremendous strain on limited resources.

Thankfully, many breeds have rescues. I've seen volunteers travel for hours to bring back many dogs from high kill shelters. Again, a true dedication to the breed. Would I adopt from a rescue group--ABSOLUTELY! I would also foster a dog if I had the opportunity.

I am not sure if we can post sites...but if you have the opportunity to read some of the stories...

www.beaglemaryland.org

Read some of the stories about the care being given, the terrible conditions some of these dogs have come from. You will quickly understand the importance of breed rescues.
 

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Originally Posted By: ncdogstarJust to add to the reason there are fees to adopt...In most cases, you are getting a dog who has been checked and treated(if necessary) by a vet, spayed or neutered, started on heart worm preventative and in a lot of cases, housebroken. What a deal!
It is a deal. Whe I adopted Jersey she was spayed, up to date on her shots and microchipped. I paid $350 because she was a puppy, but it's less if the dog is older (at least with the Tampa Bay Beagle Rescue).
 

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One day, when my kids are older, I want to foster senior beagles (to my husband's dimay!!!!). Not only would I love helping a senior dog who has lower odds for adoption, I think it is a great way to teach my children about compassion, giving, responsibility, etc.

I have so much admiration for beagle rescues! I think it is such a great thing to help a dog who has had less than a wonderful life find out what it is like to be treated well!

Also on the fees, I think most breed rescues never actually make enough to cover their costs. It's a labor of love.
 

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We got our two from a humane society where we also paid a fee. Our two were spayed/neutered, up-to-date on shots, and also micro-chipped, which is becoming more and more common. Rocky also had heartworms and the shelter paid for his treatment.

The shelter told us that our two were probably hunting dogs. The problem is, most of the time if the dogs wander away from the pack, the hunters just leave them because that means they're not good hunting dogs. Rocky and Daisy were also loaded up with ticks because apparently not all of the hunters use flea/tick preventative or heartworm preventative. It's sad, but unfortunately not that uncommon.
 
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