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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok Glover is a quiet puppy most of the time but when he gets chicken he barks at it! and its such a loud bark!!

he has also taken to barking when I leave for work although this doesn´t last long my neighbour tells me.

He loves digging... (what Beagle doesn´t) and he barks while he digs (this is sometimes a good thing, because I know he´s up to no good!) I even put some ´get off´on the holes where he digs in the lawn and he now just stands there and barks at it... :eyes:

Now he barks at me when I come home from work...

grr Im getting a bit annoyed, we tried most things but would like to get more ideas. The waterbottle and shaking can doesn´t work anymore at all..
 

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I found a couple of articles on my beagle group - hope they're helpful for you.

The Barking Dog
Many dogs bark more frequently than their owners would like. In some cases barking is very persistent because it's easy for the dog to do and is even self-rewarding. Some dogs have been accidentally trained to be persistent barkers because they've learned that if they bark long enough or loud enough, eventually they'll get what they want.

You won't be able to eliminate barking, because it's normal for dogs to bark, but with many barkers the problem can be reduced to a more tolerable level.

The first step in managing a barking problem is to determine the cause. Obviously barking is an attempt to communicate, but what is your dog trying to say? Here are some of the common reasons for barking and some of the things you can try to alleviate the problem:

Separation anxiety: This barking (which only occurs in the owner's absence and is often accompanied by destructive behavior and housesoiling) is the dog's way of telling you that he is anxious about your leaving him. It is fairly common in dogs who have experienced a change in their surroundings or routine. With some work these anxious animals can usually be trained to be more comfortable and calm in the owner's absence. The Gaines booklet, "The Dog Who Cannot Be Left Alone", outlines a program for treating separation anxiety, or you may want to consult a qualified animal behaviorist for assistance.

Fear: Dogs may bark as a response to things that frighten them, often noises such as thunderstorms, firecrackers, garbage trucks, etc. If repeatedly frightened in the yard, they may bark (usually with ears back and tail down) even in the absence of the sound because the yard itself has become a scary place to be. Try a program of desensitization and counter conditioning such as suggested in the booklet, "Fear of Thunder & Other Loud Noises".

Territorial/Protective Behavior: Dogs may bark to warn away those they consider intruders in or near their territory, and they keep doing it because it's so successful - I barked, the other dog left, I barked, the bicyclist left, I barked, the delivery person left, et cetera. With the help of a variety of friends whom your dog would normally bark at, you can set up a program of gradually turning intruders into friends by rewarding your dog for remaining quiet as the person approaches nearer (using bits of a really special food). The idea is to teach your dog to anticipate that people approaching are a cue that great treats will follow if she stays quiet. Indoor barking at visitors can be discouraged by a program of distraction (give him a command like 'sit" and reward with lots of treats and attention when he's quiet).

Boredom and Loneliness: Dogs are intelligent and social creatures, and barking may be a reaction to be isolated. The best cures are spending more time with your dog and giving her the mental and physical exercise she needs to feel content when you can't be around. Leaving her attractive objects like chew toys, large rubber balls, or toys with food stuffed inside may help, but a long, vigorous walk or game of fetch followed by a review of obedience routines may do more to keep her happy when you leave.

There's no quick fix for barking, and a "bark collar" should never be used unless suggested by a qualified animal behaviorist. They can make the problem worse when used on a dog who is barking due to separation anxiety or other types of fearful behavior.

Copyright 1994 and 1997 by Suzanne Hetts, PhD, Denver Dumb Friends League and Scott Line, DVM, PhD Animal Humane Society. If this material is reproduced, please credit the Denver Dumb Friends League and the Animal Humane Society.
 

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Here's another.
Barking
Excessive barking typically occurs in dogs that are left unsupervised for extended periods of time. They bark because they are bored, lonely, or frustrated. Barking is difficult to control because it is a normal and natural behavior for dogs. For many it becomes an enjoyable way to pass the time.

A simple way to help stop barking is to spend more time with your dog and supervise him when he’s outside. Adequate exercise can make a big difference in a dog that barks. A tired dog that has burned off much of his energy is less likely to have the energy to do a lot of barking.

It’s also important to reward your dog with attention and praise when he is lying quietly. Remember, if you pay attention to the dog every time he’s barking, he will quickly figure out that he gets attention every time he’s barking. To your dog even negative attention is better than none!

Teaching your dog the “quiet” command can also be effective. After the first couple of woofs, tell him “quiet.” If he quiets down for a few seconds, praise him. Gradually increase the length of quiet time. You should be able to get to one to two minutes of quiet time in the first training session. If he barks during the quiet time, immediately give him a correction. A correction can be a gentle tug on the collar and a repeat of the quiet command, in a deep, no-nonsense tone of voice. Often, owners complain that their dog can’t hear the initial command over the barking. In these cases, you should give the “QUIET!” command in a very loud, surprising voice. If the dog ceases barking for even a brief moment, give PRAISE just as enthusiastically. It’s very important to be consistent in this training. The dog must always be given the command QUIET after the first couple of barks and then MUST be given a correction or praise following his response.

There are also many anti-barking training tools out on the market. These should be used only under the supervision of an experienced trainer as they can harm the dog if used improperly.
 
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Eek same thing here. I think it's their way of telling us off lol. Because Chase barks at me ALL the time. It's usually when I tell him not to do something or correct his behavior. It's almost like he's telling me "Oh hush I'll do it again" lol

I have no advice for this though sorry. I think it's just something they do.
 

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I'm not sure, but it sounds like dominance....
He shouldn't be barking at you, not when you leave or coming back home.
Try practicing leaving and coming back with him. Don't leave the house until he is calm and quiet, and when you return and he barks, ignore him until he quiets down and is calm.

I would also consult a trainer and check with him, to make sure you are doing the right thing and not making things worse.

He is very young and it shouldn't be difficult getting him back on track.
 

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Did somebody call /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/laugh.gif /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/laugh.gif /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/laugh.gif

Rasha Arooos when she is playing or wants to play. Most of the time ours are fairly quiet but if one starts then they all start :rolleye11:
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Quote:Originally posted by barking mad:
Did somebody call /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/laugh.gif /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/laugh.gif /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/laugh.gif

Rasha Arooos when she is playing or wants to play. Most of the time ours are fairly quiet but if one starts then they all start :rolleye11:
lol
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Quote:Originally posted by Chloe's Mommy:
I'm not sure, but it sounds like dominance....
He shouldn't be barking at you, not when you leave or coming back home.
Try practicing leaving and coming back with him. Don't leave the house until he is calm and quiet, and when you return and he barks, ignore him until he quiets down and is calm.

I would also consult a trainer and check with him, to make sure you are doing the right thing and not making things worse.

He is very young and it shouldn't be difficult getting him back on track.
yes I now stay in the house to make sure he quiets down before I leave, and he does, oops should have mentioned that earlyer.

thanks Chloe´s mom!

I do think it is a dominance thing and he is telling me off.

Beaglemom - I liked the second article, Im going to try that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Quote:Originally posted by Chase Mommy:
Eek same thing here. I think it's their way of telling us off lol. Because Chase barks at me ALL the time. It's usually when I tell him not to do something or correct his behavior. It's almost like he's telling me "Oh hush I'll do it again" lol

I have no advice for this though sorry. I think it's just something they do.
lol thank you /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/laugh.gif
 
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