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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
OK, following some threads about it lately, and reading some other posts on my other forum, I wanted to try BARF with Chloe. At least part-time.

Should I expect any digestion problems? Diarrhea or something like that for the first day or two? What type of meat is recommended? (I know chicken necks and marrow bones but what else?).

I was thinking mornings kibble and evenings a small portion of something raw.

Any advice?
 

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I feed raw. Have been doing it for about five months now.

Is there a PM feature on this board? If there is feel free to start a convo with me or we can chat in this thread.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Originally Posted By: *silleb*I feed raw. Have been doing it for about five months now.

Is there a PM feature on this board? If there is feel free to start a convo with me or we can chat in this thread.
Thanks, basically this was my only major concern... if you have an answer that other users will benefit of - that's great.

<span style="color: #993399"><span style="font-size: 8pt">btw - we do have PMs here. When you click on the user's nickname, you can choose to PM them.</span></span>
 

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Originally Posted By: Chloe's MommyShould I expect any digestion problems? Diarrhea or something like that for the first day or two? What type of meat is recommended? (I know chicken necks and marrow bones but what else?).

I was thinking mornings kibble and evenings a small portion of something raw.

Any advice?
Chloe may experience a detox period if you decide to switch her over. When I switched Ben I did it cold turkey. One day he was on kibble, the next he was given raw food. This worked out fine for us. The only detox I noticed in him was an increased amount of poops for about a week. He was cleaning house of all of the bad crap from the kibble. After that initial week his poops became solid and small, which is the desired result. In the year and a half we had him before going raw he NEVER ONCE had a solid poop. NEVER.

I have heard that some dogs may get itchy as their bodies try to release the toxins from the kibble. I didn't notice this with Ben.

Very shortly after he started onthe raw diet we really started to notice a difference in the quality of his coat. So much softer and super shiney. He also became more frisky. It also helped with some allergies that he was experiencing.

You can basically feed Chloe a wide and diverse selection of meats if you have access to them. Just watch out for fatty meats like pork and duck. Ben eats chicken, turkey, beef and bison. A portion of her daily food should also consist of veggies and fruits which must be processed (steamed/mashed, etc) for her to digest them. She also needs organ meats or tripe. This should be about 10% of her daily intake. And depending on her age and health there are supplements that can be given. Ben takes herring oil and kelp on a daily basis. And of course raw meaty bones are imprtant as well.

Start by cutting out ALL GRAINS. No more rice, bread, crackers, cererals, potatoes, etc. if you are in the habit of feeding her table scraps. The only grains Ben gets now are in his treats, which I have also started to switch over to raw baby carrots and cheese. But sometimes nothing beats an old milk bone.

The amount you are feeding is dependent on weight. Ben weights about 28 lbs. so he gets 3/4lb of food per day. If Chloe is under/overweight you can try feeding her based on what her optimal weight should be within reason.

For ease and convenience I buy Ben's food already prepared. I buy it in 5lb frozen blocks. Each block contains human grade meat, bone, veg, fruit and organ meat. He also gets chicken backs every once in a while as a treat - although he doesn't really know what to do with them and has tried to bury them in the couch. Many people prepare their own raw diets for their pets. I just don't have the time, the storage space, nor the access to a variety of meats at a reasonable price. Some raw feeders have access to slaughter houses or know hunters that can provide them with meat and offal.

I am so not an expert on this, but I do know that this diet has been great for my dog. There are numerous books and websites out there that have great information.

One thing I would caution against is doing raw only part time. The raw diet is meant to cleanse and return your dog to a more instinctual and natural way of eating that is GRAIN FREE. By continuing to feed kibble you would be counteracting that process. Just something to think about.
 

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There is a store where I live that specializes in raw food for pets. That is all they sell. They carry about 5-7 brands of frozen foods and they also stock frozen spines, etc.

http://bonespetboutique.com/

There is one other traditional pet store in my city that sells it as well.
 

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As of this week the dogs here are all on 100% raw. Daisy had her third ear infection in two years and I had to take her to the vet to get her ears flushed out
I have decided to change their diet to completely raw (was previously feeding about 1/2 raw 1/2 kibble or 1/4 raw 3/4 kibble) as I have heard about people whose dogs who have been changed over to BARF when they have had yeast infections (both skin and ears) and the change has been quite considerable.

I don't know anyone who has had bad side effects once changing to BARF, unless their dogs have allergies. I have only heard of the good things: excellent condition, shinier coat, healthier teeth, less farting, smaller poos etc.

We are feeding the Dr Billinghurst BARF patties around every second day and chicken frames/necks/wings etc every other day.
 
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