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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all!

I'm momma to two beaglebears, one of which I adopted from a university research facility that I volunteered at.

I'm also a writing student working on a project about... research beagles! And let me tell you, the world out there is pretty hush-hush about laboratory beagles. A lot of what I know comes from my experience with my former research girl, so if any of you live with research beagles, I would love to know a bit about your pup.

The kind of information that I'm interested in:
- where did your beagle come from? Specific research facility, intermediary rescue, commercial breeder (When I adopted Zowie I got her history, which told me where she was born)
- what was your beagle like at first? (Mine trusted no one and wouldn't go into a space smaller than a washroom for years)
- did it take a lot of work to socialize your pup to family and home life?
- did the research affect your pup in a long-term way? (Mine was used for anaesthesia workshops a few times and has breathing and barking trouble)

Lots of questions! I would appreciate it so much if you could take the time to answer, even briefly, and tell me a bit about your experience.

Thanks in advance!
Tamara
 

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Don't have one but I would take one in a heartbeat!

Let me poke around my contacts in the states where beagles are sold to Class B dealers.

I read a book some years ago, I think the name 'Bea was in the title, it would about a precious beagle girl from a research lab ... anyone here remember the proper title so Zowie can grab it?

Best of luck, and please keep us posted about your preciouses.
 

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Hi Tamara,
We have two ex-research beagles. We adopted them 3 years ago, when they were aged 6. Susi came from a health research centre here in Germany, called the GSF Centre. Snoopy was also a university research beagle used for the students to practise on and as a sperm bank.
Susi Was forced to produce one litter after another, at the same time being polluted with pesticides. The pups were then killed and tested for damage caused by the pesticides. She was finally released and sent to the university where Snoopy was, to be sterilized. Beforehand though, they got her pregnant again and after a certain time removed the embryos and sent them to a hospital for research on embryoligy. Snoopy came free at the same time, having also been sterilized, and they went together to an animal shelter, where we met them. Not wanting to seperate these two beagles who had become close friends, we adopted both.

The early days were heart breaking, they were so nervous and Susi jumped at every sound, she also wasnt house-trained and had accidents until recently. She also had never seen stairs and we had to teach her how to use them to get up to the bedroom. They just wanted to sleep at first and we tried to leave them in peace as much as possible. Any strangers were met by growls from Snoopy and he would jump on the couch and just warn them to stay away. i think both were scared they would be taken away from their safe home. When we bought them baskets to sleep in they spent most of the day in them, probably couldnt believe that they had a basket all to themselves.
It took months before they felt happy in the garden, we would be sitting out there and they would be on the couch in the lounge.
I shall continue this later for you, a neighbour has just arrived.
 

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I don't have any - but I do know a few people who have adopted ex-research beagles. One of my neighbors had one that she had to re-home, she worked and just wasn't home enough to deal with the issues that came with the dog. It is one of the things that just makes me furious. I live near a large university with a well-known vet teaching hospital. Of course they won't admit they do research - or all they will admit to is food research - which if you read about what they do to the dogs is pretty bad. Some years ago a friend who was working at the university called me in a panic - she said they had 150 dogs that they were going to put to sleep if they couldn't find homes for them. I got online with my beagle group and had homes lined up for quite a few of them. But when I tried to get in touch with the university, I got a major run around. I don't know WHERE you got YOUR information, but we don't have any beagles HERE - well, I happen to know that they DID have beagles there - LOTS of beagles there - but they were afraid to admit it because of [censored] retalliation. Fortunately they WOULD work with Seattle Beagle Rescue and the dogs were eventually placed in homes. From what I've learned, most of these dogs spend much of their lives in cages - they don't know how to walk on grass! The don't know how to interact with humans - probably not dogs either. It sets my blood boiling! Just thinking about what these babies go through I'm sitting here crying!
I'm so glad Susi and Snoopy have found a wonderful home filled with love and no more pain!
 

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Part two of Susi and snoopy's story.
It took ages before they would explore the garden, but one thing they enjoyed straight away was going for walks. maybe because we kept them on the lead and they felt we were protecting them. Susi soon became a proper hound, nose to the ground, exploring the wonderful outside world. We live in the woods (or edge of) so its straight out of the house into the woods. To this day however, they bark the moment they are out as if to say 'we are coming, get out of the way'. Susi wails if another dog comes but Snoopy goes for it. The only dogs they dont attack are beagles.
We have tried to teach them to play, but they just look at us as if we are mad when we throw a ball. We made the mistake of giving them a soft toy to play with. Susi immediately took it and nursed it and growled at Snoopy if he went near. She thought it was a pup. So no soft toys are allowed in this house.

recently Snoopys brother Spike and their jail mate, Feivel, also became free. Unfortunately the GSF is not letting the animal rescue centre take any right now. Thousands of animals are destroyed once no longer needed. To think Susi and Snoopy might have been put down is terrible.
Snoopy, Spike and feivel were born in a mass kennels in Paderborn, Germany, most of the animals are bred purely to sell to research centres. I am not sure where Susi was born, but probably in the GSF.
If you have any other particular questions then please feel free to ask.
 

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Thank you for writing about this and thank you for taking in research beagles.

I went to university at a school that has a vet college and research facility. I used to volunteer to walk the research beagles. At that time I was not very familiar with dogs, but still had a fondness for beagles.

The beagles, dozens of them, were kept in large kennels and the smell was so strong and foul in the kennel rooms. They all howled and barked so loudly whenever anyone came in to walk them. You could only walk one at a time and that was very hard. I tried to take a several beagles out, one after he other, every time I went. Most of the time they were just to excited to get out. They were not leash trained or housebroken (they would pee in the hallways on the way out of the building). Some were so timid they were impossible to walk.

One little guy named Pickles was my favourite. He was very shy, but for some reason I just took a liking to him.

I am not sure what they were researching at that facility or what happened to the beagles when they were done with them.

Now that I am a beagle momma it just breaks my heart that all thouse beagles are being treated so poorly.
 

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dont have a research beagle but i do have a friend who works at the air port. he told me this story:

he was un loading cargo and pulled out six crates with beagles in them. he thought they were cute so he pulled them out to look at and pet them. he was playin around and did the super beagle and pulled his ears out and noticed a the dog had a number tattooed on teh inside of his ear. he assumed they were lab beagles.

maybe that helps put you in another direction
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
sillieb, any chance you were volunteering at U of G? I ask because your description fits the CAF exactly. And I do recall meeting a fella named Pickles there... if it isn't the same place then it's a crazy coincidence! My girl Zowie came from the CAF but her name there was Timex, all the beagles had completely stupid names. One litter was named after sodas: Pepsi, Sprite, Coke, 7-up, Pop. Yikes.

Thank you so much everyone for your responses so far, it's extremely helpful because as some of you know, beagle research is all about secrets and not letting the public know what's going on. Last year in Canada, 9,552 dogs were used in regulated research, almost all of which were purpose-bred beagles. And that doesn't count companies that don't register with the organization that governs lab animal welfare...
 

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The book mentioned in an earlier post is, For Bea, by Kristin Von Kreisler. It's a wonderful book, and not very long. It might give you some more insights.
 

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Susi and Snoopy's story just breaks my heart, but how wonderful that they (and their buddies) ended up with a happy ending. You are an angel to have saved them and show them so much love.

It is so sad that these special little dogs with such big hearts and wonderful personalities end up in research facilities. I pray that someday this will be a thing of the past.
 
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